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Full text of "Annual report"

TOWN DOCUMENTS 

Seventy-Eighth 

Annual Report 

OF THE 

Town of Swampscott, Mass. 

For the Year Ending December 31 

1929 




DESCHAMPS BROTHERS 
SALEM, MASS. 
1930 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



Seventy- Eighth 

Annual Report 

OF THE 

Town of Swampscott, Mass. 

For the Year Ending December 3 1 

1 929 




DESCHAMPS BROTHERS 
SALEM, MASS. 
1930 



2 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



Elected Town Officers, 1929 



Selectmen 
Howard K. Glidden, Chairman 
R. Wyer Greene Daniel F. Knowlton 

Moderator 

John R. Hurlburt 

Town Clerk arid Collector of Taxes 

Ralph D. Merritt 

Town Treasurer 

James W. Libby 

Water and Sewerage Commissioners 

George D, R. Durkee, Chairman 
Term expires 1931 
Harold G. Enholm Charles E. Hodgdon 

Term expires 1932 Term expires 1930 

Assessors 
Edward A. Maxfield, Chairman 
Term expires 1932 
Clarence B. Humphrey John B. Earp, Secretary 

Term expires 1930 Term expires 1931 

Park Commissioners 
Archibald Miller, Chairman 
Term expires 1930 
Stuart P. Ellis, Secretary Everett P. Mudge 

Term expires 1932 Term expires 1931 

School Committee 

John Vannevar, Chairman 
Term expires 1931 
Eleanor Ingelfinger George C. Thomas 

Term expires 1932 Term expires 1932 

Beatrice Wadleigh Arthur M. Wyman 

Term expires 1930 Term expires 1930 

Trustees of Public Library 
Gustavus J. Esselen, Jr., Chairman 
Term expires 1930 
Jean G. Allan Elihu Thomson 

Term expires 1932 Term expires 1931 

Board of Public Welfare 
Joseph F. Crowell, Chairman 
Term expires 1931 
Edmund Russell, Secretary Harry E. Cahoon 

Term expires 1930 Term expires 1932 

Board of Health 

Dr. Loring Grimes, Chairman 
Term expires 1932 
John B. Cahoon Harold H. Bartol 

Term expires 1930 Term expires 1931 



1929] 



ELECTED TOWN OFFICERS 



3 



Surveyor of Highways 

Michael J. Ryan 
Term expires 1930 

Tree Warden 
Everett P. Mudge 

Constables 

Frank H. Bradford George J. Place Willis E. Shephard 

Commissioners of Trust Funds 
Henry S. Baldwin James W. Libby 

Term expires 1931 Term expires 1932 



TOWN MEETING MEMBERS 



Precinct One 

Term Expires 



G. Edwin Allen 351 Essex street 1931 

James W. Buchanan 69 Cherry street 1932 

Michael J. Cogswell 2 Eliot road 1930 

Ernest Corrado 33 Crescent street 1932 

*John E. Cunningham Windsor avenue 1930 

Ralph J. Curtis 24 Bristol avenue 1931 

Charles S. Doughty 41 Roy street 1932 

William F. Healy 32 Bristol avenue 1930 

Robert B. Hegarty 350 Essex street 1931 

John A. Herbin 346 Essex street 1931 

Alfred B. Jones 102 Essex street 1931 

Franklin H. Keating 29 Greenway 1932 

Arthur Levesque 335 Essex street 1930 

Arthur Morley 26 Minerva street 1930 

Everett P. Mudge 69 Cherry street 1931 

Leroy V. Perry 16 Elwin road 1932 

Leo F. Vaughn 4 Vaughan place 1932 

Leon F. Ximiness 99 Windsor avenue 1930 

Precinct Two 

Joseph B. Abbott 14 Suffolk avenue 1932 

Henry A. Anderson 67 Franklin avenue 1932 

Harold H. Bartol 48 Beach avenue 1931 

James D. Bentley 15 Beach avenue 1931 

Carl J. Berry 39 Essex avenue 1930 

Charles W. Burrill - 34 Maple avenue 1932 

Alfred Ellis 84 Stetson avenue 1931 

James F. Etter 54 Stetson avenue 1932 

Albert F. Fanning 88 Stetson avenue 1930 

Elmer Forrest 75 Essex street 1932 

Roy H. Frye 2 Valley road 1930 

Thomas Handley 95 Stetson avenue 1930 

Charles F. Hathaway 257 Burrill street 1931 

John A. Holmes 8 Essex avenue 1931 

Francis H. Humphreys 35 Pitman road 1931 

Fred A. McKennon 47 Beach avenue 1930 

Martin E. Nies 56 Beach avenue 1930 

Harry W. Stanley 72 Franklin avenue 1932 



4 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



Precinct Three 

***Albert M. Abbott 39 Elmwood road 1932 

LeRoy S. Austin 63 Pine street 1930 

Ralph E. Bicknell 79 Burrill street 1931 

Ernest C. Blanchard 94 Pine street 1930 

Chester A. Brown 17 Middlesex avenue 1930 

Chester P. Brown 176 Burrill street 1932 

Charles V. Burgess 15 Boynton street 1930 

James A. Cook 165 Burrill street 1930 

Willis B. Cressey 140 Burrill street 1932 

Stuart P. Ellis 12 Porter place 1932 

Loring Grimes 84 Humphrey street 1931 

William E. Henry 195 Burrill street 1932 

George H. Knowlton 164 Burrill street 1931 

Harry M. Lowd 90 Burrill street " 1931 

B. Alalcolm Martin 3 Oceanside 1931 

Leland S. Ross 16 Curry circle 1932 

Edmund Russell 189 Burrill street 1931 

Harry A. Tirrell 145 Burrill street 1930 



Precinct Four 

Robert E. Blood 38 Berkshire street 1931 

John B. Cahoon 67 Middlesex avenue 1931 

Edward E. Call ' 60 Thomas road 1931 

Ralph H. Gary 33 Norfolk avenue 1931 

Mervin J. Davis 170 Norfolk avenue 1930 

William G. Fallon 36 Andrew road 1930 

John Fisher 15 Shaw road 1930 

Walter E. Furbush 18 Berkshire street 1931 

George J. Harvey 3 Paton terrace 1932 

Clarence W. Horton 36 Hampden street 1931 

Leon W. Howard 84 Middlesex avenue 1932 

Daniel F. Knowlton 22 Elmwood road 1930 

Robert C. Mansfield 25 Norfolk avenue 1932 

Frank A. Mowatt 102 Farragut road 1930 

William P. Mower 48 Middlesex avenue 1932 

Edward A. Sawyer 56 Middlesex avenue 1932 

Orin L. Smith 42 Berkshire street 1932 

Arthur W. Stubbs 74 Paradise road 1930 



Precinct Five 

Forrest M. Adams 3 Sheridan road 1932 

Henry S. Baldwin 141 Elmwood road 1931 

Alfred B. Brackett 81 Walker road 1932 

Paul W. Brickett 20 Outlook road 1930 

Guy N. Chamberlin 25 Sheridan road 1930 

Harold G. Enholm 4 Sheridan road 1930 

Charles S. Goodridge 34 Walker road 1932 

John B. Hadaway 120 Elmwood road 1930 

Charles E. Hodgdon 95 Banks road 1931 

♦Harry I. Illingworth 71 Walker road 1931 

George B. Learned 12 Banks road 1932 

Florence E. Preston 38 Outlook road 1932 

Kendall A. Sanderson 39 Grant road 1931 

Charles A. Southworth 7 Grant road 1930 

Edwin W. Tibbetts 22 Walker road 1931 

*Edward Tillotson 60 Monument avenue 1930 

George C. Thomas 15 Outlook road 1932 

John Henry Welch 153 Elmwood road 1931 

Philip H. Stafford 26 Banks road 1930 



1929] ELECTED TOWN OFFICERS 5 



Precinct Six 

Charles H. Bangs 293 Humphrey street 1930 

♦♦Nathaniel F. Bartlett 253 Humphrey street 1931 

Benjamin B. Blanchard 108 Greenwood avenue 1931 

PhiHp W. Blood 33 Rockland street 1931 

Eliot A. Bunting 187 Humphrey street 1930 

Warren H. Colby 253 Humphrey street 1932 

Charles B. Edgerly 9 Rose street 1930 

Howard K. Glidden 49 Rockland street 1931 

Loran J. Harvey 55 Blaney street 1932 

Horace C. Holden 5 Greenwood avenue 1931 

Clarence B. Humphrey 12 Humphrey terrace 1930 

Eleanor H. Ingelfinger 5 Cliffside 1932 

Harry D. Linscott 78 Greenwood avenue 1931 

♦Frank S. Newton 30 Fuller avenue 1932 

Donald Redfern 292 Humphrey street 1932 

Frederick J. Rudd 312 Humphrey street 1932 

Michael J. Ryan 39 King street 1930 

Stanley M. Stocker 15 Lawrence terrace 1930 

Precinct Seven 

Joseph Atwood 90 Aspen road 1931 

***Philip E. Bessom 20 Aspen road 1931 

Abram French 646 Humphrey street 1931 

Rufus W. Greene 78 Millett road 1930 

W^alter A. Hall 53 Bay View drive 1930 

John Homan 69 Oceanview road 1932 

Havelock S. Mader 70 Millett road 1931 

Ralph Maxwell 82 Millett road 1930 

George E. Mitchell 64 Magnolia road 1930 

Frank E. Morrison 28 Bay View avenue 1932 

Eben G. Pedrick 60 Orient court 1932 

Roger W. Pope 52 Bay View drive 1932 

Conrad P. Richardson 15 Beverly road 1932' 

James W. Santry 31 Cedar Hill terrace 1931 

George Lloyd Smith Oceanview road 1931 

James C. Soutter 17 Arbutus road 1932 

**Frank H. VanBlarcom 23 Bay View avenue 1930 

Harry E. Whitten 20 Oceanview road 1930 

Precinct Eight 

Louis M. Atherton Tip Top road 1931 

♦Edward T. Brown 182 Atlantic avenue 1930 

Charles H. Cunningham 25 Beach Bluff avenue 1930 

Norman S. Dillingham 15 Eulow street 1931 

Gustavus J. Esselen, Jr. 437 Puritan road 1932 

Stanley D. Forbes 25 Palmer avenue 1930 

George W. Foster 22 Estabrook road 1931 

Frederick A. Hale 48 Crosman avenue 1932 

♦Clarence H. Holloway 58 Phillips avenue 1931 

John R. Hurlburt 40 Beach Bluff avenue 1932 

♦♦Herbert A. Johnson 8 Palmer avenue 1932 

Edward LaCroix 58 Orchard road 1932 

Ralph H. Nutter 21 Mostyn street 1931 

William E. Plummer 150 Atlantic avenue 1930 

Charles I. Porter 2 Palmer avenue 1930 

Alonzo F. Titus 30 Manton road 1932 

John A. Waldo 5 Beach Bluff avenue 1930 

Arthur M. Wyman 2 Beach Bluff avenue 1931 

Robert C. McKay 11 Eulow street 1930 

♦ Deceased 
♦♦ Removed from town 
♦♦♦ Moved to another precinct 



6 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



Appointed Town Officers, 1929 



APPOINTED BY BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Town Accountant and Secretary of Selectmen 

Horace R. Parker 

Assistant Secretary of Selectmen 

Pearl F. Davis 

Town Counsel 

Harry D. Linscott 

Town Engineer 

Wallace W. Pratt 

Superintendent of Cemetery 

Thomas Handley 

Burial Agent 
Ralph D. Merritt 

Superintendent of Moth Work and Forest Warden 

Everett P. Mudge 

Building Inspector 
Harry E. Hardy 

Assistant Building Inspector 

William H. Sutherland 

Inspector of Animals 

Dr. Frank B. Stratton 

. Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Charles Walter Burrill 

Agent and Janitor of Town Hall 

L. Herbert Cahoon 

Dog Officer 

Frank H. Bradford 

Fence Viewer 

George H, Doane 

Inspector of Wires 

James A. Cook 

Inspector of Petroleum 

Dr. Gustavus J. Esselen, Jr. 

State Aid Correspondent 

Horace R. Parker 



1929] 



APPOINTED TOWN OFFICERS 



7 



Board of Registrars 
Frank D. Thurston (D) Chairman William J. Lynch (D) 

Term expires 1931 Term expires 1930 

Ernest B. Thing (R) Ralph D. Merritt, Clerk 

Term expires 1932 Ex-Officio 

Smoke Inspector 

Harry E. Hardy 

Engineers of Fire Department 

James Warnock, Chairman and Chief of Department 
George B. Learned Benjamin B. Blanchard 

Clarence D. Kendrick, Clerk 

Chief of Police — Keeper of Lockup 
Walter F. Reeves 

Special Police 

Philip A. Blanchard John H. Bryson 

Frank H. Bradford C. Walter Burrill 

Ralph H. Burckes Iber L. Chapman 

L. Herbert Cahoon Patrick S. Cryan 

Lewis A. Coleman Robert L. Cunningham 

Daniel B. Collins H. Allen Durkee 

Francis Delano Berton A. Fogg 

George D. R. Durkee Edward R. Grabow 

George Farnum Daniel Grififin 

Stanley D. Forbes Leverett T. Holder 

Thomas Handley Clarence W. Horton 

Herman W. Hay Frank Lally 

Stephen R. Jones James W. Libby 

Bernard B. Kennedy George A. Marlin 

Nathaniel R. Martin James MacDonald 

William McNamara Albert McLellan 

John Muthe James D. Mulligan 

Lemuel W. Pickard Francisco A. Page 

George H. Reed Horace R. Parker 

Joseph P. Ryan Joseph W. Paulson 

Willis E. Shephard George J. Place 

G. Lloyd Smith Fred J. Rowe 

Fred W. Stephenson Timothy J. Ryan 

C. Lee Stover • Simeon J. Strong 

Fred A. Taylor Harry A. Tirrell 

Herbert E, Wood George C. Webster 

Board of Appeals 

Terms expired June 6, 1929 
George M. Glidden, Chairman Clarence E, Cahill 

Charles W. Mowry William O. Titcomb 

Horace R. Parker, Clerk 
Terms expire June 6, 1930 
George M. Glidden, Chairman 
Clarence E. Cahill, resigned Oct. 25, 1929 Thomas S. Bubier 

Ralph Maxwell William O. Titcomb 

Horace R. Parker, Clerk 

Governor's Safety Committee 

The Board of Selectmen 

Board of Survey 

Board of Selectmen Ex-Officio 



8 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



COMMITTEES APPOINTED BY MODERATOR 



Finance 

Precinct 1 Ralph J. Curtis 

Precinct 2 Charles F. Hathaway 

Precinct 3 Chester A. Brown 

Precinct 3 LeRoy S. Austin 

Precinct 4 Ralph H. Cary 

Precinct 5 Paul W. Brickett 

Precinct 6 Donald Redfern 

Precinct 7 James W. Santry, Chairman 

Precinct 8 John A. Waldo 

Fourth of July 

Precinct 1 Charles S. Doughty 

Precinct 2 John A. Holmes 

Precinct 3 George H. Knowlton 

Precinct 4 Robert E. Blood 

Precinct 5 Florence Preston 

Precinct 6 Eleanor Ingelfinger 

Precinct 7 Frank H. Van Blarcom 

Precinct 8 Fred A. Hale 



Term 
Term 

Term 
Term 
Term 
Term 
Term 
Term 



expires 1931 

expires 1931 
Resigned 

expires 1930 

expires 1931 

expires 1930 

expires 1932 

expires 1931 

expires 1930 



Philip W. Blood 
Howard K. Glidden 



Kendall A. Sanderson 



Sewer Rate Investigation 

Harry D. Linscott 
Tercentenary 

Charles H. Bangs 



George D. R. Durkee 
Edward LaCroix 



Henry S. Baldwin 



New High School 

Henry S. Baldwin, Chairman 
Philip E. Bessom H. Allen Durkee Robert C. McKay 

Appointed by School Committee as voted by town: 
George C. Thomas 

New Town Hall 

Precinct 1 G. Edwin Allen 

Precinct 2 Fred A. McKennon 

Precinct 3 Stuart P. Ellis 

Precinct 4 Robert C. Mansfield " 

Precinct 5 George B. Learned 

Precinct 6 Howard K. Glidden 

Precinct 7 Roger W. Pope 

Precinct 8 Gustavus J. Esselen, Jr. 

To Investigate Taking of Land for Park Purposes 

Precinct 1 Robert B. Hegarty 

Precinct 2 James D. Bentley 

Precinct 3 James A. Cook 

Precinct 4 George J. Harvey 

Precinct 5 Henry S. Baldwin 

Precinct 6 Clarence B. Humphrey 

Precinct 7 Joseph Attwood 

Precinct 8 Edward LaCroix 

Assistant Town Clerk 

Nina C. Merritt 



1929] 



RECORDS OF TOWN CLERK 



9 



Records of Town Clerk 



WARRANT FOR SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
Wednesday, January 16, 1929 



Essex, ss. 

To either of the Constables of the town of Swampscott in said County, 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts you are 
directed to notify the inhabitants of the town of Swampscott, qualified 
to vote in elections and in town affairs, to assemble in the Town Hall 
in said Swampscott, on Wednesday, the sixteenth day of January at 
7:30 P. M., then and there to act on the following articles, viz: 

Article 1. To see if the town will accept as a public way the follow- 
ing described way as located and laid out by the Board of Selectmen 
and appciDpriate money therefor; as petitioned for by the School Com- 
mittee: 

Beginning at a point situated on the southerly line of Orchard road, 
said point being the point of reverse curve; thence curving to the left 
with a radius of 154.70 feet, for a distance of 100.86 feet; thence running 
S 76-39-20 W for a distance of 30.00 feet; thence curving to the left with 
a radius of 200.00 feet, for a distance of 44.05 feet to the land formerly 
of Maria S. Hastings recently taken by eminent domain by the town of 
Swampscott; thence N 62-43-50 W by said land formerly of Maria S. 
Hastings for a distance of 59.26 feet; thence curving to the right with 
a radius of 250.00 feet for a distance of 90.65 feet; thence N 76-39-20 E 
for a distance of 30.00 feet; thence curving to the left with a radius of 
24.00 feet, for a distance of 42.81 feet, to the southerly line of Orchard 
road; thence easterly along said southerly line, for a distance of 134.05 
feet to the point of beginning. 

Article 2. To see if the town will vote to take by eminent 
domain, for the purposes of a public way, the premises laid out and 
described in the foregoing article number one in this warrant, and will 
construct a street therein, and appropriate money therefor; as peti- 
tioned for by the School Committee. 

Article 3. To see if the town will vote to erect a public school on 
the premises on Forest avenue, which premises have been taken by the 
town by eminent domain, and appropriate money therefor; as peti- 
tioned for by the School Committee. 

Article 4. To see if the town will appoint a committee with full 
authority to proceed whh the erection of the public school referred to 
in the foregoing article on said premises and to that end to engage an 
architect, obtain plans, advertise for bids, enter into contracts, and 
generally to do any and all things necessary or proper to erect and 
complete such public school, and appropriate money therefor; as peti- 
tioned for by the School Committee. 

Article 5. To see if the town wnll vote to lay water pipes in the 
way laid out by the Selectmen and described in article number one of 
this warrant, and appropriate money therefor; as petitioned for by 
the School Committee. 

Article 6. To see if the town will vote to lay sewer pipes in the 
way laid out by the Selectmen and described in article number one, and 
appropriate money therefor; as petitioned for by the School Committee. 



10 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



Article 7. To appropriate and raise by borrowing or otherwise, 
under any general or special law which authorizes the town to raise 
money by borrowing or otherwise, such sum or sums of money as 
may be necessary for any or all of the purposes mentioned in the fore- 
going articles. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an attested 
copy thereof at the Town Hall, the post offices, at least one public and 
conspicuous place in each precinct in the town, and at or in the imme- 
diate vicinity of each railroad station in the town, seven days before 
the day appointed for said meeting. 

Hereof Fail Not, and make due return of this warrant, with your 
doings thereon, to the Town Clerk at the time and place of meeting 
aforesaid. 

Given under our hands this thirty-first day of December, A. D. 1928. 

HOWARD K. GLIDDEN, 
R. WYER GREENE, 
DANIEL F. KNOWLTON, 

Selectmen of Swampscott. 

A true copy: Attest: 

FRANK H. BRADFORD, 

Constable. 



FINANCE COMMITTEE APPOINTMENT 

January 11, 1929. 
Kendall A. Sanderson, Moderator, appointed Ralph H. Cary, 33 
Norfolk avenue. Precinct 4, a member of the Finance Committee, to 
fill the vacancy caused by resignation of John R. Hurlburt. 
Attest: 

RALPH D. MERRITT, 

Town Clerk. 



RETURN ON THE WARRANT 

Pursuant to the within warrant to me directed, I have notified the 
legal voters of Swampscott by posting attested copies of said warrant 
at the Town Hall, Post Offices, at least one public and conspicuous 
place in each precinct in the town and at or in the immediate vicinity 
of each railroad station in Swampscott on Monday, January 7, 1929, the 
posting of said notices being seven days before the time of said meeting. 

FRANK H. BRADFORD, 
Constable. 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
Wednesday, January 16, 1929 

In accordance with the warrant the meeting was called to order by 
Kendall A. Sanderson, Moderator, the necessary quorum being present. 

Voted, to dispense with reading of the warrant except the return 
thereon. Return on warrant was read by Town Clerk. 

The Finance report was read by James W. Santry. 

Report of the Finance Committee 

Article 1. The purpose of this article is to provide an approach to 
the public school building to be erected upon land located in Forest 
avenue, which was recently taken by the Board of Selectmen at a meet- 
ing held December 14, 1928, for the purpose of erecting a public school 
thereon in pursuance of a vote of the town under Article 1 of the 
warrant for the special town meeting held November 14, 1928. 



1929] 



RECORDS OF TOWN CLERK 



We recommend that the way described in this article as laid out 
by the Board of Selectmen be accepted as a public way, and that the 
sum of eighteen hundred dollars be appropriated from the tax levy 
of the current year for the building thereof. 

Article 2. Everything sought by this article is covered by Article 1 
and we therefore recommend that consideration of this article be in- 
definitely postponed. 

Article 3. We recommend that this article be considered with 
Article 4. 

Articles 3 and 4. The land in Forest avenue, to which reference is 
made in Article 3, was taken by the Board of Selectmen at a meeting 
of the Board held December 14, 1928, in pursuance of a vote passed 
at the special town meeting held November 14, 1928. 
~ When this matter was under discussion at the preceding town 
meetings a school building containing six class rooms and an assembly 
hall was the type of building that was then considered. The School 
Committee now believes that the school population of the comrnunity 
that this building is designed to accommodate, will increase, and there- 
fore recommends the erection of a building with eight class rooms and 
an assembly hall. The sketches that have been submitted to the School 
Committee show such a building with an assembly hall to accommodate 
four hundred persons. Estimates submitted to us through the School 
Committee indicate that the cost of this building will be one hundred 
fifteen thousand dollars ($115,000) which will include the installation of 
heating, plumbing, ventilating, lighting, the finished grading of the 
land, the equipment that is usually installed in a building of this type, 
and the architect's fee. The building itself will be of brick. 

No architect has been selected, but two architects have submitted 
sketches to this Committee. We are informed by the School Committee 
that this has been done with the distinct understanding that no obliga- 
tion, either of a financial or moral nature, has been incurred through the 
submission of these sketches. 

We recommend that a committee, consisting of one member of the 
School Committee, one member of the Board of Selectmen, John A. 
Waldo, a member of the Finance Committee from Precinct 8, and two 
voters of the town, be appointed by the moderator to attend to the 
erection of a public school building on the above mentioned land to 
contain eight rooms and an assembly hall to accommodate approxi- 
mately four hundred persons, and the necessary and usual appurte- 
nances and conveniences pertaining to the use of said building for 
school purposes; that said Committee be and hereby is authorized to 
employ an architect to provide suitable plans and specifications for said 
building, and to make all contracts for the erection of said building, and 
for the heating, plumbing, ventilating, and lighting thereof, and for the 
purchase and installation of all necessary and usual equipment in 
connection therewith, such as desks, chairs, blackboards, wardrobes, 
and the usual equipment and conveniences for teachers; and to make 
all contracts for the finished grading of said premises, and generally 
to arrange and complete all matters relating to the entire subject; and 
that for the above mentioned purposes the sum of one hundred fifteen 
thousand dollars be raised by bonds or notes of the town. 

Articles 5 and 6. We have not been furnished with sufficiently 
accurate information concerning the subjects covered by these articles 
to permit us to make a definite recommendation. 

We therefore recommend that action under these articles be in- 
definitely postponed and that the Board of Selectmen cause to be in- 
serted in the warrant for the Annual Town Meeting appropriate articles 
relating to the matters described in these articles. 

Article 7. We recommend, for the purposes specified in articles 
3 and 4 and the votes thereunder, which relate to the appropriation of 
one hundred fifteen thousand dollars for the erection of a public school 
building, that six thousand dollars thereof be raised from the tax levy 



12 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



-of the current year in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 338 
of the Acts of 1923, and all acts in amendment thereof and in addition 
thereto, and that the treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen be 
.authorized to borrow a sum not to exceed the remainder, viz: one 
hundred nine thousand dollars, and to issue bonds or notes of the town 
therefor; said bonds or notes shall be signed by the Treasurer and 
.countersigned by a majority of the Selectmen, and shall be issued and 
payable in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 44 of the General 
Laws and all acts in amendment thereof and in addition thereto, so that 
the whole loan shall be paid in not more than twenty years from the 
date of the issue of the first bond or note or at such earlier dates as 
the Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen may determine; said 
bonds or notes shall be denominated on the face thereof: "Swampscott 
- - - School Loan, 1929," and shall bear such rates of interest as may 
be fixed by the Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen. 

JAMES W. SAXTRY, 
FREDERICK J..RUDD, 
RALPH J. CURTIS, 
FRANK HATHAWAY, 
JOHN A. WALDO, 
CHESTER A. BROW^N, 
PAUL W. BRICKET, 
RALPH H. CARY. 

Finance Committee. 
Voted, Article 1. That the Board of Selectmen be authorized to 
lay out the street as described in Article 1 between now and date of 
annual meeting, and insert an article in the warrant for its acceptance 
by the town. 

Voted, Article 2. To accept the Finance Committee report, and 
adopt their recommendations as amended: 

That the Board of Selectmen be authorized to take in fee for the 
purpose of a public way the land described in Article 1 and that the 
sum of $300 be appropriated therefor from its tax lev}- for the current 
year. (Unanimous.) 

Voted, that Articles 3 and 4 be taken up together. 

Voted, that the Building Inspector be added to the committee as 
one of the two voters of the town, this being an amendment to the 
Finance Committee report. 

Voted, to accept the report of the Finance Committee and adopt 
their recommendations as amended. 

That a committee, consisting of one member of the School Com- 
mittee, one member of the Board of Selectmen, John A. Waldo, a 
member of the Finance Comrnittee from Precinct Eight, the Building 
Inspector, and one voter of the town, be appointed by the moderator 
to attend to the erection of a public school building on the above men- 
tioned land to contain eight rooms and an assembly hall to accommo- 
date approximateh' four hundred persons, and the necessary and usual 
appurtenances and conveniences pertaining to the use of said building 
for school purposes; that said Committee be and hereby is authorized 
to emplo}- an architect to provide suitable plans and specifications for 
said building, and to make all contracts for the erection of said building, 
and for the heating, plumbing, ventilating and lighting thereof, and for 
the purchase and installation of all necessar}^ and usual equipment in 
connection therewith, such as desks, chairs, blackboards, wardrobes, and 
the usual equipment and conveniences for the teachers; and to make 
all contracts for the finished grading of said premises, and generally to 
arrange and complete all matters relating to the entire subject; and 
that for the above mentioned purposes the sum of one hundred fifteen 
thousand dollars be raised by bonds or notes of the town. For, 74; 
against, 0. (Unanimous.) 

Articles 5 and 6 taken up together. Voted that action under these 
articles be indefinitely postponed and that the Board of Selectmen cause 



1929] 



RECORDS OF TOWN CLERK 



13 



to be inserted in the warrant for the Annual Town Meeting appropriate 
articles relating to the matter described in these articles. 

Voted, Article 7. To accept the report of the Finance Committee- 
and adopt their recommendations as follows: 

For the purposes specified in Articles 3 and 4 and the votes there- 
under, which relate to the appropriation of one hundred fifteen thousand, 
dollars for the erection of a public school building, that six thousand 
dollars thereof be raised from the tax levy of the current year in 
accordance with the provisions of Chapter 338 of the Acts of 1923, and. 
all acts in amendment thereof and in addition thereto, and that the 
Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen be authorized to borrow 
a sum not to exceed the remainder, viz: one hundred nine thousand, 
dollars, and to issue bonds or notes of the town therefor; said bonds or 
notes shall be signed by the Treasurer and countersigned by a majority 
of the Selectmen, and shall be issued payable in accordance with the 
provisions of Chapter 44 of the General Laws and all acts in amend- 
ment thereof and in addition thereto, so that the whole loan shall be 
paid in not more than twenty A-ears from the date of the issue of the 
first bond or note or at such earlier dates as the Treasurer with the 
approval of the Selectmen may determine; said bonds or notes shall 
be denominated on the face thereof: "Swampscott - - - School Loan 
1929" and shall bear such rates of interest as may be fixed by the 
Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen. For, 74; against, 0.- 
(Unanimous.) 

Voted to dissolve at 9 P. M. 
Attest: 

RALPH D. MERRITT, 

Town Clerk. 



SCHOOL BUILDING COMMITTEE 

January 16, 1929. 
In accordance with the vote passed at the Special Town Meeting 
held on the above date, the following were appointed on the Building 
Committee for the new school building: 

George Mitchell, from the School Committee. 
Daniel F. Knowlton, from the Board of Selectmen. 
John A. Waldo, from the Finance Committee. 
Harry E. Hardy, Building Inspector. 
John E. Chatman, by the Moderator. 
Attest: 

RALPH D. MERRITT, 

Town Clerk. 



APPOINTED TO FILL VACANCY 

January 26, 1929. 
Ralph H. Nutter appointed by Kendall A. Sanderson, Moderator^, 
on Building Committee of new Palmer School, in place of John E- 
Chatman, who resigned from said committee. 
Attest: 

RALPH D. MERRITT, ^ 
Town Clerk. 



RESIGNS FROM COMMITTEE 

February 4, 1929. 
Resignation of George E. Mitchell, from Building Committee oi 
new Palmer School, received on above date, as his term of oflFice as- 
School Committee member expires this month, and not being a candi- 
date for re-election. 

Attest: 

RALPH D. MERRITT, 

Town Clerk,. 



14 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



ARTHUR M. WYMAN NAMED 

February 12, 1929. 
Kendall A. Sanderson, Moderator of the town of Swampscott, ap- 
pointed Arthur M, Wyman a member of the Building Committee for 
new Palmer School in place of George E, Mitchell, who resigned from 
rsaid committee. 

Attest: 

RALPH D. MERRITT, 

Town Clerk. 



WARRANT FOR TOWN MEETING 
Monday, February 18th, 1929 

Essex, ss. 

To either of the Constables of the town of Swampscott in said County: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts you are 
directed to notify the inhabitants of the town of Swampscott, qualified 
to vote in elections and in town affairs, to assemble in their respective 
precincts, in said Swampscott, on Monday, the eighteenth day of 
February, at 6 A. M., then and there to act on the following articles, viz.: 
At the close of the election the meeting shall adjourn to Monday, 
February 25, 1929, at 7:30 P. M., at the Town Hall. 

Article 1. To choose a Moderator for one (1) year. 
To choose a Town Clerk for one (1) year. 
To choose three members of the Board of Selectmen for 

one (1) year. 
To choose a Town Treasurer for one (1) year. 
To choose one member of the Board of Assessors for three 
(3) years. 

To choose a Collector of Taxes for one (1) year. 
To choose two members of the School Committee for three 
(3) years. 

To choose one member of the School Committee for one (1) 

year, to fill vacancy. 
To choose one member of the Board of Public Welfare for 

three (3) years. 
To choose one member of the Board of Health for three (3) 

years. 

To choose one member of the Water and Sewerage Board for 

three (3) years. 
To choose one member of the Park Commission for three 

(3) years. 

To choose one member of the Board of Trustees of the Pub- 
lic Library for three (3) years. ^ 

To choose one member of the Board of Trustees of the Pub- 
lic Library for one (1) year to fill vacancy. 

To choose one Tree Warden for one (1) year. 

To choose three Constables for one (1) year. 

To choose one member of the Board of Commissioners of 
Trust Funds for three (3) years. 

To choose one member of the Board of Commissioners of 
Trust Funds for two (2) years, to fill vacancy. 

To choose one member of the Board of Commissioners of 
Trust Funds for one (1) year, to fill vacancy. 

To choose six (6) representative town meeting members in 
each precinct for three (3) years. 

To choose one representative town meeting member from 
Precinct Three for two (2) years, to fill vacancy. 

To choose one representative town meeting member from 
Precinct Four for one (1) year, to fill vacancy. 



1929] 



RECORDS OF TOWN CLERK 



15 



To choose one representative town meeting member from 

Precinct Seven for two (2) years, to fill vacancy. 
All to be chosen on one ballot. 
Art. 2. To hear and act on the reports of town officials, boards and 
committees. 

Art. 3. To see what amount of bonds will be required of the Town 
Clerk and Custodian of Trust Funds for the ensuing year. 

Art. 4. To see what action the town will take in relation to salaries 
of town officials for the ensuing year. 

Art. 5. To see if the town will authorize the Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money, from time to time, in 
anticipation of the revenue of the financial year, beginning January 1, 
1929, and to issue a note or notes therefor, payable within one year, the 
debt or debts incurred thereby to be paid from the revenue of said 
financial year. 

Art. 6. To see what action the town will take in relation to the 
recommendations not calling for the appropriation of money as con- 
tained in the annual report of the following officers, boards and com- 
mittees: Committee on Chief of Police, page 168; Board of Appeals, 
page 228; Board of Selectmen, page 210;' Planning Committee, page 231; 
Purchasing Committee, page 232. 

Art. 7. To see what action the town will take in relation to the 
recommendations calling for the appropriation, or expenditure of money, 
the creation of a debt, or the disposition of town property as set forth 
in the report of officers, boards, and committees in the annual report as 
follows: Water and Sewerage Board, page 132; Board of Health, page 
136; Health Officer, page 138; Trustees of Public Library, page 151; 
Supt. of Cemetery, page 161; Chief of Police, page 168; Fire Engineers, 
page 175; Surveyor of Highways, page 179; Board of Selectmen, page 
210; Stable Committee, page 233; High School Committee, page 225. 

Art. 8. To see what action the town will take in relation to the 
appropriation of money for departmental and other expenses as recom- 
mended and set forth on pages 216, 217 and 218 of the annual town 
report. 

Art. 9. To see if the town will vote to permanently surface Frank- 
lin avenue, from Stetson avenue to Paradise (State) road, with bitumin- 
ous macadam construction, in accordance wnth specifications approved 
by the Division of Highways of the State Department of Public Works, 
and appropriate or raise money therefor, as petitioned for by Harry 
W. Stanley et als. 

Art. 10. To see if the town will vote that sufficient money be 
appropriated to provide for hard surfacing Puritan avenue and Puritan 
Park, from Puritan road to Atlantic road, and Atlantic road from 
Atlantic avenue to Puritan avenue, as petitioned for by Angus H. Mac- 
Donald et als. 

Art. lU To see if the town will vote that Puritan road, from the 
westerly intersection with Humphrey street to the way to the beach at 
the easterly end of Whale's Beach, be reshaped and surfaced, and appro- 
priate money therefor, as recommended by the Surveyor of Highways, 

Art. 12. To see what action the town will take in relation to the 
appropriation or raising of money for permanent street construction. 

Art. 13. To see if the town will vote to request the Board of 
Selectmen to change the lines of Bay View avenue and Cedar Hill 
terrace for the purpose of increasing the width of these waj-s at their 
northerly junction, and appropriate money therefor. 

Art. 14. To see if the town will vote to blast out the ledge which 
extends out on the sidewalk, on the southern side of Crescent street, a 
distance of about 25 feet, and appropriate therefor the sum of $250.00, 
as petitioned for by Ernest Corrado et als. 

Art. 15. To see if the town will vote to widen a section of Buena 
Vista street, a distance of about 300 feet, easterly, starting at a point 
near Crescent street, and appropriate or raise money therefor, as peti- 
tioned for by Ernest Corrado et als. 



16 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



Art. 16. To see if the town will vote to build a catch basin on 
Puritan road and drain through the way to the beach at the easterly 
end of Whale's Beach, for the purpose of caring for surface water on 
Puritan road, and appropriate money therefor, as recommended by the 
Surveyor of Highways. 

Art. 17. To see if the town will vote that a catch basin be built to 
drain land on Cherry street, at the corner of Hillside avenue, and 
appropriate money therefor, as recommended by the Surveyor of 
Highways. 

Art. 18. To see if the town will vote to lay a drain to care for 
surface drainage which accumulates on Humphrey street at and near 
the corner of Forest avenue, and appropriate or raise money therefor, 
as petitioned for by Wilmot R. Hastings et als. 

Art. 19. To see if the town will vote to instruct the Surveyor of 
Highways to build a manhole and construct a gate in the outlet to 
Palmer's pond for the purpose of keeping said outlet clear, and appro- 
priate money therefor. 

Art. 20. To see if the town will vote to lay a drain to care for 
surface water from Aspen road, and appropriate money for the same. 

Art. 21. To see if the town will accept as a public way the follow- 
ing described way as located and laid out by the Board of Selectmen, 
and appropriate money therefor; as petitioned for by the School Com- 
mittee: 

Beginning at a point situated on the southerly line of Orchard road, 
said point being the point of reverse curve: thence curving to the left 
with a radius of 154.70 feet, for a distance of 100.86 feet: thence running 
S 76-39-20 W for a distance of 30.00 feet: thence curving to the left with 
a radius of 200.00 feet, for a distance of 44.05 feet to the land formerly 
of Maria S. Hastings recently taken by eminent domain by the town of 
Swampscott; thence X 62-43-50 W by said land formerly of Maria S. 
Hastings for a distance of 59.26 feet; thence curving to the right with 
a radius of 250.00 feet for a distance of 90.65 feet; thence N 76-39-20 E 
for a distance of 30.00 feet; thence curving to the left with a radius of 
24.00 feet, for a distance of 42.81 feet, to the southerly line of Orchard 
road; thence easterly along said southerly line, for a distance of 134.05 
feet to the point of beginning. 

Art. 22. To see if the town will vote to accept Lewis road as laid 
out by the Board of Selectmen in accordance with a plan made by 
"V\^. \V. Pratt, Town Engineer, dated January, 1929, and appropriate 
money therefor, as petitioned for by S. Perr}' Congdon et als. 

Art. 23. To see if the town will vote to accept Prospect avenue as 
laid out on a plan made by \V. \V. Pratt, Town Engineer, dated Jan- 
uary, 1929. and appropriate money therefor, as petitioned for by Ernest 
C. Sherburne et als. 

Art. 24. To see if the town will vote to accept Xason road as laid 
out by the Board of Selectmen in accordance with a plan drawn by 
\V. W. Pratt, Town Engineer, dated January, 1929, and appropriate 
or raise money therefor, as petitioned for by Frank E. Falkins et als. 

Art. 25. To see if the town will vote to accept Cedar road as laid 
out by the Board of Selectmen in accordance wMth a plan drawn by 
\V. W. Pratt, Town Engineer, dated January, 1929, and appropriate 
or raise money therefor, as petitioned for by Frank E. Falkins et als. 

Art. 26. To see if the town will vote to accept Stanley road as laid 
out by the Board of Selectmen in accordance with a plan made by 
W. W. Pratt, Town Engineer, dated January. 1929, and appropriate 
money therefor, as petitioned for by William D. Rowe et als. 

Art. 27. To see if the town will vote to accept Francis road as laid 
out by the Board of Selectmen in accordance with a plan made by 
W. W. Pratt. Town Engineer, dated January, 1929, and appropriate 
money therefor, as petitioned for by Arthur S. Putnam et als. 



1929] 



RECORDS OF TOWN CLERK 



17 



Art. 28. To see if the town will vote to accept Oceanview^ road as 
laid out by the Board of Selectmen in accordance with a plan made by 
W. W. Pratt, Town Engineer, dated January, 1929, and appropriate 
money therefor, as petitioned for by Henry James Connell et als. 

Art. 29. To see if the town will vote to accept Bay View Drive as 
laid out by the Board of Selectmen in accordance with a plan made by 
W. W. Pratt, Town Engineer, dated January, 1929, and appropriate 
money therefor, as petitioned for by Caroline R, T. Hobbs et als. 

Art. 30. To see if the town will vote to extend the trunk line sewer 
to Salem street and Beach Bluff avenue, approximately 5300 feet, and 
appropriate money therefor, as recommended by the Water and Sew- 
erage Board. 

Art. 31. To see if the town will vote to construct a sewer in 
Phillips avenue, from Estabrook road to Stanwood road, a distance of 
1100 feet, and appropriate money therefor, as recommended by the 
Water and Sewerage Board. 

Art. 32. To see if the town will vote to construct a sewer in 
Bradlee avenue and Atlantic avenue (southwesterly) from Ocean ave- 
nue, a distance of 1965 feet, and appropriate money therefor, as recom- 
mended by the Water and Sewerage Board. 

Art. 33. To see if the town will vote to construct a sewer in 
Humphrey street and Ocean avenue, a distance of 450 feet, and appro- 
priate money therefor, as recommended by the Water and Sewerage 
Board. 

Art. 34. To see if the town will vote to construct a sewer in 
Bristol avenue for a distance of approximately 400 feet from Stetson 
avenue, and appropriate money therefor, as recommended by the Water 
and Sewerage Board. 

Art. 35. To see if the town will vote to construct a sewer in the 
following named streets: — Sargent road and Prospect avenue, a distance 
of approximately 400 feet from Aspen road, and appropriate money 
therefor, as recommended by the Water and Sewerage Board. 

x\rt. 36. To see if the town will vote to construct a sewer in 
Barnstable street for a distance of approximately 225 feet from Stetson 
avenue, and appropriate money therefor, as recommended by the Water 
and Sewerage Board. 

Art. 37. To see if the town will vote to lay sewer pipes in the way 
laid out by the Selectmen and described in article number twenty-one, 
and appropriate money therefor, as petitioned for by the School Com- 
mittee. 

Art. 38. To see if the town will vote to extend the King's Brook 
Culvert from the railroad to Essex street, a distance of 1250 feet, and 
appropriate money therefor, as recommended by the Water and Sew- 
erage Board. 

Art. 39. To see if the town will vote to lay a six inch w^ater main 
in Duke street, from Stetson avenue, a distance of about 400 feet, and to 
appropriate money therefor, as petitioned for by James H. Sisk et als. 

Art. 40. To see if the town will vote to lay a six inch water main 
in Plymouth avenue from the end of the main now laid in said avenue, 
a distance of about 250 feet, and to appropriate money therefor, as 
petitioned for by James H. Sisk et als. 

Art. 41. To see if the town will vote to install a water main on 
a new street to be known as Hoover road, for a distance of about 500 
feet northerly from Forest avenue, and appropriate money therefor, as 
petitioned for by F. E. Morrison et als. 

Art. 42. To see if the town will vote to lay water pipes in the 
way laid out by the Selectmen and described in article number twenty- 
one of this warrant, and appropriate money therefor, as petitioned for 
by the School Committee. 

Art. 43. To see if the town will vote to place a fire alarm box near 
the corner of Kensington lane and Lewis road and appropriate money 
therefor as petitioned for by S. Perry Congdon et als. 



18 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



Art. 44. To see if the town will vote to place a fire alarm box near 
the corner of Humphrey street and Harrison avenue and appropriate 
money therefor, as petitioned for by William J. Hayward et als. 

Art. 45. To see if the town will vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen and the Chief of Police to make a contract for the erection 
of a building near, or as an addition to, the present police station, with 
accommodations for the care and detention of persons arrested by the 
police department, and appropriate money therefor. 

Art. 46. To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law 
by changing from a general residence to a business district the area 
included between Humphrey street and the sea and Clififside avenue and 
Blaney (Fisherman's) beach, so that the said area shall then be subject 
to the provisions of Article IV of said Zoning By-Law, as petitioned 
for by Ellen M. Ward well et als. 

Art. 47. To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law 
by changing the word "district" to "districts" and inserting the numeral 
"1" and the word "and" between the word "district" and the numeral 
"2" wherever "district 2" appears in the Zoning By-Law, so that the 
By-Law as amended will then read as follows: . 

ARTICLE II 
General Residence District 
In districts 1 and 2, except as herein otherwise provided no building 
shall be used, and no building shall be erected or altered which is in- 
tended or designed to be used for a store or shop, or for manufacturing 
or commercial purposes, or any other purpose except one or more of 
the following: 

1. Residence for not more than two families. 

2. Boarding, rooming, or lodging house. 

3. Church. 

4. Public school or other municipal building. 

5. Private school, library, museum, or other building of an edu- 
cational character. 

6. Club, except a club which carries on a business or is in the 
nature of a business. 

7. Park, playground, or community purpose. 

8. Farm, market garden, nursery or greenhouse. 

9. Private garage to be used by the occupants or owners of the 
premises, except that space in the same for not more than two cars 
may be rented. 

10. Private stable with provision for not more than two horses. 

11. Such accessory purposes as are customarily incident to the 
foregoing purposes, and are not injurious to a neighborhood as a place 
of residence, but such accessory purposes shall not include any business, 
industry, trade, manufacturing or commercial purpose, 

ARTICLE IV 
Business Districts 
In those areas in Districts 1 and 2 and indicated on the accom- 
panying map in solid black, buildings may be used for business purposes 
provided that, in each case, after a public hearing of which fourteen 
days' notice shall be given in such manner as the Board of Selectmen 
may prescribe, said board shall determine that the purpose for which 
the building is sought to be used will not be substantially detrimental 
to the use of the property in the vicinity thereof. 

ARTICLE VII 
Setback Distance in General Residence District 
In Districts 1 and 2 no new buildings except those described in 
Article 4 shall be constructed and no building shall be altered, enlarged, 
extended, reconstructed, raised, or moved so that any part thereof, 
except steps, shall be located nearer than ten feet to any street line. 

And to further amend Article I by inserting between the word 
viz., and the numeral 2, the following: "1. General Residence District," 
«o that said Article I shall then read as follows: 



.1929] 



RECORDS OF TOWN CLERK 



19 



ARTICLE I 
Authorization and Division 
By virtue and in pursuance of the powers delegated by Section 25 to 
Section 33, inclusive, of Chapter 40 of the General Law^s, the town of 
Swampscott is divided into the following districts, viz., 1, General Resi- 
dence District; 2, General Residence District; 3, Single Residence Dis- 
trict. 

And to further amend Article VI by adding a second paragraph 
reading as follows: "A zoning map of district 1, prepared by W. W. 
Pratt, Town Engineer, dated January, 1929, bearing the signatures of 
the committee under whose direction the district has been laid out, is 
declared to be a part of this By-Law." 

Art. 48. To see if the town will vote to appoint a committee, con- 
sisting of one town meeting member from each precinct, to be named 
from the floor, to investigate the matter of taking of land on Black Wills 
Cliff, between Humphrey street and the ocean, and King's beach and 
Blaney's beach, for park or public purposes, with instructions to report 
at a later town meeting during the present year, as petitioned for by 
Henry S. Baldwin et als. 

Art. 49. To see if the town will vote to appoint a committee to 
investigate the needs of a new Town Hall and report at the adjourned 
town meeting, as petitioned for by Frank E. Morrison et als. 

Art. 50. To see if the town will vote to construct a vault at the 
Town Hall, and appropriate or raise money for the same. 

Art. 51. To see if the town will vote that sufficient money be 
appropriated for supplying oil and employing other methods to reduce 
the mosquito breeding in Palmer's pond and surrounding marshes, as 
petitioned for by Angus H. MacDonald et als. 

Art. 52. To see if the town will vote to increase the salaries of 
the members of the Water and Sewerage Board to the same amount as 
received by the Selectmen, as recommended by the Water and Sewerage 
Board. 

Art. 53. To see if the town will vote to increase the pay of the 
captains in the Police Department two hundred dollars ($200) per year, 
and appropriate money for the same, as petitioned for by Edward 
Tillotson et als. 

Art. 54. To see if the town will vote to transfer the following un- 
expended balances to the Emergency Sewer fund: Walker road sewer, 
$1,208.03; Franklin avenue sewer, $5,851.36; Fuller avenue sewer, $605.97, 
and Eastern Intercepting sewer, $9.06, as recommended by the Water 
and Sewerage Board. 

Art. 55. To see if the town will vote to transfer the sum of $801.90 
from the account of Redington Street School to the account of new 
Palmer School for the preliminary work of the committee appointed to 
construct said school. 

Art. 56. To see if the town will vote to appropriate the sum of 
$1000 for the observance of the Fourth of July. 

Art. 57. To see if the town will vote to observe the Town Ter- 
centenary during the summer of 1929, and appropriate money therefor. 

Art. 58. To see if the town will vote to appropriate the sum of 
$163.97 for the purpose of paying the final estimate of Contractor P. J. 
McDermott for work done in Swampscott cemetery during the year 1927. 

Art. 59. To see if the town will vote to appropriate the sum of 
$4,755, or such sum as may be assessed by the County Commissioners, 
as the town's proportion of the deficit caused by the closing of the 
Tremont Trust Co. in 1921, when and if authorized by the Legislature. 

Art. 60. To see if the town will appropriate the sum of $400.00 
" each year for the purpose of heating and lighting the American Legion, 
Leon E. Abbott Post quarters, as petitioned for by Richard H. Mc- 
Namara et als. 

Art. 61. To see if the town will appropriate the sum of $200 for 
the expenses of the Veterans of Foreign Wars in properly celebrating 
Memorial Day, as petitioned for by Franklin H. Keating et als. 



20 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



Art. 62. To appropriate and raise by borrowing or otherwise, 
under any general or special law which authorizes the town to raise 
money by borrowing or otherwise, such sum or sums of money as may 
be necessary for any or all of the purposes mentioned in the foregoing 
articles. 

The polls will close at 6 P. M. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an attested 
copy thereof at the Town Hall, the post offices, at least one public and 
conspicuous place in each precinct in the town, and at or in the imme- 
diate vicinit}' of each railroad station in the town, seven days before 
the day appointed for said meeting. 

Hereof fail not, and make due return of this warrant, with your 
doings thereon, to the Town Clerk at the time and place of meeting 
aforesaid. 

HOWARD K. GLIDDEN, 
R. WYER GREENE, 
DANIEL F. KNOWLTON, 

Selectmen of Swampscott. 
Given under our hands this eighteenth day of January, A. D. 1929. 
A true copy. Attest: 

FRANK H. BRADFORD, Constable. 



RETURN ON THE WARRANT 

Pursuant to the within warrant to me directed, I have notified the 
legal voters of Swampscott by posting attested copies of said warrant 
at the Town Hall, Post Offices, at least one public and conspicuous 
place in each precinct in the town, and at or in the immediate vicinity 
of each railroad station in Swampscott, on Monday, February 11, 1929, 
the posting of said notices being seven days before the time of said 
meeting. 

FRANK H. BRADFORD, 

Constable. 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

February 18, 1929 

In accordance with the foregoing warrant the voters of Swampscott 
assembled at the voting places in the several precincts and were called 
to order at 6 o'clock A. M., by the presiding officers, the warrant calling 
the meeting with the return thereon being read by the clerk in each 
precinct. 

The following were appointed precinct officers and qualified for 
same: 

Precinct 1. Edward H. Jordan, Warden; Robert B, Hegarty, 
Clerk; Robert L. Cunningham, Lewis A. Coleman, Inspectors; Addie F. 
Nelson, John D. Healey, Charles A. Bryson, William H. Dow, Tellers. 

Precinct 2. James D. Bentley, Warden; John E. Coville, Clerk; 
William P. Norcross, John H. Burns, Inspectors; Martha F. Duren, 
Mary G. Stone, Belle M. Walsh, Louis Sherman, Tellers. 

Precinct 3. Edmund Young, Jr., Warden; Albert Stone, Clerk; 
Milton E. Morrill, Robert L. Douglass, Inspectors; Charles E. Melzard, 
Chester Lowe, Harold R. Young, Burton R. Carroll, Tellers. 

Precinct 4. Lewis N. Crocker, Warden; Donald L. Sanger, Clerk; 
John B. Cahoon, Charles E. Souther, Inspectors; Warren P. Melzard, 
James W. Robertson, Thomas T. McManus, Bessie F. Maguire, Tellers. 

Precinct 5. Albert Enholm, Warden; Raymond H. Owen, Clerk; 
L. Kehoe, Irving A. Curtis, Inspectors; Alice E. Leslie, Winnifred G. 
Jacobs, Mary G. Boyce, John T. Morrison, Tellers. 



1929] 



RECORDS OF TOWN CLERK 



21 



Precinct 6. Herman E. Story, Warden; Timothy J. Ryan, Clerk; 
Arthur C. Eaton, George H. Coan, Inspectors; John T. Merchant, 
Harry G. Hutchinson, John T. McDermott, Mary Turner, Tellers. 

Precinct 7. Henry J. Burt, Warden; James D. Mulligan, Clerk; 
Walter Lofmark, Charles J. Dolan, Inspectors; Charles L. Martin, 
Helen E. Peach, Helen A. Parker, Tellers. 

Precinct 8. Charles A. Flagg, Warden; Mary Collins, Clerk; 
Sehvyn P. Drown, Olive Flagg, Inspectors; Cyril Gannon, Mary Donlan, 
Tellers. 

The balloting was started at 6 o'clock A. M., the count started at 
2 o'clock P. M. The ballot boxes registered correctly and the checks on 
the voting lists were the same as the votes cast. Polls closed at 6 
o'clock. 

There were cast in Precinct 1, 285; Precinct 2, 268; Precinct 3, 265; 
Precinct 4, 249; Precinct 5, 253; Precinct 6, 311; Precinct 7, 324; Pre- 
cinct 8, 303; total vote cast, 2258. Result of the balloting was declared 
at 8:30 P. M. 

Precinct 5 was the first to make their returns at 6:20 P. M. and 
Precinct 6 the last at 7:50 P. M. 
For Moderator: 

Precincts 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Tot. 

John R. Hurlburt, elected 177 188 185 187 203 206 214 253 1613 

Blanks 108 80 80 62 50 105 110 50 645 

For Town Clerk: 

Ralph D. Merritt, elected 194 189 207 203 214 241 223 261 1732 

Blanks 91 79 58 46 39 70 101 42 526 

For Selectmen: 

Howard K. Glidden, elected 114 140 131 141 164 197 182 172 1241 
R. Wyer Greene, elected 95 113 111 127 142 180 157 128 1053 

Daniel F. Knowlton, elected 114 111 130 105 89 130 115 90 884 
Frederick J. Rudd 87 68 92 86 103 140 122 134 832 

C. Frank Hathaway 102 165 112 99 62 53 89 44 726 

Edward LaCroix 31 32 46 49 83 83 80 179 583 

Ernest Corrado 112 47 52 47 44 53 86 41 482 

Joseph B. Abbott 63 57 41 35 14 14 25 24 273 

Blanks ' 137 71 80 58 58 83 116 97 700 

For Treasurer: 

James W. Libbv, elected 199 214 224 216 213 248 244 262 1820 

Blanks 86 54 41 33 40 63 80 41 438 

For Assessor for 3 years: 
Edward A. Maxfield, elected 191 208 211 202 216 237 221 246 1732 
Blanks 94 60 54 47 37 74 103 57 526 

For Tax Collector: 
Ralph D. Merritt, elected 190 210 217 207 204 241 231 259 1759 

Blanks 95 58 48 42 49 70 93 44 499 

For School Committee for 3 years: 
Geo. C. Thomas, elected 111 141 130 146 182 166 133 169 1178 

Eleanor Ingelfinger, elected 64 103 110 100 142 168 179 180 1046 

^fabel W. Simpson 30 67 55 77 53 66 86 53 487 

Andrew B. Holmes 107 65 40 24 16 41 33 32 358 

Albert M. Abbott 62 59 80 51 37 35 60 61 445 

Blanks 196 101 115 100 76 146 157 111 1002 

For School Committee for 1 year (to fill vacancy) : 
Arthur M. Wyman, elected 171 197 189 194 198 206 221 257 1633 

Blanks 114 71 76 55 55 105 103 46 625 

For Board of Public Welfare, 3 years: 
Harry E. Cahoon, elected 179 199 204 196 203 224 220 233 1658 

blanks 106 69 61 53 50 87 104 70 600 

Board of Health, 3 years: 
Loring Grimes, elected 189 203 202 210 212 238 233 250 1737 

blanks 96 65 63 39 41 73 91 53 521 



22 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



74 



186 194 
99 74 



196 198 

69 51 

199 202 
66 47 

92 118 



125 
48 



93 
38 



Water and Sewerage Board, 3 years: 
Harold G. Enholm, elected 176 194 
Blanks 109 

Park Commissioner for 3 years: 
Stewart P. Ellis, elected 
Blanks 

Trustee Public Library, 3 years: 
Jean G. Allan, elected 113 117 

Donald Redfern 82 91 

Blanks 90 60 

Trustee Public Library, 1 year (to fill vacancy) : 
Gustavus J. Esselen, Jr., elected 170 179 188 188 
Blanks 115 89 77 61 

For Tree Warden: 
Everett P. Mudge, elected 202 209 206 206 

Blanks 83 59 59 43 

For Constables, 1 year: 
Willis E. Shephard, elected 160 187 194 192 

Frank H. Bradford, elected 169 190 192 188 
George J. Place, elected 157 180 186 188 

Blanks 369 247 223 179 

Commissioner of Trust Funds, 1 year: 
Scattering 2 

Blanks 285 268 265 247 

Commissioner of Trust Funds, 2 years: 
Scattering 11 

Henrv S. Baldwin, elected 1 

Blanks 285 268 264 247 

Commissioner of Trust Funds, 3 vears: 
Tames W. Libbv, elected 155 193 187 162 

Blanks ' 130 75 78 87 



211 229 

42 82 

199 230 
54 81 

120 104 
81 154 

43 53 

199 212 
54 99 

211 239 
42 72 

201 220 
198 217 
189 205 
171 291 

5 1 
248 310 

7 1 

246 310 

178 211 
75 100 



219 236 1659 

105 67 599 

210 241 1661 
114 62 597 

147 123 943 
99 121 €46 
78 59 469 

213 239 1588 
111 64 670 

231 251 1755 
93 52 503 

235 237 1626 
207 234 1595 
202 228 1535 
328 210 2018 

1 1 10 
323 302 2248 

2 12 
1 2 

322 302 2244 

201 214 1501 
123 89 757 



Town Meeting Members, Precinct 1 

Ernest Corrado, elected 
C. Sanford Doughty, elected 
James W. Buchanan, elected 
Franklin H. Keating, elected 
LeRoy V. Perr}-, elected 
Leo Vaughan, elected 
Andrew B. Holmes 
Scattering 
Blanks 

Town Meeting Members, Precinct 2 

Harry W. Stanley, elected 
Henry A. Andersen, elected 
Joseph B. Abbott, elected 
C. Walter Burrill, elected 
James F. Etter, elected 
Elmer Forest, elected 
Earl Abrams 
Blanks 

Town Meeting Members, Precinct 3 
Chester P. Brown, elected 
Stuart P. Ellis, elected 
Albert M. Abbott, elected 
Willis B. Cressy, elected 
William E. Henry, elected 
Leland S. Ross, elected 
Clarence M. Finch 
Harry M. Shanahan 
Blanks 



174 


for 


3 


years 


154 


for 


3 


years 


148 


for 


3 


years 


143 


for 


3 


years 


137 


for 


3 


years 


21 


for 


3 


years 


11 








10 








916 









156 


for 


3 


years 


155 


for 


3 


years 


143 


for 


3 


years 


138 


for 


3 


years 


134 


for 


3 


years 


121 


for 


3 


years 


118 






643 









175 


for 


3 


years 


171 


for 


3 


years 


137 


for 


3 


years 


130 


for 


3 


years 


124 


for 


3 


years 


121 


for 


3 


years 


111 








74 








547 









1929] 



RECORDS OF TOWN CLERK 



23 



Town Meeting Members, Precinct 3 

(to fill vacancy) 

B. Malcolm Martin, elected 
Blanks 

Town Meeting Members, Precinct 4 
William P. Mower, elected 
Robert C. Mansfield, elected 
Leon W. Howard, elected 
Edward A. Sawyer, elected 
Orin L. Smith, elected 
George J. Harvey, elected 
Beatrice Wadleigh 
Blanks 

Town Meeting Members, Precinct 4 

(to fill vacancy) 

Mervin J. Davis, elected 
Blanks 



1 OO 

188 


for 2 


years 


77 






180 


for 3 


years 


187 


for 3 


years 


178 


for 3 


years 


169 


for 3 


years 


160 


for 3 


years 


1 /CO 

lo^ 


tor 6 


years 


99 






359 






196 


for 1 


year 


63 







Town Meeting Members, Precinct 5 

George C. Thomas, elected 196 for 3 years 

George B. Learned, elected 192 for 3 years 

Florence E. Preston, elected 191 for 3 years 

Alfred B. Brackett, elected 190 for 3 years 

Forrest M. Adams, elected 189 for 3 years 

Charles S. Goodridge, elected 176 for 3 years 

Blanks 384 



Town Meeting Members, Precinct 6 



Donald Redfern, elected 


213 


for 3 


years 


Frederick J. Rudd, elected 


211 


for 3 


years 


Eleanor Ingelfinger, elected 


201 


for 3 


years 


Frank S. Newton, elected 
Warren H. Colby, elected 


197 


for 3 


years 


196 


for 3 


years 


Loran J. Harvey, elected 


157 


for 3 


years 


Maurice Yozell 


150 






Blanks 


541 







Town Meeting Members, Precinct 7 



Roger W. Pope, elected 


172 


for 3 


years 


Frank E. Morrison, elected 


168 


for 3 


years 


Conrad P. Richardson, elected 


155 


for 3 


years 


John Homan, elected 


146 


for 3 


years 


James C. Soutter, elected 


136 


for 3 


years 


Eben G. Pedrick, elected 


132 


for 3 


years 


Annie H. Bourke 


127 






Ernest M. Folger 


123 






Raymond E, Nichols 


115 






Blanks 


670 







Town Meeting Members, Precinct 7 

(to fill vacancy) 

G. Lloyd Smith, elected 196 for 2 vears 

Blanks 128 

Town Meeting Members, Precinct 8 

Alonzo F. Titus, elected 220 for 3 years 

John R. Hurlburt, elected 196 for 3 years 

Edward LaCroix, elected 219 for 3 years 

Herbert A. Johnson, elected 180 for 3 years 

Frederick A. Hale, elected 174 for 3 vears 



24 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



Gustavus J. Esselen, Jr., elected 153 for 3 years 

Robert C. McKay 146 

Wilmot R. Hastings 144 

Blanks 386 

Adjourned to Mondav, February 25, 1929, at 7:30 P. M., at the 
Town Hall. 

Attest: 

RALPH D. MERRITT, 

; . Town Clerk. 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 

February 20, 1929. 
John R. Hurlburt, Moderator, appointed Donald Redfern, 292 
Humphre}' street. Precinct 6, a member of the Finance Committee 
for 3 years. 

Attest: 

RALPH D. MERRITT, 

Town Clerk. 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
February 25, 1929 

In accordance with the adjournment of Februar}- 18, 1929, the 
voters were called to order by John R. Hurlburt, ^Moderator, at 7:30 
P. M., the necessary- quorum being present. 

Voted, to dispense with the reading of records of last meeting. 

\'oted. Article 2 be taken up with Articles 6 and 7. 

Voted, Article 3. That the bond of the Town Clerk and of the 
Custodian of Trust Funds be fixed in the penal sum of one thousand 
dollars and ten thousand dollars respectivel}'. 

Article 4 referred to the Finance Committee. 

The Finance report was read by James W. Santry, Chairman. 

Report of the Finance Committee 

To the Members of the Limited Town Meeting: 

The Finance Committee has been considering the articles in the 
warrant for the annual town meeting and has decided that it would be 
helpful to make a report covering the work that it has done. 

The other parts of the warrant are now under consideration and 
reports under them will be made at an adjourned meeting. 

Article 3. We recommend that the bond of the Town Clerk and 
of the Custodian of Trust Funds be fixed in the penal sum of one 
thousand dollars and ten thousand dollars respectiveh". 

Article 5. We recommend, for the purposes specified in this article, 
that the Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, be and hereby 
is authorized to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the 
revenue of the financial year beginning January 1, 1929, to an amount 
not to exceed in the aggregate five hundred thousand dollars and to 
issue a note or notes of the town therefor, pa3^able within one \'ear, 
the debt or debts incurred thereby to be paid from the revenue of said 
financial year. 

Article 7. We recommend that so much of Article 7 that relates 
to the recommendation of the Chief of Police concerning a new police 
station, which appears on page 168 of the annual report, be considered 
with Article 45. 

We recommend that so much of Article 7 that relates to the 
recommendation of the Chief of Police concerning the appropriation of 
$650 for the purchase of uniforms for the captains and patrolmen of 
our Police Department be considered with Article 53. 



1929] RECORDS OF TOWN CLERK 25 

Article 30. This article relates to the Eastern Intercepting Sewer. 
Last year the town appropriated $13,000 for work upon this sewer. 
This appropriation carried the sewer across Ocean avenue and into 
Shepard avenue. It is the purpose now to complete this sewer. 

The Finance Committee conferred with the Water and Sewerage 
Board and many residents of the part of the town affected. It appeared 
at this conference that one of the owners of property in this vicinity 
has six cesspools on his land; that all of them have more than two, 
and that the annual cost of cleaning these cesspools is substantial. 

An examination of the records shows that during the past seven 
years only $81,000 has been expended on sewers for the entire town. 
This represents an expenditure of about $11,000 each year, although 
during the above mentioned period new buildings to the value of several 
million dollars have been added to the valuation of the town. This 
' shows that the construction of sewers has not kept pace with the needs 
of the town. The Water and Sewerage Board and the Board of Health 
strongly recommend the completion of this intercepting sewer. 

We recommend, therefore, that work on the Eastern Intercepting 
Sewer be resumed from its present terminus ^to Salem street and Beach 
BluflF avenue, a distance of approximately 5547 feet, and that the sum 
of fifty-four thousand dollars be appropriated therefor to be raised by 
bonds or notes of the town. 

Article 31. Before the eastern section of the town can receive any 
benefit from the intercepting sewer, lateral sewers must be built. This 
article relates to the building of one of these laterals. There is pressing 
need for the construction of this sewer, and it is recommended by the 
Water and Sewerage Board and by the Board of Health. We recom- 
mend, therefore, that a sewer be built in Phillips avenue from Estabrook 
road to Stanwood road, a distance, of about 1150 feet, and that the sum 
of fifty-one hundred dollars be appropriated therefor to be raised by 
bonds or notes of the town. 

Article 32. This article relates to the building of another lateral 
sewer in connection with the intercepting sewer. It is greatly needed 
in the district which it will serve. It is recommended by the Water 
and Sewerage Board and by the Board of Health. We recommend that 
a sewer be built in Bradlee avenue and Atlantic avenue south-westerly 
from Ocean avenue, a distance of about 2000 feet, and that the sum of 
twelve thousand dollars be appropriated therefor to be raised by bonds 
or notes of the town. 

Article ^3. This article concerns the construction of another lateral 
sewer. It will also serve a district that is greatly in need of sewer 
facilities. It is recommended by the Water and Sewerage Board and 
by the Board of Health. We recommend that a sewer be built in 
Humphrej- street and Ocean avenue, a distance of about 330 feet, and 
that the sum of fourteen hundred dollars be appropriated therefor to 
be raised by bonds or notes of the town. 

Article 34. This article relates to the construction of a sewer in 
Bristol avenue. This sewer is in another part of the town and is in no 
way connected with the intercepting sewer to which we have referred 
in the above mentioned articles. It is recommended b}' the Water and 
Sewerage Board and by the Board of Health. We believe that there 
is pressing need for this sewer and we therefore recommend that a 
sewer be built in Bristol avenue for a distance of 385 feet from Stetson 
avenue, and that the sum of fort^'-three hundred dollars be appropriated 
therefor to be raised by bonds or notes of the town. 

Article 35. This article relates to a sewer in Sargent road and 
Prospect avenue. The owners of property in these streets are having 
difficulty with overrunning cesspools. It is a condition that should not 
be permitted to exist. The construction of these sewers is recommended 
by the Water and Sewerage Board and by the Board of Health. We 
recommend that a sewer be built in Sargent road and Prospect avenue, 



26 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



a distance of approximately 430 feet from Aspen road, and that the 
sum of forty-five hundred dollars be appropriated therefor to be raised 
by bonds or notes of the town. 

Article 36. This article concerns the building of a sewer in Barn- 
stable street. The owners of property along this street are also having 
difficulty with overflowing cesspools. This sewer is also recommended 
by the Water and Sewerage Board and by the Board of Health. We 
recommend that a sewer be built in Barnstable street for a distance of 
approximately 230 feet from Stetson avenue, and that the sum of nine- 
teen hundred dollars be appropriated therefor to be raised by bonds 
or notes of the town. 

Article 45. This article concerns the erection of a building for the 
detention of persons arrested in Swampscott for the commission of 
crime. This article was inserted in consequence of a conference between 
the Mayor of the City of Lynn and the Board of Selectmen that was 
held some time during the past year. 

For many years persons arrested in Swampscott have been brought 
to the police station in Lynn where they have been detained, at the 
expense of the city of Lynn, pending their appearance in court. 

Section 34 of chapter 40 of the General Laws requires a town con- 
taining more than 3,000 inhabitants to maintain a suitable and con- 
venient lockup. A careful reading of this section, however, shows that 
it does not require that the lockup be maintained within the territorial 
limits of the town. Acting under this provision, the Mayor of the city 
of Lynn stated to the Board of Selectmen at the above mentioned con- 
ference, that provision should be made at the annual town meeting for 
the erection of a lockup so that persons arrested in Swampscott would- 
be detained there without placing any burden upon the city of Lynn. 

The Finance Committee found that the erection of a suitable build- 
ing for this purpose would mean the expenditure of a substantial sum 
of money, and would occasion other expenses. On January 29th we 
wrote to the Mayor setting forth all of the facts and suggesting to him 
that the practice of detaining persons arrested in Swampscott in the 
police station in Lynn be continued, and that for this service the town 
of Swampscott pay the city of Lynn a reasonable annual sum. On 
January 31st the Mayor replied that Swampscott might continue to use 
the Lynn police station as it had heretofore done, with the understand- 
ing that it should pay the annual sum of $100 to the city of Lynn for 
this service. 

The erection of a building for this purpose would cost several 
thousand dollars. We feel that it would cause other expense to the 
town. We believe that the amount stipulated by the Mayor of the city 
of Lynn for this service is reasonable. We, therefore, recommend that 
the present practice of using the Lynn police station for the purpose 
of detaining persons arrested in Swampscott be continued, and that the 
sum of one hundred dollars be paid annually therefor to the city of 
Lynn, to be taken from the Excess and Deficiency Fund. 

We recommend that further action under this article be indefinitely 
postponed. 

With reference to the recommendation of the Chief of Police con- 
cerning the needs of a new police station. We have investigated the 
condition of the police station. We believe that this building is large 
enough to satisfy the needs of the police department for many years, 
and we see no occasion for the erection of a new building, or making 
any addition to the present structure. The construction of a new build- 
ing would undoubtedly require an additional annual expense for main- 
tenance. In our opinion, care should be exercised before the fixed 
expenses of this department are in any way increased. We therefore 
recommend that consideration of this recommendation of the Chief of 
Police be indefinitely postponed. 

Article 53. This article and the above mentioned recommendation 
of the Chief of Police under Article 7 relate respectively to an annual 



1929] 



RECORDS OF TOWN CLERK 



27 



increase of $200 in the salary of the captains in the police department^ 
and to the appropriation of $650 for the purchase of uniforms for cap- 
tains and patrolmen. 

In considering this article, we must bear in mind that the budget of 
the police department is still large. This year it amounts to more than 
$35,000. It is a great deal larger than the amount of money expended 
by police departments in communities having substantially a population 
similar to that of Swampscott. In addition to that, the members of 
our department have the benefit of a pension to which they in no way 
contribute. Our patrolmen receive the same salary as patrolmen of 
the city of Boston and those under the Metropolitan Park Commission. 

A very interesting article appeared in the "New York Times" in. 
its Sunday issue of January 27, 1929, concerning the police department 
of that city. In connection with this article the following statement 
appears concerning the salary paid patrolmen of that city: 

"The New York policeman receives $1,769 a year for the first three 
years he is on the force. Out of that, in his first year, he must pay 
more than $250 for equipment, and he has many other expenses. Then 
after three years he receives salary raises — and at the end of the fifth 
year he is receiving $2,500 — his total maximum salary as a patrol- 
man. * * * 

"In buying uniforms for summer and winter, overcoat, raincoat, 
gun, holster, night-stick, and day-stick, he spends more than $250. * * * 

"A policeman, in addition to all his other expenses pays 2 per cent, 
of his salary into the pension fund every year and has to wait twenty- 
five years before he can retire on half pay." 

We believe that the patrolmen of New York City are underpaid. 
We are merely calling their condition to your attention in order to show 
that the patrolmen and the captains in our police department are far 
better off in this respect than are the patrolmen of New York City, 
although the work of police officers there must be more hazardous and 
more exacting than the work of any of our officers. We believe that 
the town should do nothing to add to the fixed expenses of this 
department. 

We therefore recommend that action under this article, and on 
the recommendation of the Chief of Police herein referred to, be in- 
definitely postponed. 

Article 56. We recommend that the town appropriate the sum 
of one thousand dollars for the observance of the Fourth of July and 
that this sum be taken from the Excess and Deficiency Fund. 

JAMES W. SANTRY, Chairman, 
RALPH J. CURTIS, 
CHARLES F. HATHAWAY, 
CHESTER A. BROWN, 
RALPH H. CARY, 
PAUL W. BRICKETT, 
FREDERICK J. RUDD, 
JOHN A. WALDO, 

Finance Committee. 
Voted, Article 5. To accept the report of the Finance Committee 
and adopt their recommendations as follows: 

That the Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, be and 
hereby is authorized to borrow money from time to time in anticipation 
of the revenue of the financial year beginning January 1, 1929, to an 
amount not to exceed in the aggregate five hundred thousand dollars and 
to issue a note or notes of the town therefor, payable within one year, 
the debt or debts incurred thereby to be paid from the revenue of said 
financial year. (Unanimous.) 

Voted, Article 6. To accept the report of the Board of Appeals. 
Voted that all of the report of the Board of Selectmen that does 
not ask for an appropriation of money be accepted, and that the Mod- 
erator appoint a committee of five citizens to make a recodification of 
the By-Laws, and that said committee after appointment grant public 
hearing on said By-Laws. 



28 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



Voted, that the report of the Planning Committee, and report of 
the Purchasing Committee that do not ask for appropriations be 
accepted. 

Voted, Article 7. To accept the report of the Finance Committee 
and adopt their recommendations as follows: 

That so much of Article 7 as relates to the recommendation of the 
Chief of Police concerning a new police station, be considered with 
Article 45. 

That so much of Article 7 as relates to the recommendation of the 
Chief of Police concerning the appropriation of $650 for the purchase of 
uniforms for the captains and patrolmen of our Police Department be 
considered with Article 53. 

Voted that balance of Article 7 and Articles 8 to 29 inclusive be 
referred to Finance Committee. 

Voted, Article 30. To accept the report of the Finance Committee 
and adopt their recommendations as follows: 

That w^ork on the Eastern Intercepting Sewer be resumed from its 
present terminus to Salem street and Beach BlufiF avenue, a distance of 
approximately 5547 feet, and that the sum of fifty-four thousand dollars 
be appropriated therefor to be raised by bonds or notes of the town. 
(Unanimous.) 

Voted, Article 31. To accept the report of the Finance Committee 
and adopt their recommendations as followe: 

That a sewer be built in Phillips avenue from Estabrook road to 
Stanwood road a distance of about 1150 feet, and that the sum of fifty- 
one hundred dollars be appropriated therefor to be raised by bonds or 
notes of the town. (Unanimous.) 

Voted, Article 32. To accept the report of the Finance Committee 
and adopt their recommendations as follows: 

That a sewer be built in Bradlee avenue and Atlantic avenue south- 
westerly from Ocean avenue, a distance of about 2000 feet and that the 
sum of twelve thousand dollars be appropriated therefor to be raised 
by bonds or notes of the town. (Unanimous.) 

Voted, Articles 33 to 36 inclusive be taken up together. 

Voted that the several reports of the Finance Committee be ac- 
cepted, and their several recommendations be adopted as follows: 

That a sewer be built in Humphrey street and Ocean avenue, a 
distance of about 330 feet and that the sum of fourteen hundred dollars 
be appropriated therefor to be raised by bonds or notes of the town. 

That a sewer be built in Bristol avenue for a distance of 385 feet 
from Stetson avenue and that the sum of forty-three hundred dollars be 
appropriated therefor to be raised by bonds or notes of the town. 

That a sewer be built in Sargent road and Prospect avenue, a dis- 
tance of approximately 430 feet from Aspen road and that the sum of 
forty-five hundred dollars be appropriated therefor to be raised by 
bonds or notes of the town. 

That a sewer be built in Barnstable street for a distance of approxi- 
mately 230 feet from Stetson avenue and that the sum of nineteen hun- 
dred dollars be appropriated therefor to be raised by bonds or notes of 
the town. (Unanimous.) 

Voted, that the Water and Sewerage Board be authorized to look 
into the apportionment of the costs of sewers to the town, and see of 
the part paid out by the town, what part the town gets back and report 
at the next adjourned town meeting. 

Voted, Articles 37 to 44 inclusive be referred to the Finance Com- 
mittee. 

Voted, Article 45. To accept the report of the Finance Committee 
and adopt their recommendations as follows: 

That the present practice of using the Lynn police station for the 
purpose of detaining persons arrested in Swampscott be continued, and 
that the sum of one hundred dollars be paid annually therefor to the 
city of Lynn, to be taken from the Excess and Deficiency Fund. 



1929] 



RECORDS OF TOWN CLERK 



29 



That further action under this article be indefinitely postponed. 

Voted, Article 46. That the Town Clerk give a proper legal notice 
to all persons interested in the proposed amendment to the Zoning 
By-Laws, that a public hearing will be held at the adjourned town meet- 
ing on March 25, 1929. 

Voted, Article 47. That the Town Clerk give a proper legal notice 
to all persons interested in the proposed amendment to the Zoning 
By-Laws, that a public hearing will be held at the adjourned town 
meeting on Alarch 25, 1929. 

Voted, y\rticle 48. That a committee of eight consisting of one 
town meeting member from each precinct be appointed by the moderator 
to make an investigation of the subject matter referred to in the article 
and report at the adjourned town meeting. 

Voted, Article 49. That a committee of one from each precinct be 
appointed by the moderator to investigate the needs of a new Town 
Hall and report at the next adjourned town meeting. 

Voted, Articles 50 to 52 inclusive referred to Finance Committee. 

Voted, Article 53. To accept the report of the Finance Committee 
and adopt their recommendations. 

Action under this article and on the recommendation of the Chief 
herein referred to, be indefinitely postponed. 

Voted, Articles 54 and 55 be referred to the Finance Committee. 

Voted, Article 56. To accept the report of the Finance Committee 
and their recommendations as amended. That the town appropriate 
the sum of one thousand dollars for the observance of the Fourth of 
July and that this sum be taken from the Excess and Deficiency Fund; 
that the Moderator appoint a committee, one member from each pre- 
cinct as a Fourth of July Committee. 

Voted, Articles 57 to 62 inclusive be referred to the Finance Com- 
mittee. 

Voted, that when we adjourn, it be to Monday evening, March 25^ 
1929, at 7:30 o'clock. 

Voted to adjourn at 8:45 P. M. 
Attest: 

RALPH D. MERRITT, 

Town Clerk. 



ASSISTANT TOWN CLERK 

February 26, 1929. 
Nina C. Merritt appointed assistant Town Clerk and qualified for 
the office. 

Attest: 

RALPH D. MERRITT, 
Town Clerk. 



COMMITTEES APPOINTED 

February 27, 1929. 
John R. Hurlburt, Moderator, appointed the following committee 
under Article AS, to investigate the matter of taking land for Park 
purposes: 

Robert B. Hegarty 
James D. Bentley 
James A. Cook 
George J. Harvey 
Henry S. Baldwin 
Clarence B. Humphrey 
Joseph Atwood 
Edward LaCroix 



Precinct 1 

Precinct 2 

Precinct 

Precinct 

Precinct 

Precinct 

Precinct 



Precinct 8 

Under Article 49 to investigate the needs of a new Town Hall: 



^30 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



Precinct 1 
Precinct 2 
Precinct 
Precinct 
Precinct 
Precinct 
Precinct 
Precinct 8 
Attest 



G. Edwin Allen 
Fred A. McKennon 
Stuart P. Ellis 
Robert C. Mansfield 
George B. Learned 
Howard K. Glidden 
Roger W. Pope 
Louis M. Atherton 



RALPH D. 



MERRITT, 
Town Clerk. 



TOWN HALL COMMITTEE 

March 2, 1929. 

John R. Hurlburt, Moderator, appointed Gustavus J. Esselen, Jr., 
■a member of the Town Hall Committee in place of Louis M. Atherton, 
who resigned from said committee. 
Attest: - 

RALPH D. MERRITT, 

Town Clerk. 



SELECTED TO FILL VACANCIES 

March 22, 1929. 

At a special meeting of the Town Meeting Members of Precinct 
8 held on the above date, Robert McKay, Eulow street, w^as elected 
to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Clarence H. Hollow^ay. 

JOHN R. HURLBURT, Chairman, 
ARTHUR M. WYMAN, Clerk. 

Attest: 

RALPH D. MERRITT, 

Town Clerk. 
March 22, 1929. 

At a special meeting of the Town Meeting Members of Precinct 5 
"held on the above date Philip H. Stafford, Banks road, was elected to 
:fill the vacancy caused by the death of Edward Tillotson. 

HENRY S. BALDWIN, Chairman, 
CHARLES S. GOODRIDGE, Clerk. 

Attest: 

RALPH D. MERRITT, 
Town Clerk. 



WARRANT FOR SPECIAL MEETING 
Monday, March 25, 1929 

Essex, ss. 

To either of the Constables of the town of Swampscott in said County, 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts you are 
-directed to notify the inhabitants of the town of Swampscott, qualified 
to vote in elections and in town affairs, to assemble in the Town Hall 
in said Swampscott, on Monday, the twenty-fifth day of March, at 7:15 
P. M., then and there to act on the following articles, viz: 

Article 1. To see if the town \v\\\ vote to rescind the vote taken 
on Article 2 of the Special Town Meeting held January 16, 1929, 
whereby it was voted to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take in 
fee for the purpose of a public way, the land described in Article 1 
of the warrant for that meeting and to appropriate the sum of ^300 
therefor to be taken from the tax levy of the current year. 



V 



1929] 



RECORDS OF TOWN CLERK 



31 



Article 2. To see if the town will accept as a public way the 
following described way as located and laid out by the Board of 
Selectmen and appropriate money therefor. 

Beginning at a point situated on the southerly line of Orchard 
road, said point being the point of reverse curve; thence curving to the 
left with a radius of 154.70 feet, for a distance of 100.86 feet; thence 
running S 76-39-20 W for a distance of 30.00 feet; thence curving to 
the left with a radius of 200.00 feet, for a distance of 44.05 feet to the 
land formerly of Alaria S. Hastings recently taken by eminent domain 
by the town of Swampscott; thence N 62-43-50 W by said land formerly 
of Maria S. Hastings for a distance of 59.26 feet; thence curving to the 
right with a radius of 250.00 feet for a distance of 90.65 feet; thence 
N 76-39-20 E for a distance of 30.00 feet; thence curving to the left 
with a radius of 24.00 feet, for a distance of 42.81 feet, to the southerly 
line of Orchard road; thence easterly along said southerly line, for a 
distance of 134.05 feet to the point of beginning. 

Article 3. To see if the town will authorize the Board of Select- 
men to take by eminent domain, for the purpose of a public way, the 
property described in Article 2 or an easement in and over the same, 
and appropriate money therefor. 

Article 4. To see if the town will appropriate money for the pur- 
pose of constructing a street over the way as laid out and described 
in the foregoing articles. 

Article 5. To see if the town will vote to lay water pipes_ in the 
way laid out by the Selectmen and described in Article 2 of this war- 
rant, and appropriate money therefor. 

Article 6. To see if the town will vote to lay sewer pipes^ in the 
way laid out by the Selectmen and described in Article 2, of this war- 
rant, and appropriate money therefor. 

Article 7. To appropriate and raise by borrowing or otherwise, 
under an}' general or special law which authorizes the town to raise 
money by borrowing or otherwise, such sum or ?ums of money as may 
be necessary- for any or all of the purposes mentioned in the foregoing 
articles. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an attested 
copy thereof at the Town Hall, the post offices, at least one public 
and conspicuous place in each precinct in the town, and at or in the 
immediate vicinity of each railroad station in the town, seven days 
before the day appointed for said meeting. 

Hereof fail not, and make due return of this warrant, with your 
doings thereon, to the Town Clerk at the time and place of meeting 
aforesaid. 

Given under our hands this fifteenth dav of March, A, D. 1929. 

HOWARD K. GLIDDEN, 
R. WYER GREENE, 
DANIEL F. KNOWLTON, 

Selectmen of Swampscott. 

A true copy. Attest: 

J'RANK H. BRADFORD, 

Constable. 



RETURN ON THE WARRANT 

Pursuant to the within warrant to me directed, I have notified the 
legal voters of Swampscott, by posting attested copies of said warrant 
at the Town Hall, Post Offices, at least one public and conspicuous 
place in each precinct in the town, and at or in the immediate vicinity 
of each railroad station in Swampscott on Monday March 18. 1929, the 
posting of said notices being seven davs before the time of said meeting. 

FRANK H. BRADFORD, 

Constable. 



32 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
Monday, March 25, 1929 

In accordance with the foregoing warrant the voters assembled 
at the Town Hall, and were called to order by John R. Hurlburt, 
Moderator, at 7:30 P. M. the necessary quorum being present. The 
warrant with the return thereon was read by the Towm Clerk. 

The Finance Report was read by James W. Santry, Chairman. 

Fmance Report. 

Article 1. Wc recommend that the vote passed under Article 2 
of the w^arrant for the Special Town Meeting held January 16, 1929, 
be rescinded. 

Article 2. The purpose of this article is to provide a suitable 
approach to the Stanley School. We recommend that the w^ay des- 
cribed in this article, and as laid out by the Board of Selectmen, be 
accepted as a public wa}'. 

Article 3. We recommend that the Board of Selectmen be author- 
ized to take an easement for the purposes of a public way, in the 
premises described in Article 2 of this warrant, and that three hundred 
dollars be appropriated therefor from the Excess and Deficiency Fund. 

Article 4. We recommend that the Board of Selectmen be author- 
ized to make a contract in behalf of the town for the construction of 
the way described in Articles 2 and 3 of this warrant, and that for this 
purpose the sum of twentj^-three hundred dollars be appropriated from 
the Excess and Deficiency Fund. 

Article 5. We recommend that the Water and Sewerage Board be 
authorized to la}' water pipes in the way described in Article 2 and 3 
of this warrant, and that the sum of sixteen hundred and fifty dollars 
be appropriated therefor from the revenue of the Water Department 
for the current year. 

Article 6. We recommend that the Water and Sewerage Board 
be authorized to build a sewer in the way described in Article 2 and 3 
of this warrant, and that the sum of two thousand dollars be appro- 
priated therefor by transfer from the unexpended balance of the Frank- 
lin avenue account. 

Article 7. We recommend that action under this article be indef- 
initelv postponed. 

TAMES W. SANTRY, 
RALPH T. CURTIS, 
CHESTER A. BROWN, 
RALPH H. CARY, 
PAUL W. BRICKETT, 
DONALD REDFERN, 

Finance Committee. 
Voted, Article 1. To accept the report of the Finance Committee 
and adopt their recommendations as follows: 

That the vote passed under Article 2 of the warrant for the Special 
Tov.n Meeting held January 16, 1929, be rescinded. 

Voted, Article 2. To accept the report of the Finance Committee 
and adopt their recommendations. That the way described in this 
article, and as laid out by the Board of Selectmen, be accepted as a 
public way. 

Voted, Article 3. To accept the report of the Finance Committee, 
and adopt their recommendations: That the Board of Selectmen be 
authorized to take an easement for the purpose of a public way in the 
premises described in Article 2 of this warrant, and that three hundred 
dollars be appropriated therefor from the Excess and Deficiency Fund. 
(Unanimous.) 



1929] 



RECORDS OF TOWN CLERK 



33 



Voted, Article 4. To accept the report of the Finance Committee 
and adopt their recommendations as follows: That the Board of Select- 
men be authorized to make a contract in behalf of the town for the 
construction of the way described in Articles 2 and 3 of this warrant 
and that for this purpose the sum of twenty-three hundred dollars 
be appropriated from the Excess and Deficiency Fund. 

Voted, Article 5. To accept the report of the Finance Committee 
and adopt their recommendations as follows: That the Water and Se\y- 
erage Board be authorized to lay water pipes in the way described in 
Articles 2 and 3 of this warrant and that the sum of sixteen hundred 
and fifty dollars be appropriated therefor from the revenue of the 
Water Department for the current year. 

Voted, Article 6. To accept the report of the Finance Committee 
and adopt their recommendations as follows: That the W'ater and 
Sewerage Board be authorized to build a sewer in the way described 
in Articles 2 and 3 of this warrant, and that the sum of two thousand 
dollars be appropriated therefor by transfer from the unexpended bal- 
ance of the Franklin avenue account. 

Voted, Article 7. To accept the report of the Finance Committee 
and adopt their recommendations: That action under this article be 
indefinitely postponed. 

Voted' to dissolve at 7:40 P. M. 
Attest: 

RALPH D. MERRITT, 

Town Clerk. 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
Monday, March 25, 1929. 

In accordance with the adjournment of February 25, 1929, the 
voters were called to order by John R. Hurlburt, Moderator, the neces- 
sary quorum being present. 

Voted to dispense with the reading of the records of the last 
meeting. 

A motion that the public hearing be held before the articles in the 
warrant are taken up in order was lost. 

Finance Report was read by James W. Santry, Chairman. 

Report of Finance Committee 

To the Members of the Limited Town Meeting: 

This report embraces a consideration of all articles in the warrant 
calling for the appropriation of money, and also all recommendations 
of officers and committees of the same nature. 

In the future we suggest that all recommendations in the reports 
of officers or committees requiring appropriations appear in the form 
of an article in the warrant. At present the Finance Committee not 
only has to consider all articles in the warrant carrying appropriations, 
but also recommendations of a like nature. This requires careful scrutiny 
of the reports of all officers and committees to ascertain the presence 
of such recommendations. 

We suggest also that departments refrain from including in their 
recommendations money for their fixed expenses. These properly 
should appear in their budgets, for that is the only way in which the 
voters can learn the amount of money that each department is spending. 

Article 4. We recommend that the salaries of all town officers for 
the ensuing year be the same as those of last year. 

Article 7. The recommendations of the Water and Sewerage Board, 
on pages 132, 134 and 135 of the town report, are covered by articles in 
the warrant and our recommendations appear under each of those 
articles. 



34 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



The recommendations of the Board of Health, on page 136 of the 
town report, have been covered by recommendations under articles in 
the warrant. 

The Health Officer, on pages 137 and 138 of the town report, 
recommends the construction of sewers in twenty-one streets. At tlie 
meeting held February 25th the town adopted recommendations for 
sewers in some of these streets and more than $80,000 was appropriated 
for these purposes. While undoubtedly there is need for sewers in the 
other streets enumerated in the Health Officer's report, we feel that 
provision should be made for them at a later time, except the sewer in 
Walker road. We are informed that the houses that are now in the 
process of erection on this part of Walker road cannot be drained into 
cesspools because of the nature of the land. We recommend that a 
sewer be built in Walker road from the present terminus of the sewer 
in this road, in a northerly direction, for a distance of about 125 feet and 
that the sum of $1,208.03 be appropriated therefor by transfer from the 
unexpended balance of the Walker road sewer. 

We have considered the recommendation of the Health Officer 
concerning the stable for the Highway Department in another part of 
our report. 

All other recommendations made by the Board of Health or any 
officer thereof requiring the appropriation of money have been con- 
sidered in other parts of our report. 

The Trustees of the Public Library, on page 151 of the town 
report, recommend that the upper room of the building be finished so 
that it may be used as a children's room. They desire, however, to give 
further consideration to this subject. We recommend that this be done 
and that a report be made concerning it to the next annual town meeting. 

We recommend that action on all other recommendations of the 
Trustees be indefinitely postponed. 

The Superintendent of the Cemetery, on page 161 of the town 
report, states that there is an unusual demand for lots in the cemetery 
and recommends the expenditure of $3,000 for the preparation of land 
to meet this demand. We recommend the appropriation of three 
thousand dollars for this purpose from the receipts arising from the 
sale of lots in the cemetery. 

The Superintendent at a conference with our Committee stated 
that he is in need of a small truck. We recommend that he be author- 
ized to purchase a one-half ton truck for use in the Cemetery, and that 
the sum of five hundred dollars be appropriated therefor from the 
receipts from the sale of lots. 

We recommend that action on all other recommendations of the 
Superintendent be indefinitely postponed. 

The Chief of Police, on page 168 of the town report, recommends 
the installation of four traffic signal lights at the junction of New 
Ocean and Burrill streets. He estimates that the expense of this would 
be $500. After that there would be the cost of maintenance. These 
streets are generally used by the public and the expense of this item 
should not be borne entirely by Swampscott. We suggest that the 
Chief of Police confer with the Department of Public Works and the 
Board of Selectmen with the view of making some arrangement whereby 
a part of the expense of installing and maintaining these lights shall be 
borne by the Commonwealth. We recommend that further action under 
this recommendation be indefinitely postponed. 

We recommend that two J. D. L. 74 Twin Harley-Davidson 
motorcycles be purchased for the use of the Police Department to 
replace unserviceable equipment, and that the sum of five hundred and 
thirty dollars be appropriated therefor from the Excess and Deficiency 
Fund. 

We recommend the purchase of two Harley-Davidson side cars to 
be used on J. D. L. 74 Twin Harley-Davidson motorcycles by the 
Police Department, and that the sum of two hundred and thirty dollars 
be appropriated therefor from the Excess and Deficiency Fund. 



1929] 



RECORDS OF TOWN CLERK 



35 



We have already reported on all other recommendations requiring 
the appropriation of money that appear in the report of the Chief of 
Police. 

The Board of Engineers of the Fire Department, on page 175 of 
the town report, make the following recommendations, viz.: $1,000 for 
hydrant rental, $250 for installation of a fire alarm box at the Stanley 
School, and $500 for five hundred feet of 2 1-2 inch hose. We recom- 
mend that these recommendations be adopted and that the sum of 
seventeen hundred and fifty dollars be appropriated therefor from the 
Excess and Deficiency Fund. 

We recommend that action on all other recommendations of the 
Board of Fire Engineers be indefinitely postponed. 

The Surveyor of Highways, on page 179 of the town report, recom- 
mends the replanking of the Essex street bridge. We recommend that 
this work be done under the direction of the Surveyor of Highways in 
accordance with the provisions of the by-laws relating to the letting of 
contracts, and that the sum of six hundred dollars be appropriated 
therefor from the Excess and Deficiency Fund. 

The Surveyor of Highways also recommends that the abutment on 
the Danvers street bridge be pointed. It is estimated that this work will 
cost $800. We recommend that this work be done, under the direction 
of the Surveyor of Highways, in pursuance of the provisions of the 
by-laws relating to the awarding of contracts, and that the sum of eight 
hundred dollars be appropriated therefor from the Excess and De- 
ficiency Fund. 

Another part of our report deals with the recommendation of the 
Surveyor of Highways concerning a stable for the use of the Highway 
Department. 

The Board of Selectmen, on page 211 of the town report, recom- 
mends that notice be taken of the 300th anniversary of the Settlement 
of Lynn, of which Swampscott was then a part. At the conference 
with the Board concerning this subject it was stated that plans are 
under consideration involving the placing of markers at certain historical 
points in the town, and that for this purpose some money would be 
required. We believe that public attention should be directed to this 
interesting event. Chapter 16 of the Acts of 1929 permits the use of 
public money for the observance of this anniversary. We recommend 
the appropriation of two hundred dollars from the Excess and Deficiency 
Fund for this purpose to be expended under the direction of a com- 
mittee of three residents of the town to be appointed by the moderator. 

The Board of Selectmen also recommends, on page 214 of the 
town report, the extension of the white way lights along Essex street 
to the railroad bridge and along Humphrey street from Millett road 
to Phillips corner. The town is spending about $25,000 annually in 
lighting its streets. This is more than one dollar of our tax rate. We 
believe that no additional substantial expense should be incurred for 
this purpose at the present time. We therefore recommend that con- 
sideration of this matter be indefinitely postponed. 

We have considered all other recommendations of the Board of 
Selectmen in other parts of our report. 

The committee on the erection of a stable for the use of the 
Highway Department, on page 233 of the town report, recommends 
the appropriation of $20,000 for the construction of a building for this 
purpose. At the last annual town meeting our committee, after con- 
ferring with the Surveyor of Highways, recommended the appropriation 
of $10,000 for this building. This was found to be insufficient and the 
meeting passed a vote directing the committee on the stable to give 
further study to the subject. In the meantime, additional plans have 
been made by Mr. Charles V. Burgess, architect. We have gone over 
these plans with the committee and they appear to cover every feature 
that is desired by the. Surveyor of Highways. The estimates obtained 
by the committee indicate that this building can be erected for $17,500. 



36 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



The need of a stable is emphasized by the Surveyor of Highways and 
the Board of Health. Our inspection of the building indicates that a 
new structure should be provided. We therefore recommend that the 
sum of seventeen thousand five hundred dollars be appropriated to be 
raised by bonds or notes of the town, for the erection of a stable suitable 
for the needs of the Highway Department, in pursuance of plans and 
specifications made by Charles V. Burgess, architect, and in accordance 
with the by-laws relating to the awarding of contracts, and that the 
Stable Committee be authorized to make, sign and deliver in the name 
and behalf of the town a contract therefor. 

The needs of the High School have been carefully investigated by 
a committee appointed at the last annual town meeting. The report of 
this committee is printed in the town report on pages 225 to 227, in- 
clusive. We have conferred with this committee and have also exam- 
ined the building. We recommend that a committee be appointed to 
select a site suitable for a new high school building, to employ an 
architect, if this is deemed advisable by the committee, to prepare plans 
and estimates for such a building, and to report at a subsequent town 
meeting concerning said site, the estimated cost thereof, a sketch or 
outline of said building, and the estimated cost of erecting and equip- 
ping it; said committee shall consist of five persons to be appointed in 
the following manner, viz.: one member from the School Committee 
to be designated by the School Committee, and four citizens of the town 
to be appointed by the moderator. We further recommend that the 
sum of $801.90 be appropriated by transfer from the Redington street 
school account to be used by the committee for the above mentioned 
purposes. 

Article 8. To see what action the town will take in relation to the 
appropriation of money for departmental and other expenses as recom- 
mended and set forth on pages 216, 217 and 218 of the annual town 
report. 

We recommend that the sum of $1,083.20 be transferred from the 
account of Excess and Deficiency to the account of Awards and Exe- 
cutions for the purpose of paying such awards as may be approved by 
the Board of Selectmen. 

We recommend that the sum of $5,000.00 be transferred from the 
account of Excess and Deficiency to the account of Humphrey street 
repairs for the purpose of making necessary repairs to the cement 
pavement in the vicinity of Phillips park, this amount together with the 
sum of $4,500 appropriated in the Highway budget to be expended under 
the direction of the Surveyor of Highways and Board of Selectmen. 

We recommend that the sum of $2,133.45 be transferred from the 
Municipal Insurance Fund Income and the sum of $1,019.70 be trans- 
ferred from the Alunicipal Insurance Fund for the purpose of paying 
premiums coming due this year on insurance held by the town on town 
property. 

Under the provisions of Chapter 396 of the Acts of 1928 it is 
necessary that the town make an appropriation for the conduct of the 
Water Department as it does for all other departments. We therefore 
recommend that the sum of $61,955 be appropriated for the Water 
Department, the same to be taken from the Water revenue of the 
present year. 

We recommend that the following amounts be appropriated for 
the various departments for the ensuing year: 



General Government 



Accounting 
Treasury 

Collector of Taxes 
Assessors 



Legislative 
Selectmen 



$550.00 
3,775.00 
2,545.00 
2,303.00 
3,489.59 
4,200.00 



1929] 



RECORDS OF TOWN CLERK 



37 



Town Clerk $716.00 

Law 2,000.00 

Election and Registration 3,000.00 

Engineering 6,600.00 

Town Hall 4,000.00 

Town Hall Repairs 1,500.00 

Certification of Notes and Bonds 1,000.00 

Board of Appeals 250.00 

Protection of Life and Property 

Police $35,374.42 

Fire 39,840.00 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 555.00 

Moth 4,673.00 

Tree Warden ' 3,540.00 

Forest Warden 200.00 

Forest Warden Special 500.00 

Inspector of Buildings 1,250.00 

Subordinate Officials 630.00 

Health and Sanitation 

Health $9,670.00 

Dental Clinic 1,200.00 

Health Nurse 1,350.00 

Cleaning Beaches 1,256.00 

Refuse and Garbage 12,865.00 

Health Dumps 1,700.00 

.Sewer 9,000.00 

Particular Sewers 1,000.00 

Care of Brooks 500.00 

Highways 

Highway Administration $2,900.00 

Highway 42,800.00 

Seal Coating 4,000.00 

Street Construction 3,000.00 

Street Watering and Oiling 4,000.00 

Sidewalk and Curbing 4,000.00 

Snow and Ice 6,000.00 

Lighting Streets 23,729.00 

Continuous Sidewalks 5,000.00 

Repairs on Equipment 600.00 

Humphrey Street Resurfacing 4,500.00 

Charities and Soldiers' Benefits 

Public Welfare $9,500.00 

Soldiers' Relief 5,500.00 

State Aid 500.00 

Military Aid * 400.00 

Pensions 5,677.88 

Schools and Libraries 

School $164,446.50 

School Repairs 1,800.00 

Development of School Grounds 1,000.00 

Traveling Expenses Outside Commonwealth 116.00 

Library 7,500.00 

Recreation and Unclassified 

Parks . $8,500.00 

Memorial Day 500.00 

Firemen's Memorial Sunday - ' 200.00 

Heat and Light G. A. R. Hall 625.00 



38 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



Unpaid Bills 
Overlay 1926 



Trust Fund Custodian's Bond 
Reserve Fund 
Printing Town Reports 



Heat and Light V. F. W. Hall 



District Nurse 
Legion Lease 



$200.00 
300.00 
1,350.00 
40.00 
5,000.00 
1,270.10 
250.00 
96.58 



Enterprises 



Cemetery 



$4,680.00 



Interest and Maturing Debt 



Interest on Loans in Anticipation of Reveilue 

Interest on General Debt 

Interest on Sev^'er Loans 

Interest on Tuberculosis Hospital Bonds 

General Debt Maturing 

Sewer Loans Maturing 

Tuberculosis Hospital Bonds Maturing 



$10,000.00 
12,457.50 
6,518.75 
1,960.00 
35,606.25 
14,850.00 
4,000.00 



Agency 



Tuberculosis Hospital Maintenance 



$5,834.29 



Article 9. This article seeks the permanent surfacing of Franklin 
avenue from Stetson avenue to Paradise road. The building of a sewer 
in this street last year left it in bad condition. From our recent in- 
spection of this street we believe that a new surface of a permanent 
character should be built. We recommend that a surface of bituminous 
macadam be laid in Franklin avenue from Stetson avenue to Paradise 
road in accordance with specifications approved by the Department of 
Public Works of the Commonwealth, and that the Board of Selectmen 
be authorized to make, sign and deliver a contract in behalf of the town 
therefor, and that for this purpose the sum of thirteen thousand dollars 
be appropriated to be raised by bonds or notes of the town. 

Article 10. Before any permanent work is done on the streets 
mentioned in this article, we are advised by the Town Engineer that 
provision should be made for the draining of water that collects on 
Humphrey street in the vicinity of Forest avenue. We have considered 
this feature under Article 18. The streets, however, are in bad condition 
and some work should be done on them. We therefore recommend that 
the sum of fifteen hundred dollars be appropriated from the Excess and 
Deficiency Fund to be used in placing the streets named in this article 
in a safe condition for travel, the work to be done under the direction 
of the Surveyor of Highways. 

Article 11. We have conferred with the Surveyor of Highways 
and the Town Engineer concerning the work contemplated by this 
article. They recommend fhat more study be given to it. We therefore 
recommend that action under this article be indefinitely postponed. 

Article 12. The Surveyor of Highways, on page 217 of the town 
report, recommends the appropriation of $20,000 for new construction. 
In conferring with the Surveyor, he recommended the resurfacing of 
the eastern part of Alonument avenue from Burrill street to its junction 
with Walker road, and from this point, the resurfacing of Walker road 
to the_ bridge of the Boston & Maine Railroad. This street is in bad 
condition. We recommend that the Board of Selectmen make, sign and 
deliver a contract in behalf of the town for the resurfacing of said 
Monument avenue and Walker road with bituminous macadam con- 
struction, in accordance with specifications approved by the Depart- 
ment of Public Works of the Commonwealth, and that for this purpose 
the sum of twenty thousand dollars be appropriated to be raised by 
bonds or notes of the town. 



1929] 



RECORDS OF TOWN CLERK 



39 



Article 13. We are advised by the Town Counsel that the town 
meeting has nothing to do with the change of the lines of streets, but 
that this power can be exercised only by the Selectmen. We therefore 
recommend that action under this article be indefinitely postponed. 

Article 14. The ledge described in this article extends into Crescent 
street and makes the street dangerous for travel at this point. We 
recommend that tw^o hundred fifty dollars be appropriated from the 
Excess and Deficiency Fund to reduce this ledge, to be expended under 
the direction of the Surveyor of Highways. 

Article 15. This article contemplates the exercise of powers that are 
possessed only by the Board of Selectmen and we therefore recommend 
that action under this article be indefinitely postponed. 

Article 16. A bad condition results from the collection of surface 
water on Puritan road. The Surveyor of Highways recommends that 
a catch basin be built in Puritan road to collect this water and to drain 
it through the way at the easterly end of Whales Beach. We recom- 
mend that this work be done under the direction of the Board of 
Selectmen and the Surveyor of Highways, in accordance with the pro- 
visions of the by-laws relating to the awarding of contracts, and that 
the sum of seven hundred dollars be appropriated therefor from the 
Excess and Deficiency Fund. 

Article 17. The Surveyor of Highways recommends the building 
of a catch basin at the corner of Cherry street and Hillside avenue to 
care for surface water that collects in this vicinity. We recommend 
that this work be done under the direction of the Board of Selectmen 
and the Survej^or of Highways, in accordance with the provisions of 
the by-laws relating to the awarding of contracts, and that the sum of 
six hundred and fift}' dollars be appropriated therefor from the Excess 
and Deficiency Fund. 

Article 18. Water collects on Humphrey street near Forest avenue 
and Puritan road. Frequently this water spreads over Humphrey street 
and in cold weather becomes frozen on the surface of the road. This 
presents a dangerous condition for travel. We are advised by the Town 
Engineer that the present condition of some of the streets mentioned 
in Article 10 is due to the presence of water from this source. We 
have conferred with the Town Engineer and he has made a plan for 
a drain that will correct the condition arising from this water. We 
recommend that a drain be laid in accordance with plans made by the 
Town Engineer; that the Board of Selectmen be authorized to sign and 
deliver a contract in behalf of the town for this work, and that the sum 
of four thousand dollars be appropriated therefor to be raised by bonds 
or notes of the town. 

Article 19. The Surveyor of Highways recommends the construc- 
tion of a gate at the outlet to Palmer's Pond and estimates that the cost 
thereof will be $200. We recommend that this work be done under the 
direction of the Survej^or of Highwa3's and that two hundred dollars be 
appropriated therefor from the Excess and Deficiency Fund. 

Article 20. This article concerns the building of a drain in Aspen 
road to care for surface water. During heavy rains this area becomes 
flooded, and great annoyance and some damage result. To correct the 
condition easements must be obtained through certain premises. We 
believe that this work should be done, but not until easements are 
granted by the owners of the land through which the water must be 
drained. W^e recommend that this work be done in accordance with 
plans made by the Town Engineer, and in compliance with the by-laws 
relating to the letting of contracts, and that for this purpose the Board 
of Selectmen be authorized to make, sign and deliver a contract in the 
name and behalf of the town, and that the sum of twentj'-five hundred 
iiollars be appropriated therefor from the Excess and Deficiency Fund, 
on the condition, however, that any vote passed under this recom- 
mendation shall not become effective until all necessary easements have 



40 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



been granted to the town without the paj^ment of any money, and until 
waivers have been signed by all property- owners releasing the town from 
all damage in consequence of this work. 

Article 21. The work required to be done by this article is covered 
by an article in the w^arrant for a special town meeting and we there- 
fore recommend that action under this article be indefinitely postponed. 

Article 22. We recommend that Lewis road as laid out by the 
Board of Selectmen be accepted as a public way and that the sum of 
four hundred seventy-five dollars be appropriated from the Excess and 
Deficiency Fund to put it in condition for public travel and to be ex- 
pended under the direction of the Surveyor of Highways: on the con- 
dition, however, that this vote shall not become effective until the Town 
Engineer certifies in writing to the Board of Selectmen that there has 
been a compliance with Section 8 of Chapter 7 of the bj'-laws, and that 
all property owners have signed waivers releasing the town from all 
damage in consequence of such acceptance and of any work that may be 
done thereon. 

Article 23. There are about four houses upon this street. These 
houses abut on that part of the street that is in fair condition for travel. 
The remaining part of the street, however, descends in a sharp grade to 
Pleasant street for a distance of about 330 feet and there are no houses 
upon this part of the street. No road has ever been wrought upon this 
part of the street, and it exists merely on paper. If this street were 
accepted as a public way, the Town Engineer estimates that $3,500 
would be required to put it in condition for public travel. The direct 
benefit would be confined to four abutters. We recommend that action 
under this article be indefinitely postponed. 

Article 24. All the land abutting on Nason road is occupied by 
houses. The street is in bad condition. We recommend that Nason 
road as laid out by the Board of Selectmen be accepted as a public way, 
and that the sum of thirteen hundred dollars be appropriated from the 
Excess and Deficiency Fund to put it in condition for travel to be ex- 
pended under the direction of the Surveyor of Highwaj^s; on the con- 
dition, however, that this vote shall not become efifective until the Town 
Engineer has certified in writing to the Board of Selectmen that there 
has been a compliance with section 8 of Chapter 7 of the by-laws, and 
that all property owners have signed and delivered waivers releasing 
the town from all damage in consequence of such acceptance and of any 
work that may be done thereon. 

Article 25. Cedar road leads from Nason road. Houses occupy all 
land abutting on this street. It is in bad condition. We recommend 
that Cedar road as laid out by the Board of Selectmen be accepted as 
a public way and that the sum of four hundred and seventy-five dollars 
be appropriated from the Excess and Deficiency Fund to put it in con- 
dition for public travel, to be expended under the direction of the 
Survej^or of Highways; on the condition, however, that this vote shall 
not become effective until the Town Engineer has certified in writing 
to the Board of Selectmen that there has been a compliance with Section 
8 of Chapter 7 of the b3'-Iaws and that all property owners have signed 
and delivered waivers releasing the town from all damage in conse- 
quence of such acceptance and of any work that may be done thereon. 

Article 26. Mr. William D. Rowe, whose name is attached to this 
article, states that it would be unwise for the town at this time to accept 
the street therein described. We therefore recommend that action under 
this article be indefinitely postponed. 

Article 27. Francis road is a short street connecting Humphrey 
street with Morton road. There are houses upon all the land abutting 
on this street. It is in bad condition. We recommend that Francis road 
as laid out by the Board of Selectmen be accepted as a public wa3% and 
that the sum of six hundred dollars be appropriated from the Excess 
and Deficiency Fund to put it in condition for public travel, to be ex- 
pended under the direction of the Surveyor of Highways; on the 



1929] 



RECORDS OF TOWN CLERK 



41 



condition, however, that this vote shall not become effective until the 
Town Engineer has certified in writing to the Board of Selectmen that 
there has been a compliance with Section 8 of Chapter 7 of the by-laws 
and that all property owners have signed and delivered waivers releas- 
ing the town from all damage in consequence of such acceptance and 
of any work that may be done thereon. 

Article 28. An inspection of Ocean View road shows a sharp grade 
to Pleasant street. There is only one house upon this street as laid 
out by the Board of Selectmen. It would cost $5,600 to do the work 
that would be required to put this street in safe condition for public 
travel. We recommend that action under this article be indefinitely 
postponed. 

Article 29. There was an article in the warrant for the annual town 
meeting last year requesting the acceptance of Bay View Drive. At 
that time there was only one house upon this street. Since then, how- 
ever, other houses have been built and plans for several other buildings 
are now under contemplation. The road was built by the person who 
developed the section at great expense, and in a manner to conform 
with the requirements of the Board of Survey Act. There is at present 
a great deal of travel over the road, and it should be placed in a condi- 
tion so that it can be conveniently used by the property- owners thereon. 
We recommend that Bay View Drive, as laid out by the Board of 
Selectmen, be accepted as a public wa.y, and that the sum of thirty-five 
hundred dollars be appropriated from the Excess and Deficiency Fund 
to put in condition for public travel, to be expended under the direction 
of the Surveyor of Highways; on the condition, however, that this vote 
shall not become effective until the Town Engineer has certified in 
writing to the Board of Selectmen that there has been a compliance 
with Section 8 of Chapter 7 of the by-laws and that all property owners 
have signed and delivered waivers releasing the lown from all damages 
in consequence of such acceptance and of any work that may be done 
thereon. 

Article 37. We are informed by the Board of Selectmen that this 
article appears in the form of an article in the warrant for a special 
meeting and we recommend that action under this article be indefinitely 
postponed. 

Article 38. This article contemplates the extension of King's Brook 
culvert from the railroad to Essex street. This territory is now drained 
in part by an open brook and in part by pipes under the ground. This 
method of drainage is inadequate, and frequently results in damage to 
abutting property owners and might easily become a nuisance en- 
dangering the health of the community. The article provides for the 
extension of the culvert from the railroad to Essex street. Our exam- 
ination of the area shows that the water for a substantial distance passes 
through an open brook and thence into the culvert at Superior street. 
We believe that the area between the terminus of the culvert at Superior 
street and the railroad should be included in this improvement. We 
recommend that the Water and Sewerage Board be authorized to make, 
sign and deliver a contract in behalf of the town for the building of a 
drain from the present terminus of the culvert in Superior street to 
Essex street, in accordance with plans and specifications made by the 
Town Engineer; that all necessary easements be obtained by said Board 
without the payment of any money; that all property owners sign 
waivers releasing the town from any damage resulting from any work 
that may be done thereon; and that the sum of thirteen thousand dollars 
be appropriated therefor to be raised by bonds or notes of the town. 

Article 39. The laying of this water main is recommended by the 
Water and Sewerage Board. We recommend that a six-inch water 
main be laid in Dukes street from Stetson avenue, a distance of about 
400 feet, and that the sum of eighteen hundred fifty dollars be appro- 
priated therefor from the revenue of the Water Department, but on the 
condition that the Town Engineer shall certify in writing to the Board 



42 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



of Selectmen that the street conforms in line and grade with the plan 
approved by the Board of Survey; that all abutters shall sign an agree- 
ment to pay six per cent interest on the investment until the water rates 
of the users equal the interest thereon; and that proper waivers, without 
the payment of any money, shall be obtained from all abutters if, in 
the judgment of the Water and Sewerage Board, waivers are necessary 
for the protection of the town. 

Article 40. We recommend that a six-inch water main be laid 
in Plymouth avenue from the end of the present main in said avenue,, 
a distance of 250 feet, and that the sum of thirteen hundred twenty-five 
dollars be appropriated therefor from the revenue of the Water Depart- 
ment subject, however, to the conditions contained in the recommenda- 
tion under Article 39. 

Article 41. We are informed that there are no buildings upon this 
road and that there is no immediate use for water. We therefore recom- 
mend that action under this article be indefinitely postponed. 

Article 42. We are informed that this article is covered by an article 
in the warrant for a special town meeting and we therefore recommend 
t,hat action under this article be indefinitely postponed. 

Article 43. This article seeks the location of a fire alarm box near 
the corner of Kensington lane and Lewis road. This is recommended 
by the Board of Engineers of the Fire Department. We recommend 
that this work be done and that the sum of two hundred dollars be 
appropriated therefor from the Excess and Deficiency Fund. 

Article 44. This article relates to the installation of a fire alarm 
box near the corner of Humphrey street and Harrison avenue. This 
is recommended by the Board of Engineers of the Fire Department. 
We recommend that this work be done and that the sum of two hundred 
dollars be appropriated therefor from the Excess and Deficiency Fund. 

Article 50. For some time there has been need for added space for 
keeping safely those records of the town that are at present exposed 
to loss or damage. The officials chiefly interested are the Town Clerk, 
Town Accountant, Town Treasurer and the Town Engineer. We 
conferred with these officers and recommended that an architect be 
emplo3^ed for making an addition to the Town Hall that would provide 
sufficient space for storage purposes. This has accordingly been done. 
The plans show a space adjacent to the offices now occupied by the 
Town Clerk and the Town Treasurer about six feet in width with a 
cellar thereunder. We are informed that this will provide ample means 
for the storage of all records that should be safeguarded. The estimated 
cost of this work will be $6,000. We recommend that this work be done 
under the direction of the Board of Selectmen in accordance with plans 
and specifications made by Charles V. Burgess, architect, and in pur- 
suance of the provisions of the by-laws relating to the letting of con- 
tracts, and that for this purpose the sum of six thousand dollars be 
appropriated to be raised by bonds or notes of the town. 

Article 51. This article concerns the appropriation of money to 
reduce mosquito breeding in Palmer's Pond. It describes a condition 
that might be regarded as a public nuisance. We are advised, however, 
that the town meeting has no power to abate a nuisance, but that this 
authority can be exercised only by the Board of Health under the pro- 
visions of Chapter 111 of the General Laws. We recommend, there- 
fore, that action under this article be indefinitely postponed. 

Article 52. We recommend that action under this article be in- 
definitely postponed. 

Article 54, We recommend that the following unexpended balances 
from sewers be transferred to the Emergency Sewer Fund, namely: 
Franklin avenue sewer, $5,851.36; Fuller avenue sewer, $605.97; and 
Eastern Intercepting sewer, $9.06. 

Article 55. We recommend that action under this article be in- 
definitely postponed. 



1929] 



RECORDS OF TOWN CLERK 



43 



Article 57. We have made provisions for the commemoration of the 
three hundredth anniversary of the settlement of Lynn. We recommend 
therefore that action under this article be indefinitely postponed. 

Article 58. There is a balance of $163.97 due the contractor who 
did the work in connection with the cemetery during the year 1927. 
We recommend that this amount be paid and that it be taken from 
the Excess and Deficiency Fund. 

Article 59. This article relates to the |^ayment of $4,665.53 repre- 
senting our share of the loss sustained by the county by reason of the 
closing of the Tremont Trust Co. in 1921. When the Tremont Trust 
Co. was closed, the County of Essex had on deposit a substantial sum 
of money. Some dividends have been paid by the liquidating agent, but 
it is now necessary for the county to absorb the remaining loss. Sec- 
tion 1 of Chapter 66 of the acts of 1929 authorizes the County Com- 
missioners to assess this loss upon the communities within the hospital 
district at that time. The^amount assessed upon Swampscott is $4,665.53. 
We recommend that this amount be paid and that it be appropriated 
from the Excess and Deficiency Fund. 

Article 60. We have made provision for this matter in the budget 
and we recommend that further action concerning it be indefinitely 
postponed. 

Article 61. We have made provision in the budget for the appro- 
priation of $500 for the observance of Memorial Day, and we recommend 
that this amount be apportioned by the Board of Selectmen among the 
Grand Army, Leon E. Abbott Post 57 of the American Legion, and 
Joseph L. Stevens Post 1240 of the Veterans of Foreign Wars. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES W. SANTRY, Chairman, 
RALPH J. CURTIS, 
CHARLES F. HATHAWAY, 
CHESTER A. BROWN, 
RALPH H. CARY, 
DONALD REDFERN, 
PAUL W. BRICKETT, 
JOHN A. WALDO, 

Finance Committee. 



44 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



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1929] 



RECORDS OF TOWN CLERK 



45 



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46 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



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1929] 



RECORDS OF TOWN CLERK 



47 



TRANSFERS 
From Excess and Deficiency Fund 



PoHce Motorcycles $530.00 

Police Side Cars 230.00 

New F. A. Box Stanley School 250.00 

Hydrant Rental 1,000.00 

New Hose 500.00 

Essex Street Bridge 600.00 

Danvers Street Bridge 800.00 

Tercentenary 200.00 

Puritan Park Streets 1,500.00 

Crescent Street 250.00 

Catch Basin Puritan Road 700.00 

Catch Basin Cherry Street 650.00 

Manhole Palmer's Pond 200.00 

Drain Aspen Road - 2,500.00 

Lewis Road 475.00 

Nason Road 1,300.00 

Cedar Road 475.00 

Francis Road 600.00 

Fire Alarm Box Lewis Road 200.00 

Fire Alarm Box Harrison Avenue 200.00 

McDermott Bill 163.97 

County Deficit 4,665.53 

Municipal Buildings 6,000.00 

Awards and Executions 1,083.20 

New Street Construction 6,000.00 

New Sewer Construction 6,000.00 

Humphrey Street 5,000.00 



$43,270.90 

From Municipal Insurance Fund Income 

Insurance 2.133.45 

From Municipal Insurance Fund 

Insurance 1,019.70 

From Cemetery Lots Fund Income 

Cemetery Improvements 1,994.31 

Truck 500.00 

From Cemetery Lots Fimd 

Cemetery Improvements 1,005.69 

From Water Revenue 

Water 61,955.00 

Dukes Street 1.850.00 

Plymouth Avenue 1,325.00 

From Walker Road Sewer 

Walker Road Sewer Extension 1,208.03 

From Redington Street School 

High School Committee 801.90 

Bonded Articles 

Surface Franklin Avenue 13.000.00 

Street Construction 20,000.00 

Drain Humphrey Street 4.000.00 

Bay View Drive 3,500.00 

Eastern Intercepting Sewer 31,000.00 



48 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



Sewer, Phillips Avenue 

Sewer, Bradlee Avenue 

Sewer, Humphrej^ and Ocean Avenue 

Sewer, Bristol Avenue 

Sewer. Sargent Road and Prospect Avenue 
Sewer, Barnstable Street 
King's Brook Culvert 
Town Hall Vault 
Highway Stable 



$5,100.00 

12,000.00 
1,400.00 
4,300.00 
4,500.00 
1,900.00 

13,000.00 
6,000.00 

17,500.00 



Transfers from Excess and Deficiency 



$137,200.00 
18,000.00 



Net Amount to be Borrowed 



$119,200.00 



Voted, that tlie recommendations of the Finance Committee, be 
accepted and adopted as follows: That all recommendations in the 
reports of officers or committees requiring appropriations appear in 
the form of an article in the warrant; that departments refrain from 
including in their recommendations money for their fixed expenses, 
these properl}^ should appear in their budgets for that is the only w^ay 
in which the voters can learn the amount of money that each depart- 
ment is spending. 

Voted, Article 4. To accept the report of the Finance Committee 
and adopt their recommendations: That the salaries of all town officers 
for the ensuing year be the same as those of last year. 

Voted, Article 7. To accept the report of the Finance Committee 
and adopt their recommendations as follows: 

That a sewer be built in Walker road from the present terminus 
of the sewer in this road, in a northerly direction for a distance of 
about 125 feet and that the sum of $1,208.03 be appropriated therefor by 
transfer from the unexpended balance of the Walker Road Sewer. 

That the Trustees of the Public Library be given further time to 
consider the finishing of the upper room, for a children's room, and 
that a report be made concerning it to the next annual town meeting; 
that action on all other recommendations of the Trustees be indefinitely 
postponed. 

That the appropriation of $3,000 be made for the preparation of 
land to meet the demand of lots in the cemeter}^ from the receipts 
arising from the sale of lots in the cemetery. 

That the Superintendent of the cemetery be authorized to purchase 
a one-half ton truck for use in the cemetery and that the sum of five 
hundred dollars be appropriated therefor from the receipts from the 
sale of lots; that action on all other recommendations of the Super- 
intendent be indefinitely postponed. 

That the Chief of Police confer with the Department of Public 
Works and Board of Selectmen on expense of installing and main- 
taining four traffic lights at the junction of New Ocean and Burrill 
streets, that further action under this recommendation be indefinitely 
postponed. 

That two J. D. L. 74 Twin Harley-Davidson motorcycles be pur- 
chased for the use of- the Police Department, to replace unserviceable 
equipment, and that the sum of $530 be appropriated therefor from 
the Excess and Deficiency Fund. 

That purchase be made of two Harley-Davidson side cars to be 
used on J. D. L. 74 Twin Harley-Davidson motorcycles b}^ the Police 
Department, and that the sum of $230 be appropriated therefor from 
the Excess and Deficiency Fund. 

That the town appropriate the sum of $1750 for the following: 
Hydrant rental $1,000; for the installation of a fire alarm box at the 
Stanley School $250; for five hundred feet of lYz inch hose $500; said 
sums to be appropriated from the Excess and Deficiency Fund. 



1929] 



RECORDS OF TOWN CLERK 



49 



The following amendment to the Finance Committee recommend- 
ation was carried: 

That the town appropriate the sum of $5,000 for improving the fire 
alarm sj^stem, displacing part of the present overhead construction by 
underground cable with necessary connections. (Unanimous.) 

That the replanking of the Essex Street Bridge be done under the 
direction of the Surve3'or of Highway's in accordance with the pro- 
visions of the by-laws relating to the letting of contracts, and that the 
sum of $600 be appropriated therefor from the Excess and Deficiency 
Fund. 

That the abutment on the Danvers Street Bridge be pointed under 
the direction of the Surveyor of Highways, in pursuance of the pro- 
visions of the by-laws relating to the awarding of contracts, and that 
the sum of $800 be appropriated therefor from the Excess and Deficiency 
Fund. 

The appropriation of 5?200 from the Excess and Deficiency Fund 
to be expended under the direction of a committee of three residents 
of the town to be appointed by the Moderator for the Tercentenary 
observance. 

Indefinitely postponed action on the extension of the v.'hite way 
lights along Essex street to the railroad bridge, and along Humphrey 
street from Millett road to Phillips corner. 

That the sum of $17,500 be appropriated to be raised by notes or 
bonds of the town, for the erection of a stable suitable for the needs 
of the Highway Department, in pursuance of the plans and specifica- 
tions made by Charles V. Burgess, architect, and in accordance with 
by-laws relating to the awarding of contracts and that the Stable Com- 
mittee be authorized to make, sign and deliver in the name and behalf 
of the town a contract therefor. (Unanimous.) 

That the existing buildings on the Highway Department lot be 
removed to the back part of the lot or torn down was lost. 

That a committee be appointed to select a site suitable for a new 
high school building, to employ an architect, if this is deemed advisable 
by the committee, to prepare places and estimates for such a building 
and to report at a subsequent town meeting, concerning said site, the 
estimated cost thereof, a sketch or outline of said building, and the 
estimated cost of erecting and equipping it; said Committee shall con- 
sist of five persons to be appointed in the following manner, viz: one 
member from the School Committee to be designated by the School 
Committee and four citizens of the town to be appointed by the 
Moderator, and that the sum of S801.90 be appropriated by transfer 
from the Redington street school account, to be used by the Com- 
mittee for the above mentioned purposes. 

Voted: After consideration of Article 8 to take up the question of 
public hearing under Articles 46 and 47, and the consideration of same. 

Voted, Article 8. To accept the report of the Finance Committee 
and adopt their recommendations as follows: 

That the sum of $1083.20 be transferred from the account of Excess 
and Deficiency to the account of Awards and Executions for the pur- 
pose of paj^ing such awards as may be approved by the Board of 
Selectmen. 

That the sum of $5,000 be transferred from the account of Excess 
and Deficiency to the account of Humphrey street repairs for the pur- 
pose of making necessary repairs to the cement pavement in the vicinity 
of Phillips park, this amount together with the sum of $4,500 appro- 
priated in the Highway budget to be expended under the direction of 
the Surveyor of Highways and Board of Selectmen. 

That the sum of $2133.45 be transferred from the Municipal In- 
surance Fund Income and the sum of $1019.70 be transferred from the 
Municipal Insurance Fund for the purpose of paying premiums coming 
due this year on insurance held by the town on town property. 



50 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



That the sum of $61,955 be appropriated for the Water Department, 
the same to be taken from the Water revenue of the present year, 
under Chapter 396, Acts of 1928. 

Voted that the following amounts be appropriated for the various 
departments for the ensuing year. (Unanimous.) 

General Government 

Legislative 
Selectmen 
Accounting 
Treasury 

Collector of Taxes 
Assessors 
Tow^n Clerk 
" Law 

Election and Registration 
Engineering 
Town Hall 
Town Hall Repairs 
Certification of Notes and Bonds 
Board of Appeals 



' Protection of Life and Property 

Police $35,374.42 

Fire 39,840.00 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 555.00 

Moth 4,673.00 

Tree Warden 3,540.00 

Forest Warden 200.00 

Forest Warden Special 500.00 

Inspector of Buildings 1,250.00 

Subordinate Officials 630.00 

Health and Sanitation 

Health $9,670.00 

Dental Clinic 1,200.00 

I Health Nurse 1,350.00 

Cleaning Beaches 1,256.00 

Refuse and Garbage 12,865.00 

Health Dumps 1,700.00 

Sewer . 9,000.00 

Particular Sewers ~ 1,000.00 

Care of Brooks 500.00 

, Highways 

Highway Administration $2,900.00 

Highway 42,800.00 

Seal Coating 4,000.00 

Street Construction 3,000.00 

Street Watering and Oiling 4,000.00 

Sidewalk and Curbing 4,000.00 

Snow and Ice 6,000.00 

Lighting Streets 23,729.00 

Continuous Sidewalks 5,000.00 

Repairs on Equipment 600.00 

Humphrey Street Resurfacing 4,500.00 

Charities and Soldiers* Benefits 

Public Welfare $9,500.00 

Soldiers' Relief 5,500.00 

State Aid 500.00 

Military Aid 400.00 

Pensions 5,677.88 



$550.00 
3,775.00 
2,545.00 
2,303.00 
3,489.50 
4,200.00 

716.00 
2,000.00 
3,000.00 
6,600.00 
4,000.00 
1,500.00 
1,000.00 

250.00 



1929] 



RECORDS OF TOWN CLERK 



51 



Schools and Libraries 

School $164,446.50 

School Repairs 1,800.00 

Development of School Grounds 1,000.00 

Traveling Expenses Outside Commonwealth 116.00 

Library 7,500.00 

Recreation and Unclassified 

Parks $8,500.00 

Memorial Day 500.00 

Firemen's Memorial Sunday 200.00 

Heat and Light G. A. R. Hall 625.00 

Heat and Light V. F. W. Hall 200.00 

District Nurse 300.00 

Legion Lease 1,350.00 

Trust Fund Custodian's Bond 40.00 

Reserve Fund 5,000.00 

Printing Town Reports 1,270.10 

Unpaid Bills 250.00 

Overlay 1926 96.58 

Enterprises 

Cemetery $4,680.00 

Interest and Maturing Debt 

Interest on Loans in Anticipation of Revenue $10,000.00 

Interest on General Debt 12,457.50 

Interest on Sewer Loans 6,518.75 

Interest on Tuberculosis Hospital Bonds 1,960.00 

General Debt Maturing 35,606.25 

Sewer Loans Maturing 14,850.00 

Tuberculosis Hospital Bonds Maturing 4,000.00 

Agency 

Tuberculosis Hospital Maintenance $5,834.29 



At this time the Moderator declared a public hearing on Articles 
46 and 47. 

Starr Parsons spoke for the By-law and Henry S. Baldwin, A. A. 
Dooley, Clinton Johnson and James Foley against. The hearing con- 
tinued over one and one half hours, after which the Moderator declared 
same closed. 

Voted, Article 46. That action under this article be indefinitely 
postponed. 

Voted,-^ Article 46. That By-law be amended as proposed in Article 
47, so that the By-law as amended will then read as follows: 

ARTICLE II 
General Residence District 
In districts 1 and 2, except as herein otherwise provided no building 
shall be used, and no building shall be erected or altered which is 
intended or designed to be used for a store or shop, or for manufactur- 
ing or commercial purposes, or any other purpose except one or more 
of the following: 

1. Residence for not more than two families. 

2. Boarding, rooming, or lodging house. 

3. Church. 

4. Public school or other municipal building. 

5. Private school, library, museum, or other building of an educa- 
tional character. 

6. Club, except a club which carries on a business or is in the 
nature of a business. 

7. Park, playground, or community purpose. 



52 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



8. Farm, market garden, nursery or greenhouse. 

9. Private garage to be used by the occupants or owners of the 
premises, except that space in the same for not more than two cars 
may be rented. 

10. Private stable with provision for not more than two horses. 

11. Such accessory purposes as are customarily incident to the 
foregoing purposes, and are not injurious to a neighborhood as a place 
of residence, but such accessory purposes shall not include any bus- 
iness, industry, trade, manufacturing or commercial purpose. 

ARTICLE IV 
Business Districts 
In those areas in Districts 1 and 2 and indicated on the accompany- 
ing map in solid black, buildings may be used for business purposes 
provided that, in each case, after a public hearing of which fourteen 
days' notice shall be given in such manner as the Board of Selectmen 
may prescribe, said board shall determine that the purpose for which 
the building is sought to be used will not be substantially detrimental 
to the use of the property in the vicinity thereof. 

ARTICLE VII 
Setback Distance in General Residence District 
In Districts 1 and 2 no new buildings except those described in 
Article 4 shall be constructed and no building shall be altered, enlarged, 
extended, reconstructed, raised, or moved so that any part thereof, 
except steps, shall be located nearer than ten feet to any street line. 

And to further amend Article I by inserting between the word 
viz., and the numeral 2, the following: "1, General Residence District,'' 
so that said Article I shall then read as follows: 

ARTICLE I 
Authorization and Division 
By virtue and in pursuance of the powers delegated by Section 25 
to Section 33, inclusive, of Chapter 40 of the General Laws, the town 
of Swampscott is divided into the following districts, viz., 1, General 
Residence District; 2, General Residence District; 3, Single Residence 
District. 

And to further amend Article VI by adding a second paragraph 
reading as follows: "A zoning map of dictrict 1, prepared by W. W. 
Pratt, Town Engineer, dated January, 1929, bearing the signatures of 
the committee under whose direction the district has been laid out, is 
declared to be a part of this By-Law." 

The above amendment was carried by an unanimous vote; 90 
voting for and none against. 

Voted, Article 9. To accept the report of the Finance Committee 
and adopt their recommendations as follows: 

That a surface of bituminous macadam be laid in Franklin avenue, 
from Stetson avenue to Paradise road, in accordance with specifications 
approved by the Department of Public Works of the Commonwealth 
and that the Board of Selectmen be authorized to make, sign and 
deliver a contract in behalf of the town therefor, and that for this 
purpose the sum of $13,000 be appropriated to be raised by bonds or 
notes of the town. (Unanimous.) 

Voted, Article 10. To accept the report of the Finance Committee 
and adopt their recommendations. That the sum of $1500 be appro- 
priated from the Excess and Deficiency Fund to be used in placing 
the street named in this article in a safe condition for travel, the work 
to be done under the direction of the Surveyor of Highways. 

Voted, Article 11. Action under this article be indefinitely post- 
poned. 

Voted, Article 12, To accept the report of the Finance Committee 
and adopt their recommendations. 



1929] 



RECORDS OF TOWN CLERK 



53 



That the Board of Selectmen make, sign and deHver a contract in 
behalf of the town for the resurfacing of said Monument avenue and 
Walker road with bituminous macadam construction, in accordance 
with specifications approved by the Department of Public Works of 
the Commonwealth, and that for this purpose the sum of $20,000 be 
appropriated to be raised by bonds or notes of the town. (Unanimous.) 

Voted, Article 13. Action on this article be indefinitely postponed. 

Voted, Article 14. To accept the report of the Finance Committee 
and adopt their recommendations. 

That $250 be appropriated from the Excess and Deficiency Fund 
to reduce this ledge, to be expended under the direction of the Sur- 
veyor of Highways. 

Voted, Article 15. To request the Board of Selectmen to in- 
vestigate this matter for further action. 

Voted, Article 16. To accept the report of the Finance Committee 
and adopt their recommendations as follows: That the work contained 
in this article be done under the direction of the Board of Selectmen 
and the Surve3^or of Highways in accordance with the provisions of 
the by-laws relating to the awarding of contracts and that the sum of 
$700 be appropriated therefor from the Excess and Deficiency Fund. 

Voted, Article 17. To accept the Finance Committee report and 
adopt their recommendations. That the work under this article be done 
under the direction of the Board of Selectmen and the Surveyor of 
Highways, in accordance with the provisions of the by-laws relating 
to the awarding of contracts, and that the sum of §650 be appropriated 
therefor from the Excess and Deficiency Fund. 

Voted, that when we adjourn it be to Tuesday evening, March 26, 
1929, at 7:30 o'clock. 

A motion that the Moderator dispense with reading of the articles 
in the warrant, and that the Finance Committee dispense with the 
reading of their report except that part containing their recommend- 
ations was lost. 

Voted, Article 18. To accept the report of the Finance Committee 
and adopt their recommendations. 

That a drain be laid in accordance with plans made by Town 
Engineer; that the Board of Selectmen be authorized to sign and 
deliver a contract in behalf of the town for this work and that the 
sum of $4,000 be appropriated therefor, to be raised by bonds or notes 
of the town. (Unanimous.) 

Voted, Article 19. To accept the report of the Finance Committee 
and adopt their recommendations: 

That this work be done under the direction of the Surveyor of 
Highways and that $200 be appropriated from the Excess and De- 
ficiency Fund. 

Voted, Article 20. To accept the report of the Finance Committee 
and adopt their recommendations: 

That this work be done in accordance with the plans made by the 
Town Engineer and in compliance with the by-laws relating to the 
letting of contract and that for this purpose the Board of Selectmen 
be authorized to make, sign and deliver a contract in the name and 
behalf of the town and that the sum of $2,500 be appropriated therefor 
from, the Excess and Deficiency Fund on the condition, however, that 
any vote passed under this recommendation shall not become effective 
imtil all necessary easements have been granted to the town without 
payment of any money, and until waivers have been signed by all 
property owners releasing the town from all damage in consequence 
of this work. 

Voted to adjourn at 10:10 P. M. 
Attest: 

RALPH D. MERRITT. 

Town Clerk. 



54 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
Tuesday, March 26, 1929 

In accordance with the adjournment of March 25, 1929, the voters 
were called to order by John R. Hurlburt, Moderator, at 7:30 P. M., 
the necessar}' quorum being present. The records of last meeting 
(reading) were voted to be dispensed with. 

Voted. To take up Articles 21, 23, 26, 28 together, also to con- 
sider Articles 22, 24, 25, 27, 29 together. 

Voted, Articles 21, 23, 26, 28. To accept the report of the Finance 
Committee and adopt their recommendations as follows: 

Article 21. Action under this article be indefinitely postponed. 

Article 23, Action under this article be indefinitely postponed. 

Article 26. Action under this article be indefinitely postponed. 

Article 28. Action under this article be indefinitely postponed. 

Voted, Articles 22, 24, 25, 27, 29. To accept the report of the 
Finance Committee and adopt their recommendations as follows: 

Article 22. That Lewis road as laid out by the Board of Selectrnen 
be accepted as a public way and that the sum of $475 be appropriated 
from the Excess and Deficiency Fund to put it in condition for public 
travel, and to be expended under the direction of the Surveyor of High- 
ways, on the condition, however, that this vote shall not become effect- 
tive until the Town Engineer certifies in writing to the Board of Select- 
men that there has been a compliance with the By-laws and that all 
property owners have signed waivers releasing the town from all dam- 
age in consequence of such acceptance and of any work that may be 
done thereon. 

Article 24. That Nason road, as laid out by the Board of Select- 
men, be accepted as a public way, and that the sum of $1,300 be appro- 
priated from the Excess and Deficiency Fund to put it in condition for 
travel, to be expended under the direction of the Surveyor of High- 
ways, on the condition, however, that this vote shall not become effect- 
ive until the Town Engineer has certified in writing to the Board of 
Selectmen that there has been a compliance with the By-Laws and 
that all property owners have signed and delivered waivers releasing 
the town from all damage in consequence of such acceptance and of 
any work that may be done thereon. 

Article 25. That Cedar road as laid out by the Board of Select- 
men be accepted as a public way and that the sum of $475 be appro- 
priated from the Excess and Deficiency Fund to put it in condition for 
public travel, to be expended under the direction of the Surveyor of 
Highways, on condition, however, that this vote shall not become 
effective until the Town Engineer has certified in writing to the Board 
of Selectmen, that there has been a compliance with the By-Laws and 
that all property owners have signed and delivered waivers releasing 
the town from all damage in consequence of such acceptance and of 
any work that may be done thereon. 

Article 27. That Francis road as laid out by the Board of Select- 
men be accepted as a public way and that the sum of $600 be appro- 
priated from the Excess and Deficiency Fund to put it in condition 
for public travel, to be expended under the direction of the Surveyor 
of Highways, on condition, however, that this vote shall not become 
effective until the Town Engineer has certified in writing to the Board 
of Selectmen that there has been a compliance with the By-Laws and 
that all property owners have signed and delivered waivers releasing 
the town from all damage in consequence of such acceptance and of 
any work that may be done thereon. 

Article 29. That Bay View drive as laid out by the Board of 
Selectmen be accepted as a public way and that the sum of $3,500 be 
appropriated from the Excess and Deficiency Fund to put it in con- 
dition for public travel, to be expended under the direction of the 
Surveyor of Highways, on the condition, however, that this vote shall 



1929] 



RECORDS OF TOWN CLERK 



55 



not become effective until the Town Engineer has certified in writing 
to the Board of Selectmen that there has been a compliance with the 
By-Laws and that all property owners have signed and delivered 
waivers releasing the town from all damages in consequence of such 
acceptance and of any work that may be done thereon. 

Voted, Article 37. To accept the report of the Finance Committee 
and adopt their recommendation: That action under this article be 
indefinitely postponed. 

Voted, Article 38. To accept the report of the Finance Committee 
and adopt their recommendations as amended: 

That the Water and Sewerage Board be authorized to make, sign 
and deliver a contract in behalf of the town for the building of a drain 
from the present terminus of the culvert in Superior street to Essex 
street, in accordance with plans and specifications made by the Town 
Engineer; that all necessary easements be obtained by said Board, that 
all property owners sign waivers releasing the town from any damage 
resulting from any work that may be done thereon and that the sum 
of $13,000 be appropriated therefor by bonds or notes of the town. 
(Unanimous.) 

Voted, Article 29. To accept the report of the Finance Committee 
and adopt their recommendations as follows: 

That a six inch water main be laid in Dukes street, from Stetson 
avenue, a distance of about 400 feet, and that the sum of SI, 850 be 
appropriated therefor from the revenue of the Water Department, but 
on the condition that the Town Engineer shall certify in writing to the 
Board of Selectman that the street conforms in line and grade w^th the 
plan approved by the Board of Survey: that all abutters shall sign an 
agreement to pay six per cent interest on the investment until the 
water rates of the users equal the interest thereon, and that proper 
waivers without the payment of any money shall be obtained from all 
abutters if, in the judgment of the Water and Sewerage Board, waivers 
are necessary for the protection of the town. 

Voted, Article 40. To accept the report of the Finance Com.mittee 
and adopt their recommendations as follows: 

That a six inch water main be laid in Ph-mouth avenue from the 
end of the present main in said avenue, a distance of 250 feet, and 
that the sum of $1,325 be appropriated therefor from the revenue of 
the Water Department, subject, however, to the conditions contained 
in the recommendations under Article 39. 

Voted, Article 41. That action under this article be indefinitely 
postponed. 

Voted, Article 42. That action under this article be indefinitely 
postponed. 

Voted, Article 43. To accept the report of the Finance Committee 
and adopt their recommendations: That a fire alarm box be located 
near the corner of Kensington lane and Lewis road, and that the sum 
of $200 be appropriated therefor from the Excess and Deficiency Fund. 

Voted, Article 44. To accept the report of the Finance Committee 
and adopt their recommendations: That a fire alarm box be located 
near the corner of Humphrey street and Harrison avenue, and that 
the sum of $200 be appropriated therefor from the Excess and De- 
ficiency Fund. 

Under Article 48, the report of the Committee to investigate the 
taking of Black Wills CHflF for public park purposes was read by Henry 
S. Baldwin, Chairman. 



56 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE TO INVESTIGATE THE 
TAKING OF BLACK WILLS CLIFF FOR PUBLIC 
PARK PURPOSES 

To the Town Meeting Members: 

Under Article 48 of the warrant of February 18, 1929, the Mod- 
erator appointed a committee of eight to investigate the taking of the 
land situated on the south side of Humphrey street lying between 
Kings Beach on the west and Blaney Beach on the east, known as 
Black Wills Cliff, for the purpose of a public park, with instructions to 
report at the adjourned meeting. Although the time allowed has been 
short, the committee has held a number of meetings, one public hearing 
and has conferred with the ^letropolitan District Commission, and as 
a result submits the following report for your consideration. 

The problem is one of much importance, not only to the present 
generation but to the future of the town of Swampscott, and before 
entering into detail discussion of the matter, it would be well to outline 
in a few words some of the underlying conditions which now exist in 
the town and which have important bearing on the subject, 

Swampscott was set off from Lynn in 1852, and from that time 
until 1890 retained all the characteristics of a small sea coast town with 
fishing as its principal industry. In the summer months it was always 
a favorite resort for visitors on account of its beaches and natural 
advantages. In this period of thirty-eight years the tax rate increased 
from $4.60 to $10.50 per one thousand and the debt from $4,500 to 
$50,000. 

In 1890, the town began to expand as a residential communit}- and 
its present desirable development is due largely to the fact that con- 
siderable tracts of land were owned by individuals and were privateh' 
developed as such. This fact made it possible for us to enjoy the 
present excellent arrangement of streets. The eastern section of the 
town was owned by the Phillips Estate which was developed along 
broad lines, sites being sold onh- to friends and persons who were 
recommended. The Mudge Estate was developed along similar lines, 
the land being laid out by an eminent architect. The same is true of 
the Stetson Estate, Shaw Estate and a number of others until we have 
Swampscott of 1929. 

In these vears the tax rate moved up to S28.00 and the debt became 
$259,000, with an assessed valuation of $22,800,000. While these changes 
were taking place the citizens wisely provided themselves with all 
municipal improvements necessary for the protection of life, property, 
health and sanitation. They also provided liberally for education and 
charitable relief. Some provision was made for recreation, but the 
amounts expended have been small and the tracts which have been 
taken have never been developed. That portion of King's Beach, 
situated in Swampscott and now used by the public is a part of the 
Metropolitan Park System and under its control. 

In the past twenty-five years, the Legislature has enacted various 
forms of social legislation, initiated for the most part b}- towns of the 
Commonwealth to prevent the exploiting of their communities by 
unscrupulous and undesirable development, and to prevent acts of 
individual citizens which v/ould make the towns less desirable places 
in which to live. These acts had much merit and were generally ac- 
cepted by towns and cities. Among them might be mentioned Art 
Commissions, Planning Board, Board of Surveys, Tenement House 
Act and the Zoning Act. 

The last three have been accepted by the town, indicating a policy 
not only to protect the interests of its present citizens but at the same 
time giving notice that Swampscott is a desirable place in which to 
build homes protected from encroachment by places of business, ga- 
rages or three family houses which would not only lower the value of 
property, but change the general character of the neighborhood. The 



1929] 



RECORDS OF TOWN CLERK 



57 



policy established and carried out has done much to induce desirable 
residents to settle in the town and has materially added to its value. 

The Zoning By-Laws themselves were first thought of in con- 
nection with the Mudge and Stetson estates where twenty and thirty 
year restrictions were gradually expiring permitting buildings to appear 
on street lines and business enterprises to creep in. The act is simple 
and workable, and is accomplishing its purpose of keeping the town 
strictly residential. 

The remainder of the report will be devoted to the consideration 
of various plans by which Black Wills Cliff could be preserved for 
park purposes by the town or by the Commonwealth. 

Viewing the matter from the standpoint of taking of land by the 
town, 3'our committee has considered first, the entire area of Black 
Wills Cliff, and has then divided this into four groups of properties for 
your convenience. All data given has been obtained from the Assess- 
ors' Department and is correct as of 1928. The taking of the entire 
area will first be discussed: 

The area involved, the value represented, and the location at the 
gatewaj' to the town are such as to render the decision as to the 
development of Black Wills Cliff of the greatest moment to the future 
of Swampscott. 

This property has a frontage on Humphrey street of 1250 feet, and 
on the ocean or Nahant Bay, of 1800 feet. It contain^ 260,810 square* 
feet or about 6 acres of land which has an assessed value of §224,510.00, 
which amounts to eighty-two cents per square foot. It is owned by 
eighteen different groups, being individuals, families or trusts. There 
are twenty-six major buildings and five smaller structures. These 
buildings have an assessed value of $196,675. The Masonic block has 
an assessed value of S60,000, and the average assessed value of the 
remaining twenty-five buildings is $5,467. The portion of this property 
which lies within the business zoning district and extends from King's 
Beach to and including the Post Office has an assessed value of 
^75,375. The general character of this entire stretch of shore land has 
not materially changed during the last twenty-five years. What change 
is most noticeable is west of the Knowlton property. The total 
assessed value is S421,185, and in 1928, with a tax rate of $24 per one 
thousand, it paid SIO, 108.44 toward the cost of town government. 

If this property is to be taken for park purposes it must be by 
eminent domain, the ov.-ners having already indicated that no settle- 
ment could be made on the basis of valuation plus twenty-five per cent, 
as allowed by law. This means damages awarded in each case by the 
Superior Court after prolonged trials and the total final award with 
expense is a matter of speculation. We believe, however, that the 
minimum amount would be $600,000, and have had this amount in 
mind in drawing our conclusions. 

The total borrowing capacitv of the town, as prescribed bv the 
statutes, is S661,000, and if ?600,000 were allowed by the Legislature to 
be borrowed outside of the debt limit and spread over a period of thirty 
years, it would mean a payment of $47,000 the first year, or an average 
payment over the same period of S32.000. This would mean about 
$1.40 per thousand on the present tax of S24.00. The amount added to 
the tax rate the first year would be approximately S2.00. 

The cost of taking each of the four groups can easily be calculated 
in the same manner from the data given. While your committee is 
unanimously in favor of the entire taking, it is felt that the cost is too 
great to recommend at this time. The plan most favored from the 
standpoint of taking by the town is the area from King's Beach to the 
Masonic Club, which would mean an expenditure of alDout $300,000.00, 
or about one-half of the total already discussed. Before recommending 
this, however, your committee decided to confer with the Metropolitan 



58 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



District Commission, which was done; the following letter having 
been received stating their position: — 

"M,arch 22, 1929. 

"Mr. Henry S. Baldwin, 

"141 Elmwood Road, Swampscott, Mass. 

"Dear Sir: — Your letter of March 12, relative to taking of land on 
Black Wills Cliff, in Swampscott, for park purpose, was presented to 
the Commission at its meeting yesterday. The Commission considers 
that the acquirement of this land for park purposes would be a valuable 
addition to the Metropolitan Park System, but feels that there is 
somewhat of a question whether the expense would be justified. If 
the Legislature should provide the necessary funds, however, the Com- 
mission would be favorable to taking the land. 

Very truly yours, 

(signed) "GEO. LYMAN ROGERS, 

"Secretary." 

In many communities, large or small lots of land have been given 
by individuals for park purposes, and there is no reason why Swamp- 
scott should be an exception. We have residents who individually or 
as a group could afford to donate part or all of the land on Black Wills 
Cliff to the town. This plan is simply mentioned as a possibility. 
While your committee favors the ownership of this land by the town, 
it is felt that it is of such public interest to the entire Commonwealth, 
and, in fact, to the country at large, that the financial burden should 
not be borne by the town alone. 

It is our recommendation, therefore, that the Selectmen and Park 
Commissioners be instructed to prepare a bill for the taking of this 
land by the Commonwealth, to be added to the Metropolitan Park Sys- 
tem and present it to the Legislature. 

Table of Assessors' data for reference: 

Group 1: — Doane, Blaney, Bray, Blaisdell, Inglefinger, Post Office. 
Buildings $37,200.00 
Land 38,175.00 



Total $75,375.00 

Area, square feet. 30,567 

Total Tax $1,809.00 

Group 2: — Knowlton, Godfrej^ Bunting, Stuart. 

Buildings $49,225.00 

Land 88,500.00 



Total $137,725.00 

Area, square feet. 115,180 

Total Tax $3,305.40 

up 3: — Masonic Building. 

Building $60,000.00 

Land 15,950.00 



Total $75,950.00 
Area, square feet 18,600 
Total Tax $1,822.80 

Group 4:— Ward well, Titus, Colby, Foster, Blaney, Albree, Stanley. 
Buildings $50,250.00 
Land 81,885.00 



Total $132,135.00 

Area, square feet. . 96,463 

Total Tax $3,171.24 



1929] 



RECORDS OF TOWN CLERK 



5^ 



Group 5: — All land and buildings on Black Wills Cliff. 

Buildings $196,675.00 
Land '224,510.00 



Total $421,185.00 
Area, square feet. 260,810 
Total Tax $10,108.44 

HENRY S. BALDWIN, Chairman, 
JOSEPH ATWOOD, Clerk, 
JAMES D. BENTLEY, 
JAMES A. COOK, 
^ GEORGE J. HARVEY, 
ROBERT B. HEGARTY, 
CLARENCE B. HUMPHREY, 
EDWARD LACROIX, 

Committee. 

Voted, Article 48. To accept the report of the Committee and 
adopt their recommendations as follows: 

That the Selectmen and Park Commissioners be instructed to 
prepare a bill for the taking of this land by the Commonwealth, ta 
be added to the Metropolitan Park System and present it to the 
Legislature. (Unanimous.) 

The report of the Committee, to consider the needs of a new Town 
Hall, was read by Howard K. Glidden, Chairman. 

Voted, Article 49. To accept the report of the Committee on a 
new Town Hall, and adopt their recommendations as follows : That 
the Committee give the matter further study in order that it may be 
able to see built a more comprehensive report at the next annual town 
meeting. 

Voted, Article 50. To accept the report of the Finance Committee 
and adopt their recommendations as follows: 

That the town construct a new vault at the Town Hall, under the 
direction of the Board of Selectmen in accordance with plans and 
specifications made by Charles V. Burgess, architect, and in pursuance 
of the provisions of the by-laws relating to the letting of contracts 
and that for this purpose the sum of S6,000 be appropriated, to be raised 
by notes or bonds of the town. (Unanimous.) 

Voted, Article 51. Action under this article be indefiniteh^ post- 
poned. 

Voted, Article 52. Action under this article be indefinitely post- 
poned. 

Voted, Article 54. To accept the report of the Finance Committee 
and adopt their recommendations as follows: That the following unex- 
pended balances from sewers be transferred to the Emergency Sewer 
Fund, namely: Franklin avenue sewer, $3,851.36; Fuller avenue sew^er, 
$605.97, and Eastern Intercepting sewer, $9.06. 

The report of the Sewer Commissioners on the cost and assess- 
ments of sewers was read by Charles E. Hodgkins. 

Voted to accept their report, and that a committee of five be 
appointed by the Moderator, to study the present method of making 
sewer assessments and report with their recommendations at any sub- 
sequent town meeting, said committee to include one member of the 
Board of Selectmen and one member of the Board of Sewer Com- 
missioners, and the Town Counsel. 

Voted, Article 55. To accept the report of the Finance Committee 
and adopt their recommendations as follows. Action under this article 
be indefinitely postponed. 

Voted, Article 57. To accept the report of the Finance Committee 
and adopt their recommendations. Action under this article be in- 
definitely postponed. 

Voted, Article 58. To accept the report of the Finance Com- 
mittee and adopt their recommendations. That the sum of $163.97 



60 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



be taken from the Excess and Deficiency Fund and pay the contractor, 
P. J. McDermott, for work done in Swampscott Cemetery during the 
year 1927. 

Voted, Article 59. To accept the report of the Finance Committee 
and adopt their recommendations as follows: That the sum of $4,665.53 
be appropriated from the Excess and Deficiency Fund to pay the 
assessment due the County of Essex under Section 1 of Chapter 66, 
Acts of 1929. 

Voted, Article 60. To accept the report of the Finance Committee 
and adopt their recommendations: That further action concerning this 
article be indefinitely postponed. 

Voted, Article 61. To accept the report of the Finance Committee 
and adopt their recommendations as follows: That the $500 appro- 
priated for Memorial Day be apportioned by the Board of Selectmen 
among the G. A. R., Leon E. Abbott Post 57, A. L., and Joseph L. 
Stevens Post 1240, V. F. W. 

Voted, Article 62. To accept the report of the Finance Committee 
and adopt their recommendations as follows: 

For the purposes specified in Article 18 which relates to the appro- 
priation of four thousand ($4,000) dollars for laying a drain to care for 
surface water on Humphrey street; and for the purposes specified in 
Articles 30 to 36 inclusive, which relate respectively to the appro- 
priation of fifty-four thousand ($54,000) dollars to extend the eastern 
intercepting trunk line sewer, the appropriation of fifty-one hundred 
($5,100) dollars for the building of a sewer in Phillips avenue from 
Estabrook road to Stanwood road, the appropriation of twelve thousand 
($12,000) dollars for the building of a sewer in Bradlee avenue and 
Atlantic avenue southwesterly from Ocean avenue, the appropriation 
of fourteen hundred ($1,400) dollars for the building of a sewer in 
Humphrey street and Ocean avenue, the appropriation of forty-three 
hundred ($4,300) dollars for the building of a sewer in Bristol avenue 
and Stetson avenue, the appropriation of forty-five hundred ($4,500) 
dollars for the building of a sewer in Sargent road and Prospect street, 
the appropriation of nineteen hundred ($1,900) dollars for the building 
of a sewer in Barnstable street and Stetson avenue, and for the pur- 
poses specified in Article 38, which relates to the appropriation of 
thirteen thousand ($13,000) dollars for the extension of King's Brook 
Culvert, which appropriations aggregate one hundred thousand two 
hundred ($100,200) dollars; that the sum of six thousand (S6,000) dol- 
lars be appropriated from the Excess and Deficiency Fund and that 
the treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, be authorized to 
borrow a sum not exceeding the remainder, namely ninety-four thou- 
sand two hundred ($94,200) dollars and to issue bonds or notes of 
the town therefor, said bonds or notes to be signed by the Treasurer 
and countersigned by a majority of the Selectmen and to be issued 
and payable in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 44 of the 
General Laws and any Acts in Amendment thereof, or in addition 
thereto, and of Clause 1 of Chapter 324 of the Acts of 1928; so that 
the whole loan shall be paid in not more than thirty years from the 
date of the issue of the first bond or note or at such earlier times as the 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen may determine. Said 
bonds or notes shall be denominated on the face thereof "Swampscott 
Sewer Loan 1929" and shall bear such rates of interest as may be fixed 
by the Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen. 

For the purposes specified in Article 50 which relates to the 
appropriation of six thousand ($6,000) dollars for added floor space 
in the town hall for a vault; and for the purposes specified in the 
report of the Stable Committee on Page 233 of the town report and the 
vote of the town thereunder which relates to the appropriation of 
seventeen thousand five hundred ($17,500) dollars for the erection 
of a stable for the Highway Department; which appropriations aggre- 
gate twenty-three thousand five hundred ($23,500) dollars that the 



1929] 



RECORDS OF TOWN CLERK 



61 



treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen, be authorized to borrow 
a sum not to exceed twenty-three thousand five hundred (|23,500) 
dollars and to issue bonds or notes of the tow^n therefor to be signed 
by the Treasurer and countersigned by a majority of the Selectmen^ 
and to be issued and payable in accordance with the provisions of 
Chapter 44 of the General Laws and any Acts in amendment thereof 
or in addition thereto, and of Clause 3 of Chapter 324 of the Acts of 
1928, so that the whole loan shall be paid in not more than twenty years 
from the date of the issue of the first bond or note or at such earlier 
times as the Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen may deter- 
mine. Said bonds or notes shall be denominated on the face thereof 
"Swampscott Stable and Vault Loan 1929" and shall bear such rates of 
interest as may be fixed by the Treasurer, with the approval of the 
Selectmen. 

For the purposes specified in Article 9 which relates to the appro- 
priation of thirteen thousand ($13,000) dollars for resurfacing Franklin 
avenue from Stetson avenue to Paradise road, and for the purposes 
specified in our recommendations under Article 12, which relates to 
the appropriation of twenty thousand ($20,000) dollars for resurfacing 
Monument avenue and Walker road, which appropriation aggregate 
thirty-three thousand ($33,000) dollars, that six thousand ($6,000) dol- 
lars thereof be appropriated from the Excess and Deficiency Fund^ 
and that the Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen, be author- 
ized to borrow a sum not to exceed the remainder, namely, twenty- 
seven thousand ($27,000) dollars; and to issue bonds or notes of the 
town therefor, said bonds or notes to be signed by the Treasurer and 
countersigned by a majority of the Selectmen, and to be issued and 
payable in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 44 of the General 
Laws and any Acts in amendment thereof or in addition thereto 
and of Clause 6 of Chapter 324 of the Acts of 1928, so that the whole 
loan shall be paid in not more than five years from the date of the 
issue of the first bond or note or at such earlier times as the Treasurer 
with the approval of the Selectmen, may determine. Said bonds or 
notes shall be denominated on the face thereof 'Swampscott Street 
Loan 1929" and shall bear such rates of interest as may be fixed by 
the Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen. (Unanimous.) 

Voted, a note of thanks was given the Moderator, John R. Hurl- 
burt, by the Town Meeting members. (Unanimous.) 

Voted to dissolve at 9:30 P. M. 



John R. Hurlburt, Moderator, appointed the following committees 
on above date. 



Attest: 



RALPH D. MERRITT, 

Town Clerk. 



COMMITTEE APPOINTMENTS 



March 27, 1929. 



Revision of By-Laws 



Harry D. Linscott, chairman 
Guy N. Chamberlin, 
Rufus W. Greene 
Conrad P. Richardson 
Edward S. Underwood 



78 Greenwood ave. 
25 Sheridan road 
78 Millett road 
15 Beverly road 
26 Walker road 



Fourth of July Committee 



Ralph J. Curtis 
John A. Holmes 
George H. Knowlton 
Robert E. Blood 
George B. Learned 
Nathaniel F. Bartlett 
Frank H. VanBlarcom 
Fred A. Hale 



Precinct 1 
Precinct 2 
Precinct 3 
Precinct 4 
Precinct 5 
Precinct 6 
Precinct 7 
Precinct 8 



62 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



Committee on Sewer Investigation 

Philip W. Blood 33 Rockland street 

George D. R. Durkee 4 Upland road 

Howard K. Glidden 49 Rockland street 

Edward LaCroix 58 Orchard road 

Harry D. Linscott 78 Greenwood ave. 

300th Anniversary Committee 
Kendall A. Sanderson, Chairman Bay View ave. 

Henry S. Baldwin 141 Elmwood road 

Dr. Charles H. Bangs 293 Humphrey street 

Attest: 

RALPH D. MERRITT, 

Town Clerk. 
April 2, 1929. 

John R. Hurlburt, Moderator, appointed the following committee 
under Article 7 of the warrant, to select a suitable site for the new 
High School. 

Henry S. Baldwin, chairman 141 Elmwood road 

Philip E. Bessom 20 Aspen road 

H. Allen Durkee 2 Essex terrace 

Charles I. Porter 2 Palmer ave. 

Attest: 

RALPH D. MERRITT, 

Town Clerk. 
April 4, 1929. 

John R. Hurlburt, Moderator, appointed Charles E. Hodgdon, 95 
Banks road, on the Fourth of July Committee, in place of George B. 
Learned, who resigned from said committee. 
Attest: 

RALPH D. MERRITT, 

Town Clerk, 
April 6, 1929. 

Eleanor Ingelfinger, Cliffside, appointed on the Fourth of July 
Committee, in place of Nathaniel F. Bartlett, who resigned from said 
committee. ^ Robert C. McKay, 11 Eulow street, appointed on com- 
mittee to investigate a location for New High School, in place of 
Charles I. Porter, who resigned from said committee, above appoint- 
ments made by John R. Hurlburt, Moderator. 
Attest: 

RALPH D. MERRITT, 

Town Clerk. 
April 4, 1929. 

Notice received from the School Committee that they had 
appointed George C. Thomas, as their representative on the High 
School Building Committee. 
Attest: 

RALPH D. MERRITT, 

Town Clerk. 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
Tuesday, April 16, 1929 

Essex ss. 

To either of the Constables of the Town gf Swampscott in said County, 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts you are 
directed to notify the inhabitants of the Town of Swampscott, qualified 
to vote in elections and in town affairs, to assemble in their respective 
precincts in said Swampscott, on Tuesday, the sixteenth day of April 
at 2 P. M., then and there to act on the following question, viz: 

To vote Yes or No by ballot on the following question: 



1929] 



RECORDS OF TOWN CLERK 



63 



Shall the report of the committee appointed under Article 48 of the 
annual town meeting of 1929 to investigate the taking of Black Will's 
Cliff for public park purposes, viz: — That the Selectmen and Park Com- 
missioners be instructed to prepare a bill for the taking of this land 
by the Commonwealth, to be added to the Metropolitan Park System, 
and present said bill to the Legislature — be accepted and its recom- 
mendation adopted. 

The polls will close at 9 P. M. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an attested 
copy thereof at the Town Hall, the post offices, at least one public and 
conspicuous place in each precinct in the town, and at or in the im- 
mediate vicinity of each railroad station in the town, seven days before 
the day appointed for said meeting. 

Hereof fail not, and make due return of this warrant, with your 
doings thereon, to the Town Clerk at the time and place of meeting 
aforesaid. 

Given under our hands this second day of April, A. D., 1929. 

HOWARD K. GLIDDEN, 
R. WYER GREENE, 
DANIEL F. KNOWLTON, 

Selectmen of Swampscott. 

A true copy. Attest: 

FRANK H. BRADFORD, Constable. 

RETURN ON THE WARRANT 

Pursuant to the within warrant to me directed, I have notified 
the legal voters of Swampscott, by posting attested copies of said war- 
rant at the Town Hall, Post Offices, at least one public and con- 
spicuous place in each precinct in the town, and at or in the immediate 
vicinity of each railroad station in Swampscott on Saturday, April 6, 
1929, the posting of said notices being seven days before the time of 
said meeting. 

FRANK H. BRADFORD, 

Constable. 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
Tuesday, AprU 16, 1929 

In accordance with the warrant, the voters of Swampscott assem- 
bled at the voting places in the several precincts and were 
called to order at 2 P. M. by their presiding officer in each pre- 
cinct, the warrant calling the meeting with the return thereon was 
read by the clerk in each precinct. 

The following were appointed precinct officers and qualified for 
same: 

Precinct 1. Warden, Edward H. Jordan; Clerk, Robert B. He- 
garty; Inspectors, Robert L. Cunningham, Lewis A. Coleman. 

Precinct 2. Warden, Harry E. Cahoon; Clerk, James D. Bentley; 
Inspectors, William P. Norcross, John E. Burns. 

Precinct 3. Warden, Stuart P. Ellis; Clerk, Albert Stone; In- 
spectors, Charles E. Melzard, Robert L. Douglass. 

Precinct 4. Warden, Lewis N. Crocker; Clerk, Donald S. Sawyer; 
Inspectors, John B. Cahoon, Charles E. Souther. 

Precinct 5. Warden, Albert Enholm; Clerk, Raymond H. Owen; 
Inspectors, Walter L. Kehoe; Irving A. Curtis. 

Precinct 6. Warden, Herman E. Story; Clerk, Timothy J. Ryan; 
Inspectors, Arthur C. Eaton, George H. Coan. 

Precinct 7. Warden, Henry J. Butt; Clerk, Helen Parker; In- 
spectors, Walter Lofmark, Charles J. Dolan. 

Precinct 8. Warden, Charles A. Flagg; Clerk, Leo Caproni; In- 
spectors, Selwyn P. Drown, Mary Collins. 



64 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



The balloting was started at 2 P. M. The ballot boxes registered 
correctly and the checks on the voting lists were the same as the votes 
cast Polls closed at 9 P. M. 

The cast in Precinct 1, 79: Precinct 2, 101; Precinct 3, 139; Pre- 
cinct 4, 132; Precinct 5, 124; Precinct 6, 175; Precinct 8, 161; Total, 
1079. 

Question. Shall the report of the Committee appointed under Ar- 
ticle 48 of the annual town meeting of 1929 to investigate the taking 
of Black Will's Cliff for public park purposes viz: — That the Selectmen 
and Park Commissioners be instructed to prepare a bill for the taking 
of this land by the Commonwealth, to be added to the Metropolitan 
Park System, and present said bill to the Legislature, be accepted and 
its recommendation adopted? 

Precincts 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Tot. 

Yes 9 17 30 31 48 60 25 44 264 

No 70 84 109 101 76 111 143 117 811 

Blanks 00000400 4 



Dissolve at 9:25 P. M. 
Attest: 



RALPH D. MERRITT, 

Town Clerk. 



COMMITTEES NAMED 

May 22, 1929. 

John R. Hurlburt, Moderator, appointed on this date, Charles S. 
Doughty, 41 Roy street. Precinct 1, and Florence Preston, 38 Outlook 
road, Precinct 5, to serve on the Fourth of July Committee. They to 
take the places on said committee caused by the resignation of Ralph J. 
Curtis, Precinct 1, and Charles E. Hodgdon, Precinct 5. 
Attest: 

RALPH D. MERRITT, 

Town Clerk. 
September 16, 1929. 
John R. Hurlburt, Moderator, appointed Dr Leroy S. Austin, 93 
Pine street, Precinct 3, a member of the Finance Committee to fill the 
vacancy caused by the resignation of Chester A. Brown. 
Attest: 

RALPH D. MERRITT, 

Town Clerk. 



ZONING BY-LAWS APPROVED 

June 6, 1929. 

Notice received on above date that the amendment to the Zoning 
By-Laws adopted by the town of Swampscott, on March 25, 1929, were 
approved by the Attorney General on June 4, 1929. 
Attest: 

RALPH D. MERRITT, 

Town Clerk. 



1929] 



RECORDS OF TOWN CLERK 



65 



Town Clerk's Statistics 



Births Recorded— 218 

Males, 114; Females, 104. 

In January, 22; February, 10; March, 26; April, 20; May, 20; June, 
16; July, 22; August, 15; September, 15; October, 15; November, 9; 
December, 19. 

Marriages Recorded — 110 

In January, 5; February, 7; March, 3; April, 7; May, 6; June, 15; 
July, 8; August, 12; September, 15; October, 21; November, 9; De- 
cember, 2. 

Deaths Recorded— 121 

Males, 57; Females, 64. 

In January, 12; February, 15; March, 14; April, 8; May, 10; June, 4; 
July, 10; August, 6; September, 12; October, 7; November, 6; Decem- 
ber, 17. 

«. 

Dogs Licensed — 489 

Males, 416; Females, 73. 

Money paid to County Treasurer. 

Lobster Fishermen's Licenses 

Resident, 16 at $5.00. 

Resident Citizen's Sporting Licenses 

Resident, 132 at $2.25. Alien, 1 at $15.25. 

Trapping Licenses 

Resident, 2 at $2.25. 

Money paid to the Commissioner of Fisheries and Game. 



3 Auctioneer Licenses at $2.00 $6.00 

3 Pool Tables - at 2.00 6.00 

2 Bowling Alley - at 2.00 4.00 

3 Junk Dealers - at 75.00 225.00 



Paid Town Treasurer $241.00 
Attest: 



RALPH D. MERRITT, 
Town Clerk. 



66 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Department of Corporations and Taxation 

DIVISION OF ACCOUNTS 

STATE HOUSE, BOSTON 

February 21, 1929. 
To the Board of Selectmen, Mr. Howard K. Glidden, Chairman, Swamp- 
scott, Massachusetts. 

Gentlemen: I submit herewith my report of an audit of the ac- 
counts of the town of Swampscott for the period from July 1 to De- 
cember 31, 1928, made in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 44 
of the General Laws. This report is in the form of a report made to 
me by Mr. Edward H. Fenton, Chief Accountant of this Division. 

Very truly yours, 

THEODORE N. WADDELL, 
Director of Accounts. 

Mr. Theodore N. Waddell, Director of Accounts, Department of Cor- 
porations and Taxation, State House, Boston. 

Sir: — As directed by you, I have made an audit of the books and 
accounts of the town of Swampscott for the period from July 1 to De- 
cember 31, 1928, and submit the following report thereon: 

The books and accounts in the town accountant's office were ex- 
amined and checked. The recorded receipts were checked with the 
financial records of the several departments collecting money for the 
town and with the treasurer's books. The recorded payments were 
checked with the selectmen's warrants authorizing payments and with 
the treasurer's cash book. 

An analysis of the ledger was made, the appropriation accounts were 
compared with the classification book, and a balance sheet, which is 
appended to this report, was prepared showing the financial condition 
of the town as of December 31, 1928. 

The paymeiits of debt and interest were verified by a comparison 
with the cancelled bonds, notes, and coupons on file. 

The books and accounts of the town treasurer were examined and 
checked. The footings of the cash book were proved, the reported re- 
ceipts were compared with the accountant's ledger and with the records 
of the departments making payments to the treasurer, while the pay- 
ments were compared with the selectmen's warrants authorizing the 
disbursement of town funds. 

The cash balance was verified as of January 1, 1929, and the bank 
balances were reconciled with the bank statements. 

The securities and savings bank books representing the investment 
of the trust and investment funds were personally examined and checked 
in detail. 

The books and accounts of the town collector were examined and 
checked, the commitment of taxes and assessments being verified and 
the abatements checked to the assessors' records of abatements granted. 
The payments to the treasurer were checked to the treasurer's books, 
and the outstanding accounts were listed and reconciled with the ac- 
countant's ledger. 

The outstanding water accounts were listed and reconciled with 
the accountant's ledger, and the commitments of the water department 
charges were proved in detail. Several errors were found in the addition 
of the commitments, and it is therefore recommended that greater care 
be taken in adding them. The outstanding taxes and water accounts 



1929] 



DIVISION OF ACCOUNTS 



67 



were further verified by mailing notices to a number of persons whose 
names appeared on the books as owing money to the town, the replies 
received thereto indicating that the outstanding accounts are correct 
as listed. 

The deeds representing the tax titles taken by the town for taxes 
were examined, listed, and proved to the accountant's ledger. 

It is recommended that action be taken by the town treasurer 
toward foreclosure of all rights of redemption of tax titles held by the 
town, as required by Section 50, Chapter 60, General Laws, as amended 
by Section 2, Chapter 126, Acts of 1927. Any land of low value may 
be disposed of by complying with Sections 79 and 80, Chapter 60, Gen- 
eral Laws, as amended. 

The town clerk's records of dog and of sporting licenses issued were 
examined, and the payments to the county and the State, respectively, 
were verified by receipts on file. 

The records of receipts from the sealer of weights and measures, 
rent of town hall, library fines, and for licenses issued by the selectmen 
and the Health Department were examined, as well as the commitments 
of the health, highway, board of public welfare, school and cemetery 
departments. The reported payments to the treasurer were checked to 
the treasurer's and the accountant's books, and the outstanding accounts 
were listed. 

In addition to the balance sheet there are appended to this report 
tables showing a reconciliation of the treasurer's cash and summaries 
of the tax, assessment and water accounts receivable accounts, together 
with tables showing the transactions of the trust and investment funds. 

While engaged in making the audit I received the co-operation of 
the various department officials, and I wish, on behalf of my assistants 
and for myself, to express appreciation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDW. H. FENTON, 

Chief Accountant. 



RECONCILIATION OF TREASURER'S CASH 

$1,064,949.22 



Balance July 1, 1928 $48,372.14 
Receipts July 1 to December 31, 1928 1,016,577.08 



Payments July 1 to December 31, 1928 $948,498.67 
Balance December 31, 1928 116,450.55 

$1.064,949.22 

Balance December 31, 1928, per cash book $116,450.55 

Balance December 31, 1928: 

Webster and Atlas National Bank $5,20^7 
Manufacturers' National Bank 6,453.34 

Central National Bank 11,134.25 
Security Trust Company 8,057.76 

Sagamore Trust Company 85,598.83 

$116,450.55 



Webster and Atlas National Bank, Boston 

Balance December 31, 1928, per statement $5,206.37 

Balance December 31, 1928, per check register $5,206.37 

Manufacturers* National Bank, Lynn 

Balance December 31, 1928, per statement $6,453.34 

Balance December 31, 1928, per check register $6,453.34 



68 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



Central National Bank, Lynn 

Balance December 31, 1928, per statement $16,522.66 
Balance December 31, 1928, per check register $11,134.25 
Outstanding checks December 31, 1928, per list 5,388.41 

$16,522.66 



Security Trust Company, Lynn 

Balance December 31, 1928, per statement $9,516.26 
Balance December 31, 1928, per check register $8,057.76 
Outstanding checks December 31, 1928, per list 1,458.50 

$9,516.26 



Sagamore Trust Company, Lynn 

Balance December 31, 1928, per statement $93,858.23 
Balance December 31, 1928, per check register $85,598.83 
Outstanding checks December 31, 1928, per list 8,259.40 

$93,858.23 



RECONCILIATION OF TOWN COLLECTOR'S CASH 



Balance per cash books, January 7, 1929: 



Taxes 1928 


$411.47 


Moth 1928 


.50 


Interest on taxes 1928 


3.92 


Water rates 1927 


5.00 


Water rates 1928 


27.94 


Cemetery 


240.00 


Gasoline permits 


2.50 


Collector's fees 


27.00 


Petty cash advance 


10.00 



$728.33 

Cash over 23.77 



Balance Sagamore Trust Company 

January 7, 1929, per statement $750.07 
Less outstanding check 7.97 



$742.10 



Cash in office January 7, 1929, (verified) 10.00 



Taxes— 1926 

Outstanding July 1, 1928 $467.95 

Adjustment 4.50 

Payments to treasurer July 1 to December 31, 

1928 $446.65 

Abatements July 1 to December 31, 1928 25.80 



$752.10 



$752.10 



$472.45 
$472.45 



Taxes — 1927 

Outstanding July 1, 1928 $37,444.39 
Tax title on moth assessments credited to 
taxes 4.50 



$37,448.89 



1929] 



DIVISION OF ACCOUNTS 



69 



Payments to treasurer July 1 to December 31, 

1928 ■ $33,193.03 

Abatements July 1 to December 31, 1928 15074 

Tax titles 1,928.93 

Taxes 1927 credited to taxes 1928 by error 200.00 

Outstanding December 31, 1928 1,976.19 

$37,448.89 

Outstanding January 1, 1929 $1,976.19 

Payments to treasurer January 1 to 7, 1929 $81.90 

Outstanding January 7, 1929, per list 1,894.29 



$1,976.19 



Taxes— 1928 

Outstanding July 1, 1928 $3,036.00 

Commitment per warrant (property) 548,143.35 

Additional commitment per warrants 318.16 

Moth 1928 credited to taxes 1928 1.25 

Taxes 1927 credited to taxes 1928 200.00 

Overpayments 14.08 

Payment and abatement, refunded 151.76 



Payments to treasurer July 1 to December 31, 

1928 $465,944.51 

Abatements July 1 to December 31, 1928 1,979.40 

Outstanding December 31, 1928 83,940.69 



$551,864.60 



$551,864.60 



Outstanding January 1, 1929 $83,940.69 

Payments to treasurer January 1 to 7, 1929 $2,516.02 

Abatements January 1 to 7, 1929 21.12 

Outstanding January 7, 1929, per list 80,992.08 

Cash on hand January 7, 1929 (yerified) 411.47 



$83,940.69 



Moth Assessments — 1926 

Outstanding July 1, 1928 

Payments to treasurer July 1 to December 31, 1928 



$ 


.25 


$ 


.25 



Moth Assessments — 1927 

Outstanding July 1, 1928 $144.50 
Paj^ments to treasurer July 1 to December 31, 

1928 $134.75 

Abatements July 1 to December 31, 1928 1.50 

Tax title .50 
Tax title on moth assessments credited to 

taxes 1927 4.50 

Outstanding December 31, 1928 3.25 



$144.50 



Outstanding January 1, 1929 $3.25 

Outstanding January 7, 1929, per list $3.25 

Moth Assessments — 1928 

Commitment $2,509.50 
Payments to treasurer July 1 to December 31, 

1928 $2,192.50 

Abatements July 1 to December 31, 1928 2.00 

Moth 1928 credited to taxes 1928 1.25 

Outstanding December 31, 1928 313.75 



$2,509.50 



70 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



Outstanding January 1, 1929 
Payments to treasurer January 1 to 7, 1929 
Outstanding January 7, 1929, per list 
Cash on hand January 7, 1929 (verified) 



$34.25 
279.00 
.50 



$313.75 



$313.75 



Unapportioned Sewer Assessments 

Outstanding July 1, 1928 $207.72 

Commitment 4,660.09 

Apportioned and paid 12.50 

Payments to treasurer July 1 to December 31, 

1928 $3,424.38 

Apportioned July 1 to December 31, 1928 430.99 

Added to taxes 1928 220.22 

Outstanding December 31, 1928 804.72 

Outstanding January 1, 1929 
Outstanding January 7, 1929, per list 



$4,880.31 



$4,880.31 

$804.72 
$804.72 



Sewer Assessments — 1927 

Outstanding July 1, 1928 

Payments to treasurer July 1 to December 31, 1928 



$414.74 
$414.74 



Sewer Assessments — 1928 

Commitment 
Additional commitment 

Payments to treasurer July 1 to December 31, 
1928 

Outstanding December 31, 1928 

Outstanding January 1, 1929 
Outstanding January 7, 1929, per list 



$636.68 
20.92 



$422.14 
235.46 



$657.60 
$657.60 



$235.46 
$235.46 



Unapportioned Sidewalk Assessments 
Outstanding July 1, 1928 $1,099.86 
Commitment 2,463.64 



Payments to treasurer July 1 to December 31, 

1928 $1,067.56 

Apportioned July 1 to December 31, 1928 349.07 

Added to taxes 1928 1,051.49 

Outstanding December 31, 1928 1,095.38 

Outstanding January 1, 1929 
Outstanding January 7, 1929, per list 



$3,563.50 



$3,563.50 

$1,095.38 

$1,095.38 



Sidewalk Assessments — 1927 

Outstanding July 1, 1928 

Payments to treasurer July 1 to December 31, 
1928 

Abatements July 1 to December 31, 1928 



$210.59 
88.40 



$298.9S^ 



1929] 



DIVISION OF ACCOUNTS 



71 



Sidewalk Assessments — 1928 

Commitment $1,798.82 
Additional commitment 88.63 



2,252.92 

Interest credited to tax titles by error .17 



Tax titles redeemed July 1 to December 31, 

1928 $1,632.83 

Adjustment 6.30 

On hand December 31, 1928, per list 2,085.02 



410.00 



Payments to county treasurer July 1 to De- 
cember 31, 1928 $446.40 
Fees retained by town clerk 40.60 
Cash on hand December 31, 1928 13.00 



Payments to Department of Conservation $140.20 
Fees retained by town clerk 17.55 



$1,887.45 



Payments to treasurer July 1 to December 31, 

1928 $990.45 

Abatements July 1 to December 31, 1928 178.82 

Error in reporting commitment 15.61 

Outstanding December 31, 1928 702.57 

$1,887.45 

Outstanding January 1, 1929 $702.57 

Outstanding January 7, 1929, per list $702.57 

Tax Titles 

On hand July 1, 1928 $1,471.06 

Transferred from taxes and assessments: 
Levy of 1927: 

Taxes $1,924.43 

Moth assessments 5.00 

Costs and interest 323.49 



$3,724.15 



$3.724.15 

Tax Title Possessions 

Outstanding July 1, 1928 $255.35 

Outstanding December 31, 1928, per list $255.35 

Dog Licenses 

Cash on hand July 1, 1928 $90.00 
Licenses issued July 1 to December 31, 1928: 

Males 140 @ $2.00 $280.00 

Females 26 @ 5.00 130.00 



$500.00 



$500.00 



Cash on hand January 1, 1929 $13.00 
Cash on hand January 18, 1929, (verified) $13.00 

Sporting Licenses 

Licenses issued July 1 to December 31, 1928: 

Resident citizens' sporting 67 @ $2.25 $150.75» 

Resident citizens' trapping 2 @ 2.25 4.50 

Resident citizens' lobster 1 @ 2.00 2.00 

Duplicate license 1 @ .50 .50 



$157.75 
$157.75 



72 TOWN DOCUMENTS [Dec. 31 



Licenses issued January 1 to 18, 1929: 

Resident citizens' sporting 21 @ $2.25 $47.25 

Alien sporting 1 @ 15.25 15.25 



$62.50 

Cash on hand January 18, 1929 (verified) $62.50 

Selectmen's Licenses 

Outstanding July 1, 1928 $21.00 
Licenses issued July 1 to December 31, 1928 132.50 

$153.50 
$153.50 



Payments to treasurer July 1 to December 31, 

1928 $138.50 
Licenses revoked July 1 to December 31, 1928 15.00 



Town Hall Rents 

Cash on hand July 1, 1928 $10.00 
Rental July 1 to December 31, 1928 57.00 



Payments to treasurer July 1, 1928, to De- 
cember 31, 1928 $62.00 
Cash on hand December 31, 1928 5.00 



Police Department 

Cash on hand July 1, 1928 $6.30 
Receipts 1.00 



Payments to treasurer July 1 to December 31, 

1928 $7.15 
Cash on hand December 31, 1928 (verified) .15 



Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Cash on hand July 1, 1928 $53.14 

Outstanding July 1, 1928 4.89 

Charges July 1 to December 31, 1928 15.89 



Payments to treasurer July 1 to December 31, 

1928 $73.83 
Overpayment to treasurer 1927 .09 



Health Department Licenses 



Licenses issued July 1 to December 


31, 1928: 




Milk 


26 


@ $ .50 


$13.00 


Ice cream 


3 


@ 1.00 


3.00 


Garbage 


2 


@ 2.00 


4.00 


Manicure 


7 


@ 1.00 


7.00 


Alcohol 


21 


@ 1.00 


21.00 


Sale of ribbons 


16 


@ .20 


3.20 



Payments to treasurer July 1 to December 31, 

1928 $50.70 
Cash on hand December 31, 1928 .50 



$67.00 
$67.00 



$7.30 



$7.30 



$73.92 
$73.92 



$51.20 
$51.20 



Cash on hand January 1, 1929 

Payments to treasurer January 1 to 7, 1929 



$ .50 
$ .50 



1929] DIVISION OF ACCOUNTS 73 



Building Inspector 

Cash on hand July 1, 1928: 

Building permits $3.00 
Elevator licenses 2.50 



Charges July 1 to December 31, 1928: 
Building permits $182.00 
Elevator licenses 12.00 



Payments to treasurer July 1 to December 31, 
1928: 

Building permits ^ $143.00 

Elevator licenses 14.50 



$5.50 



194.00 



$157.50 

Cash on hand December 31, 1928 42.00 



Cash on hand January 1, 1929 $42.00 
Charges January 1 to February 2, 1929: 
Building permits 24.00 



Payments to treasurer January 1 to February 

2, 1929 $42.00 
Cash on hand February 2, 1929 (verified) 24.00 



Library Department 

Cash on hand January 1, 1928 $104.15 

Fines 347.61 

Sale of paper, etc. 12.80 



Payments to treasurer 1928 $415.00 
Cash on hand December 31, 1928 49.56 



Cash on hand January 1, 1929 $49.56 
Fines 31.35 



Payments to treasurer January 1 to 31, 1929 - $46.00 
Cash on hand January 31, 1929 (verified) 34.91 



Park Department — Fish House Receipts 

Cash on hand July 1, 1928 $36.10 
Outstanding July 1, 1928 91.50 
Charges July 1 to December 31, 1928 182.40 



Payments to treasurer July 1 to December 31, 

1928 $111.90 

Outstanding December 31, 1928 153.70 

Cash on hand December 31, 1928 44.40 



Cash on hand January 1, 1929 $44.40 

Outstanding January 1, 1929 153.70 
Overpayments to treasurer .20 

Payments to treasurer January 1 to 7, 1929 $44.60 

Outstanding January 7, 1929, per list 153.70 



$199.50 



$199.50 



$66.00 
$66.00 



$464.56 
$464.56 



$80.91 
$80.91 



$310.00 



$310.00 



$198.30 



74 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



Departmental Accounts Receivable 

Outstanding July 1, 1928: 
Health $1,101.27 
Schools 162.50 
Public Welfare 283.48 



Commitments July 1 to December 31, 1928: 
Health $1,165.96 
Schools 162.50 
Public Welfare 1,684.71 
Highway 30.00 



$1,547.25 



3,043.17 



Payments to treasurer July 1 to December 31, 1928: 
Health $3.00 
Schools 100.00 
Highway 30.00 

$133.00 

Abatements July 1 to December 31, 1928: 
Health 347.27 

Outstanding December 31, 1928, per list: 
Health $1,916.96 
Schools 225.00 
Public Welfare 1,968.19 



4,110.15 



Water Rates— 1926 

Outstanding July 1, 1928 $10.83 
Overpayment per previous audit (adjusted) 2.79 



Payments to treasurer July 1 to December 31, 

1928 $5.50 
Abatements July 1 to December 31, 1928 8.12 



Water Rates— 1927 

Outstanding July 1, 1928 $1,223.17 
Detailed list in excess of commitment (ad- 
justed) 16.86 
Unlocated difference (adjusted) 6.21 



Payments to treasurer July 1 to December 31, 

1928 " $1,150.47 

Abatements July 1 to December 31, 1928 76.22 

Outstanding December 31, 1928 19.55 



Water Rates— 1928 

Outstanding July 1, 1928 $9,008.50 

Commitment 24,368.12 
Water services credited as water rates 1928 48.00 



$4,590.42 



$13.62 
$13.62 



$1,246.24 



$1,246.24 



Outstanding January 1, 1929 $19.55 

Payments to treasurer January 1 to 7, 1929 $3.57 
Outstanding January 7, 1929, per list 10.98 
Cash on hand January 7, 1929 5.00 



$19.55 



$33,424.62 



1929] 



DIVISION OF ACCOUNTS 



75 



Payments to treasurer July 1 to December 31, 

1928 $23,302.34 

Abatements July 1 to December 31, 1928 * 48.50 

Commitment in excess of detail list 55.32 

Outstanding December 31, 1928 10,018.46 



Outstanding January 1, 1929 $10,018.46 
Unlocated difference 7.31 



Payments to treasurer January 1 to 7, 1929 $129.48 
Outstanding January 7, 1929, per list 9,868.35 
Cash on hand January 7, 1929 27.94 



Water Services 

Balance July 1, 1928 $853.28 

Commitment 3,647.98 

Detailed list in excess of commitment .05 

Adjustment .54 



Payments to treasurer July 1 to December 31, 

1928 $3,097.93 

Abatements July 1 to December 31, 1928 49.06 

Services credited as water rates 1928 48.00 

Outstanding December 31, 1928 1,306.86 



Water Rents 

Outstanding July 1, 1928 $20.00 
Commitment 280.00 



Payments to treasurer July 1 to December 31, 

1928 $240.00 

Abatements July 1 to December 31, 1928 20.00 

Outstanding December 31, 1928 40.00 



Payments to treasurer July 1 to December 31, 

1928 $467.17 
Outstanding December 31, 1928 309.64 



$33.424.62 
$10,025.77 
$10.025.77 



$4,501.85 



$4,501.85 



Outstanding January 1, 1929 $1,306.86 
Payments to treasurer January 1 to 7, 1929 $4.90 
Outstanding January 7, 1929, per list 1,301.96 



$1.306.86 



$300.00 



$300.00 

Outstanding January 1, 1929 $40.00 
Payments to treasurer January 1 to 7, 1929 $40.00 

Water Interest 

Outstanding July 1, 1928 $480.74 
Commitment 296.07 



$776.81 
$776.81 



Outstanding January 1, 1929 $309.64 
Payments to treasurer January 1 to 7, 1929 $32.01 
Outstanding January 7, 1929, per list 277.63 

$309.64 



76 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



Water Miscellaneous 

Commitment 

Payments to treasurer July 1 to December 31, 1928 



$5,489.75 
$5,489.75 



Cemetery Department 

Cash on hand July 1, 1928 $234.00 

Commitment 246.50 

Sale of lots 2,574.00 

Payments to treasurer July 1 to December 31, 

1928 $2,989.50 

Outstanding December 31, 1928, per list 65.00 



$3,054.50 
$3,054.50 



JOANNA MORSE LIBRARY FUND 





Savings Bank 
Deposits 


Total 


On hand at beginning of year 1928 
On hand at end of year 1928 


$5,196.00 
$5,196.00 


$5,196.00 
$5,196.00 


Receipts 


Payments 




Income $263.03 


Transferred to town 


$263.03 


ELLEN R. WHITTLE LIBRARY FUND 


On hand at beginning of year 1928 
On hand at end of year 1928 


Savings Bank 
Deposits 
$2,000.00 
$2,000.00 


Total 
$2,000.00 
$2,000.00 


Receipts 


Payments 




Income $101.25 


Transferred to town 


$101.25 


MARY L. THOMSON LIBRARY FUND 


On hand at beginning of year 1928 
On hand at end of year 1928 


Savings Bank 
Deposits 
$1,000.00 
$1,000.00 


Total 
$1,000.00 
$1,000.00 


Receipts 


Pa3^ments 




Income $50.63 


Transferred to town 


$50.63 


PHILLIPS SCHOOL MEDAL FUND 




Savings Bank 
Deposits 


Total 


On hand at beginning of year 1928 
On hand at end of year 1928 


$2,219.21 
$2,291.37 


$2,219.21 
$2,291.37 


-JReceipts 


Payments 




Income $112.28 


Deposited in savings 
bank 

Transferred to town 


$72.16 
40.12 


$112.28 




$112.28 



1929] DIVISION OF ACCOUNTS 77 



MUNICIPAL INSURANCE FUND 





Savings Bank 
Deposits 


Total 


On hand at beginning of year 1928 
On hand at end of year 1928 


$5,759.17 
$6,035.45 


$5,759.17 
$6,035.45 


Receipts 


Payments 




Income $276.28 


Deposited in savings 
bank 


$276.28 


CEMETERY INVESTMENT CARE FUND 




Savings Bank 
Deposits 


Total 


On hand at beginning of year 1928 
On hand at end of year 1928 


$10,242.26 
$16,393.27 


$10,242.26 
$16,393.27 


Receipts 


Payments 




Income $505.01 
Bequests 1,300.00 
Sale of lots 4,346.00 


Deposited in savings 
bank 


$6,151.01 


$6,151.01 




$6,151.01 



78 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



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DIVISION OF ACCOUNTS 



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1929] 



DIVISION OF ACCOUNTS 



81 



THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Department of Corporations and Taxation 

DIVISION OF ACCOUNTS 

STATE HOUSE, BOSTON 

August 14, 1929. 

To the Board of Selectmen, Mr. Howard K. Glidden, Chairman, 
Swampscott, Massachusetts. 

Gentlemen: — I submit herewith my report of an audit of the ac- 
counts of the town of Swampscott for the period from January 1 to 
June 30, 1929, made in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 44 of 
the General Laws. This report is in the form of a report made to me 
by Mr. Edward H. Fenton, Chief Accountant of this Division. 

Very truly yours, 

THEODORE N. WADDELL, 

Director of Accounts. 

Mr. Theodore N. Waddell, Director of Accounts, Department of Cor- 
porations and Taxation, State House, Boston. 

Sir: — As directed by you, I have made an audit of the books and 
accounts of the town of Swampscott for the period from January 1 to 
June 30, 1929, and submit the following report thereon: 

The books and accounts in the town accountant's office were ex- 
amined and checked. The receipts, as recorded on the books, were 
checked with the records of the several departments collecting money 
for the town and with the treasurer's books. The recorded payments 
were checked to the selectmen's warrants authorizing such payments 
and with the treasurer's cash book. The accountant's ledger was 
analyzed, the appropriation accounts being checked to the town meet- 
ing records of appropriations made and also with the classification 
book. A balance sheet showing the financial condition of the town on 
June 30, 1929, was prepared and is appended to this report. 

The books and accounts of the town treasurer were examined and 
checked, and the footings of the cash book were proved. The recorded 
receipts were analyzed and compared with the accountant's ledger and 
with the records of the departments making payments to the treasurer. 
The payments were compared with the selectmen's warrants authorizing 
the treasurer to disburse town funds. 

The cash balance was verified, the cash in the office being counted 
and the bank balances being reconciled with the statements furnished 
by the various banks of deposit. 

The collector's books and accounts were examined and checked. 
The commitments of taxes and assessments were verified, and the re- 
corded abatements were checked with the assessors' records of abate- 
ments granted. The payments to the treasurer were checked with the 
treasurer's books and the accountant's ledger, and the outstanding ac- 
counts were listed and reconciled with the controlling accounts in the 
accountant's ledger. 

The commitments of the water accounts were examined and 
checked. The recorded abatements were checked to the records in the 
water department, the payments to the treasurer were checked to the 
treasurer's books and the accountant's ledger, and the outstanding ac- 
counts were listed and reconciled. The outstanding taxes and water 
accounts were further verified by mailing notices to a number of persons 
whose names appeared on the books as owing money to the town, the 
replies received thereto indicating that the accounts as listed are correct. 



82 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



The records of sporting and dog licenses issued by the town clerk 
were examined, and the recorded payments to the State and the county, 
respectively, were verified with the receipts on file. 

The records of the sealer of weights and measures, of town hall 
rentals, of the library and cemetery departments, and of licenses issued 
by the selectmen and the health department, as well as the accounts of 
t^e highway, health, public welfare and school departments, were ex- 
amined. The reported payments to the treasurer were checked to the 
treasurer's books and the outstanding accounts were listed and checked 
to the accountant's ledger. 

Tables are appended to this report showing a reconciliation of the 
treasurer's cash and summaries of the taxes, assessments and depart- 
mental accounts receivable. 

While engaged in making the audit I received the co-operation of 
the various department ofificials and I wish, on behalf of my assistants 
and for myself, to express appreciation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDW. H. FENTON, 
Chief Accountant. 



RECONCILIATION OF TREASURER'S CASH 



Balance January 1, 1929 $116,450.55 
Receipts January 1 to June 30, 1929 337,910.59 



Payments January 1 to June 30, 1929 $386,414.25 
Balance June 30, 1929 67,946.89 



Balance July 1, 1929 $67,946.89 
Receipts July 1 to 12, 1929 14,920.81 



Payments July 1 to 12, 1929 $43,841.13 

Balance July 12, 1929: 

Cash in office (verified) $7,489.31 

Security Trust Company 13,652.59 

Manufacturers' National Bank 923.15 

Sagamore Trust Company 16,933.33 

Central National Bank 28.19 

39,026.57 



$454,361.14 
$454,361.14 

$82,867.70 



$82,867.70 

Security Trust Company of L3mn 

Balance July 12, 1929, per statement $14,437.79 
Balance July 12, 1929, per check register $13,652.59 
Outstanding checks July 12, 1929, per list 785.20 



$14,437.79 



Manufacturers' National Bank of l,ynn 

Balance July 12, 1929, per statement $947.71 
Balance July 12, 1929, per check register $923.15 
Outstanding checks July 12, 1929, per list 24.56 

$947.71 



Sagamore Trust Company of Lynn 

Balance July 12, 1929, per statement $52,470.58 
Balance July 12, 1929, per check register $16,933.33 
Outstanding checks July 12, 1929, per list 35,537.25 

$52,470.58 



1929] 



DIVISION OF ACCOUNTS 



83 



Central National Bank of Lynn 

Balance July 12, 1929, per statement $28.19 
Balance July 12, 1929, per check register $28.19 



RECONCILIATION OF TOWN COLLECTOR'S CASH 

Balance per cash book July 12, 1929: 

Cemetery accounts receivable $3.00 
Petty cash advance 10.00 



$13.00 

Cash over $4.36 



Balance Sagamore Trust Company 
July 12, 1929, per state- 
ment $4,422.67 

Deposit July 12, 1929 

(verified) 555.61 



$4,978.28 

Less outstanding check 4,977.42 



$ .86 

Cash in office July 12, 1929 (verified) 16.50 



Taxes— 1928 

Outstanding January 1, 1929 $83,940.69 

Moth assessments 1928 reported as taxes 1.50 

Error in reporting abatements 30.60 

Abatement after payment (refunded) 30.60 



Payments to treasurer January 1 to June 30, 

1929 $55,001.04 
Abatements January 1 to June 30, 1929 401.86 
Outstanding June 30, 1929 28,600.49 



$17.36 



$17.36 



Taxes— 1927 

Outstanding January 1, 1929 $1,976.19 
Payments to treasurer January 1 to June 30, 

1929 $511.18 
Abatements January 1 to June 30, 1929 , 76.54 

Outstanding June 30, 1929 1,388.47 



$1,976.19 

Outstanding July 1, 1929 $1,388.47 
Payments to treasurer July 1 to 12, 1929 $5.00 
Outstanding July 12, 1929, per list " 1,383.47 



$1.388.47 



$84,003.39 



$84,003.39 



Outstanding July 1, 1929 $28,600.49 
Payments to treasurer July 1 to 12, 1929 $3,760.74 
Taxes reported as moth assessments 1928 1.00 
Outstanding Julv 12, 1929, per list 24,838.75 

$28,600.49 



Poll Taxes — 1929 

Commitment per warrant $6,108.00 
Payments to treasurer January 1 to June 30, 

1929 $620.00 

Abatements January 1 to June 30, 1929 8.00 

Outstanding June 30, 1929 5,480.00 

$6,108.00 



84 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



Outstanding July 1, 1929 

Additional commitment to July 12, 1929 

Payments to treasurer July 1 to 12, 1929 
Abatements July 1 to 12, 1929 
Outstanding July 12, 1929, per list 



$5,480.00 
20.00 

$1,164.00 
4.00 
4.332.00 



$5,500.00 



$5,500.00 



Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes — 1929 



Commitment per warrants 
Abatement after payment (refunded) 

Payments to treasurer January 1 to June 30, 
1929 

Abatements January 1 to June 30, 1929 
Outstanding June 30, 1929 

Outstanding January 1, 1929 
Abatements after payments (refunded) 

Payments to treasurer July 1 to 12, 1929 
Abatements July 1 to 12, 1929 
Outstanding July 12, 1929, per list 



$38,690.56 
225.91 



$18,671.92 
1,998.12 
18,246.43 



$18,246.43 
122.12 

$1,668.18 
188.62 
16,511.75 



$38,916.47 



$38,916.47 



$18,368.55 



$18,368.55 



Moth Assessments — 1927 

Outstanding January 1, 1929 
Outstanding June 30, 1929 

Outstanding July 1, 1929 
Outstanding July 12, 1929, per list 



$3.25 
$3.25 

$3.25 
$3.25 



Moth Assessments — 1928 

Outstanding January 1, 1929 

Payments to treasurer January 1 to June 30, 

1929 $200.75 

Moth assessments reported as taxes 1928 1.50 

Outstanding June 30, 1929 111.50 

Outstanding July 1, 1929 $111.50 

Taxes 1928 reported as moth assessments 1.00 

Payments to treasurer July 1 to 12, 1929 $9.50 

Outstanding July 12, 1929, per list 103.00 



$313.75 

$313.75 

$112.50 
$112.50 



Unapportioned Sewer Assessments 

Outstanding January 1, 1929 $804.72 
Commitment January 1 to June 30, 1929 158.84 



Payments to treasurer January 1 to June 30, 
1929 

Outstanding June 30, 1929, per list 



$357.77 
605.79 



$963.56 



$963.56 



1929] DIVISION OF ACCOUNTS 85 



Sewer Assessments — 1928 

Outstanding January 1, 1929 $235.46 
Payments to treasurer January 1 to June 30, 

1929 $109.60 
Outstanding June 30, 1929 125 86 



841.00 



Payments to county treasurer January 1 to 

June 30, 1929 $682.80 

Fees retained by town clerk 62.20 

Cash on hand June 30, 1929 109.00 



$235.46 



Outstanding July 1, 1929 $125.86 
Payments to treasurer July 1 to 12, 1929 $7.66 
Outstanding July 12, 1929, per list . 118.20 



$125.86 



Unapportioned Sidewalk Assessments 

Outstanding January 1, 1929 $1,095.38 
Payments to treasurer January 1 to June 30, 
1929 

Apportioned January 1 to June 30, 1929 382.50 
Outstanding June 30, 1929, per list 576.25 



$1,095.38 



Sidewalk Assessments — 1928 

Outstanding January 1, 1929 $702.57 
Payments to treasurer January 1 to June 30, 

1929 $370.06 

Outstanding June 30, 1929 ^ 332.51 



$702.57 



Outstanding July 1, 1929 $332.51 
Payments to treasurer July 1 to 12, 1929 $68.25 
Outstanding July 12, 1929, per list 264.26 

$332.51 



Tax Titles 

On hand January 1, 1929 - $2,085.02 
Tax titles redeemed January 1 to June 30, 

1929 $709.48 
On hand June 30, 1929 1,375.54 

$2,085.02 



On hand July 1, 1929 $1,375.54 
Tax titles redeemed July 1 to 12, 1929 $21.88 
On hand July 12, 1929, per list 1,353.66 



$1,375.54 



Tax Title Possessions 

Outstanding January 1, 1929 $255.35 
Outstanding June 30, 1929, per list $255.35 

Dog Licenses 

Cash on -hand January 1, 1929 $13.00 
Licenses issued January 1 to June 30, 1929: 

Males 303 @ $2.00 $606.00 

Females 47 (a) 5.00 235.00 



$854.00 



$854.00 



86 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



Cash on hand July 1, 1929 $109.00 

Licenses issued July 1 to 30, 1929: 

Males 43 @ $2.00 $86.00 

Females 10 @ 5.00 50.00 



136.00 



$245.00 

Cash on hand July 30, 1929 (verified) $245.00 



Sporting Licenses 

Licenses issued January 1 to June 30, 1929: 

Resident citizens' sporting 60 @ $2.25 $135.00 

Resident citizen's trapping 1 @ 2.25 . 2.25 

Alien sporting 1 @ 15.25 15.25 

Resident citizens' lobstermen 14 (S) 5.00 70.00 



Payments to Department of Conservation 

January 1 to June 30, 1929 $204.90 
Fees retained by town clerk 17.60 



Licenses issued July 1 to 30, 1929: 

Resident citizens' sporting 3 @ $2.25 $6.75 
Resident citizen's lobsterman 1 @ 5.00 5.00 



$222.50 
$222.50 



$11.75 

Cash on hand July 30, 1929 (verified) $11.75 



Selectmen's Licenses 

Licenses granted January 1 to June 30, 1929 $427.50 

Pa3mients to treasurer January 1 to June 30, 1929 $299.50 

Licenses revoked January 1 to June 30, 1929 2.00 

Licenses not issued June 30, 1929 5.00 

Cash balance June 30, 1929 121.00 



Cash balance July 1, 1929 $121.00 

Licenses not issued July 1, 1929 5.00 

Licenses granted July 1 to 12, 1929 7.50 

Duplicate payment 4.00 

Payments to treasurer July 1 to 12, 1929 $132.50 

Licenses not issued July 12, 1929 5.00 



$427.50 



$137.50 
$137.50 



Town Hall Rentals 

Cash on hand January 1, 1929 $5.00 

Rentals January 1 to June 30, 1929 76.00 

Payments to treasurer January 1 to June 30, 

1929 61.00 

Outstanding June 30, 1929 5.00 

Cash on hand June 30, 1929 15.00 

Cash on hand July 1, 1929 $15.00 

Outstanding July 1, 1929 5.00 

Outstanding July 12, 1929 $5.00 

Cash on hand July 12, 1929 15.00 



$81.00 



$81.00 



$20.00 
$20.00 



1929] 



DIVISION OF ACCOUNTS 



87 



Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Charges January 1 to June 30, 1929 $67.83 
Overpayments to treasurer .22 



Payments to treasurer January 1 to June 30, 1929 $7.16 
Outstanding June 30, 1929 ^ 1.00 

Cash on hand June 30, 1929 59.89 



Cash on hand July 1, 1929 $59.89 
Outstanding July 1, 1929 1.00 
Charges July 1 to 30, 1929 3.03 



Payments to treasurer July 1 to 30, 1929 $62.92 
Outstanding July 30, 1929 1.00 



$68.05 
$68.05 

$63.92 
$63.92 



Building Inspector 

Cash on hand January 1, 1929 $42.00 
Building permits January 1 to June 30, 1929 158.00 



Payments to treasurer January 1 to June 30, 

1929 $161.00 
Cash on hand June 30, 1929 39.00 



Cash on hand July 1, 1929 $39.00 

Receipts July 1 to 30, 1929: 

Building permits $22.00 
Elevator licenses 16.00 



38.00 



Payments to treasurer July 1 to 30, 1929 $39.00 
Cash on hand July 30, 1929 (verified) 38.00 



$200.00 
$200.00 



$77.00 

$77.00 



Health Department Licenses 

Cash on hand January 1, 1929 
Licenses issued January 1 to June 30, 1929: 



Milk 


71 


@ 


$ .50 


$35.50 


Ice cream 


5 


@ 


1.00 


5.00 


Oleomargarine 


7 


@ 


.50 


3.50 


Non-alcoholic 










beverages 


1 


@ 


10.00 


10.00 


Alcohol 


1 


@ 


1.00 


1.00 


Manicure 


2 


@ 
@ 


1.00 


2.00 


Hairdressing 


4 


1.00 


4.00 


Garbage 


1 


@ 


2.00 


2.00 


Cesspool 


1 


@ 


2.00 


2.00 


Soap grease 


1 


@ 


2.00 


2.00 


lale of ribbons 


2 


@ 


.20 





Cash on hand July 1, 1929 

Payments to treasurer July 1 to 12, 1929 



.50 



67.00 
.40 



Payments to treasurer January 1 to June 30, 

1929 ■ $47.90 
Cash on hand June 30, 1929 20.00 



$67.90 



$67.90 

$20.00 
$20.00 



88 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



Library Department 

Cash on hand January 1, 1929 $49.56 

Receipts January 1 to June 30, 1929: 

Fines $196.20 
Sale of old paper, etc ' 4.35 



200.55 



Payments to treasurer January 1 to June 30, 

1929 $201.00 
Cash on hand June 30, 1929 49.11 



Cash on hand July 1, 1929 $49.11 

Fines July 1 to 30, 1929 26.98 

Payments to treasurer Julv 1 to 30, 1929 $36.00 

Cash on hand July 30, 1929 (verified) 40.09 



Park Department — Fish House Receipts 



Cash on hand January 1, 1929 $44.00 

Outstanding January 1, 1929 153.70 

Charges January 1 to June 30, 1929 183.70 
Overpaj'ments to treasurer .20 



Payments to treasurer January 1 to June 30, 

1929 ' $175.00 

Outstanding June 30, 1929 167.30 
Cash on hand June 30, 1929 39.70 



Cash on hand July 1, 1929 $39.70 
Outstanding July 1, 1929 167.30 



Payments to treasurer July 1 to 29, 1929 $45.10 
Outstanding July 29, 1929, per list 161.90 



Departmental Accounts Receivable 

Outstanding January 1, 1929: 

Health $1,916.96 
Public Welfare 1,968.19 
Schools 225.00 



Commitments January 1 to June 30, 1929: 

Tree Warden ' $6.50 

Health 13.46 

Highway 182.00 

Public Welfare 256.67 

Soldiers' Relief 180.00 

Schools 150.00 



$4,110.15 



788.63 



Payments to treasurer January 1 to June 30. 1929: 

Tree Warden $6.50 

Health 1,166.42 

High\vay 182.00 

Public Welfare 1,394.02 

Soldiers' Relief 180.00 

Schools 192.50 

$3,121.44 



1929] 



DIVISION OF ACCOUNTS 



89 



Abatements January 1 to June 30, 1929: 
Health $510.00 
Schools 20.00 



Outstanding June 30, 1929, per list 
Health 

Public Welfare 
Schools 



$254.00 
830.84 
162.50 



$530.00 



1.247.34 



$4,898.78 



Water Rates— 1927 

Outstanding January 1, 1929 
Payments to treasurer January 1 to June 30, 
1929 

Outstanding June 30, 1929 

Outstanding July 1, 1929 
Outstanding July 12, 1929, per list 



$16.07 
3.48 



$19.55 



$19.55 



$3.48 
$3.48 



Water Rates — 1928 

Outstanding January 1, 1929 

Payments to treasurer January 1 to June 30, 

1929 $9,724.83 

Abatements January 1 to June 30, 1929 20.58 

Water rates 1928 credited as water rates 1929 11.00 

Outstanding June 30, 1929 262.05 



Outstanding July 1, 1929 $262.05 

Unlocated difference 7.31 

Abatements July 1 to 12, 1929 $30.25 

Outstanding July 12, 1929, per list 239.11 



$10,018.46 

$10,018.46 

$269.36 
$269.36 



Water Rates— 1929 

Commitment 

Water rates 1928 credited as water rates 1929 

Payments to treasurer January 1 to June 30, 
1929 

Abatements January 1 to June 30, 1929 
Commitment in excess of detailed list 
Outstanding June 30, 1929 



Outstanding July 1, 1929 
Commitment July 1 to 12, 1929 
Unlocated difference 

Payments to treasurer July 1 to 12, 1929 
Abatements July 1 to 12, 1929 
Outstanding July 12, 1929, per list 



$42,250.64 
11.00 

$42,261.64 



$32,117.46 
87.00 
9.83 
10,047.35 



$10,047.35 
7,926.25 
.46 

$345.04 
34.00 
17,595.02 



$42,261.64 



$17,974.06 



$17,974.06 



90 TOWN DOCUMENTS [Dec. 31 

Water Services 

Outstanding January 1, 1929 $1,306.86 

Commitments January 1 to June 30, 1929 2,643.52 



Paj^ments to treasurer Januar}'- 1 to June 30, 

• 1929 $2,431.69 

Outstanding June 30, 1929 1,518.69 



Outstanding July 1, 1929 $1,518.69 
Commitment July 1 to 12, 1929 307.46 



Payments to treasurer July 1 to 12, 1929 $324.96 
Outstanding July 12, 1929, per list 1,501.19 



$3,950.38 
$3,950.38 

$1,826.15 
$1,826.15 

$240.00 

Payments to treasurer January 1 to June 30, 

1929 $240.00 

Commitment July 1 to 12, 1929 $40.00 
Payments to treasurer July 1 to 12, 1929 $40.00 

Water Interest 

Outstanding January 1, 1929 $309.64 
Commitment Januar}^ 1 to June 30, 1929 92.45 



Water Rents 

Outstanding January 1, 1929 $40.00 
Commitment January 1 to June 30, 1929 200.00 



Payments to treasurer January 1 to June 30, 

1929 $63.98 
Outstanding June 30, 1929 338.11 



Outstanding July 1, 1929 $338.11 
Commitment July 1 to 12, 1929 26.78 



Payments to treasurer Tuly 1 to 12, 1929 $5.36 
Outstanding July 12, 1929, per list 359.53 



Payments to treasurer January 1 to June 30, 

1929 $2,224.00 

Outstanding June 30, 1929 9.00 

tash on hand June 30, 1929 3.00 



Cash on hand July 1, 1929 $3.00 
Outstanding July 1, 1929 9.00 
Sale of lots July 1 to 12, 1929 265.50 



Payments to treasurer July 1 to 12, 1929 $265.50 
Outstanding July 12, 1929, per list 9.00 
Cash on hand July 12, 1929 3.00 



$402.09 
$402.09 



$364.89 
$364.89 



Water Miscellaneous 

Commitment January 1 to June 30, 1929 $30.00 
Payments to treasurer January 1 to June 30, 1929 $30.00 

Cemetery Department 

Outstanding January 1, 1929 $65.00 

Sale of lots 2,168.00 

Collection not committed 3.00 



$2,236.00 



$2,236.00 



$277.50 



$277.50 



1929] 



DIVISION OF ACCOUNTS 



91 



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92 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 









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1929] REPORT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



93 



School Committee— 1929 



John Vannevar, D.D., Chairman 

Breakers 3508-M 
Beatrice Wadleigh (Mrs.), Secretary 

Breakers 7050 

Eleanor Ingelfinger (Mrs.) 

Breakers 8790 

George C. Thomas 

Breakers 3667 

Arthur M. Wyman 

Breakers 4783-W 
Regular meeting, second Tuesday of each month 



53 Farragut Road 
154 Norfolk Avenue 
5 Cliffside Avenue 
15 Outlook Road 
2 Beach Bluff Avenue 



Superintendent of Schools 

Harold F. Dow 
62 Thomas Road Telephone Breakers 9600 

Office of Superintendent of Schools — Hadley School, Breakers 2067. 
The office of the Superintendent of Schools is open on school days 
from 8:00 A. M. to 4:00 P. M.; Saturdays from 9:00 A. M. to 12:00 M. 



School 

Winter term begins 
Winter term closes 
Spring term begins 
Spring term closes 
Summer term begins 
Summer term closes 
High School Graduation 
Fall term begins 
Fall term closes 



Calendar— 1930 

Thursday, January 2 
Friday, February 21 
Monday, March 3 
Friday, April 18 
Monday, April 28 
Thursday, June 26 
Thursday, June 26 
Tuesday, September 9 
Tuesday, December 23 



Report of the School Committee 



To the Citizens of Swampscott: 

The School Committee wishes to preface the report of the Superin- 
tendent of Schools by a brief statement of the policy governing its 
operations during the past year. 

It appears that public sentiment favors a strengthening of the 
school personnel and a higher teaching level. Such is the impression 
which has actuated your committee in its decisions and we believe, 
because of increasing public interest in this direction, there will be a 
corresponding improvement in the work accomplished by the schools. 

It follows naturally that a continuance of such a policy is dependent 
upon further public support as indicated by approval of the necessary 
expenditures. The brevity of this report will serve to emphasize the 
importance which your committee placed upon the policy of improve- 
ment to which it is committed. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN VANNEVAR, Chairman, 
ELEANOR INGELFINGER, 
GEORGE C. THOMAS, 
BEATRICE WADLEIGH, 
ARTHUR M. WYMAN, 

Swampscott School Committee. 



94 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

To the Swampscott School Committee: 

Ladies and Gentlemen: — It is my privilege herewith to submit my 
report for the year 1929, the tenth which I have had the honor to 
submit to a Swampscott School Committee. The first part of this 
report will consist of a brief review of the school year, with emphasis 
on what seem to be the more important items of that period; the second 
part will consist of recommendations for the future. 

The past year has seen an unusual number of changes in the teach- 
ing staff. The following brief tabulation indicates the teachers who 
resigned from the respective schools, and the names of those who were 
appointed to replace them. 

High School 

Resigned Teachers New to System 

Elsie Perry James H. Dunn 

Beryl Cram Mary P. Thompson 

Mona Pendergast Marion T. Childs (Mrs.) 

Edith Baldwin Hazel F. Paine 

Merle G. Hall Roscoe E. Lovell 

Junior High School 

Marie Tetzlaff Leonie M. Chandonnet 

Dorothy Record Cleora Crooker 

Helen H. Fielden Harry O. Swett 

Catherine Hurley * Mary C. Warmber 

Clarke School 

Elloine Woodward Katie Sanborn ^ 

Hadley School 

Dorothy Tower 

• Machon School 

Julia McHugh Elva Shantz 

Palmer School 

Anna Bresnahan Emma W. Parry 

Charlotte N. Conners 

Of great interest and importance in this connection is the policy 
adopted by the committee of endeavoring .to attract to the schools of 
the town teachers of superior ability. When the budget for 1929 was 
under consideration it was felt that nothing could contribute more to 
the welfare of the schools than fine teaching and, accordingly, provision 
was made in the budget for a salary schedule which would permit two 
things: first, to retain in our schools and suitably recompense those 
teachers who can truly be rated as superior, and secondly, to secure for 
such vacancies as may develop teachers who would meet the same high 
standard. The Finance Committee of the town co-operated in this 
endeavor and approved for this purpose a substantial increase in the 
amount budgeted for teachers' salaries. A definite salary schedule a 
copy of which is appended was adopted by the committee and put into 
operation in September, 1929. Sufficient time has not elapsed to state 
definitely the results of the policy outlined, but present indications are 
that in general it will gradually bring about a strengthening of our 
teaching staff. It would seem wise in this connection to point out that 
such a policy is bound to mean substantial annual increments in the 
school budget. While Swampscott teachers have not been under paid, 
our salary schedule has never been of such a nature as to attract the 
real leaders of the profession to our schools, and a definite policy and 



1929] 



REPORT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



95 



schedule calling for the employment and retention of the best material 
of the profession means that the department must be prepared to pay 
salaries commensurate with the ability it wishes to engage. 

From the administrative point of view, the establishment of the 
above policy raises this question: Just what constitutes a superior 
teacher? At the present time there are few objective standards by 
which teaching may be measured. It is largely a matter of subjective 
evidence, of opinion, and so numerous are the factors that enter into 
the forming of such an opinion that the most we can hope for is an 
approximation. It is a pleasure to state that the first attempts made 
to apply the principles laid down in the salary schedule met with the 
fullest co-operation from the principals of the various schools and was 
accepted by the teaching staff with an equally fine spirit. 

In September of the current year the committee inaugurated a new 
policy of admission to the first grades of our schools in accordance with 
the following rule adopted by the commiittee at its meeting of April 24: 
"No child who is not five years of age by January 1 shall be admitted 
at the opening of school in September, except a child who becomes five 
years of age between January 1 and March 1, whose mental age is six 
years as of September 1 of the current year, determined by an exam- 
ination given by the school psychologist under the direction of the 
School Committee and no child shall be admitted after the first six days 
of the school year who is under seven years of age except by permission 
of the Superintendent of Schools. Any person entitled to instruction in 
the Swampscott schools may be assigned by the Superintendent to 
such school and grade as his present attainments and needs warrant." 

There are several important principles involved in the above ruling, 
but primarily it is a recognition of what Thorndike and others have 
called "The First Law of Learning" — the law of readiness, which is to 
the effect that before learning can take place the organism must be 
ready for it. We have recognized this law to a certain extent in most 
of our school activities. For example, we have not attempted to teach 
the multiplication tables during a child's first year in school, nor frac- 
tions or formal grammar in the primary grades, nor calculus to Junior 
High School pupils. In recent 3'ears research and investigation have 
enabled us to generalize this and other laws of learning, and in this 
connection it has been clearl}' established that not all children of the 
same chronological age become ready for mental tasks at the same time. 
Let me quote here Dr. B. D. Buckingham, Director of the Bureau of 
Educational Research, at Ohio State University, who says: "We know 
so much more today than we used to know about the conditioning in- 
fluence of native ability. We have learned that some children are not 
ready for a given learning task as soon as others and that a few never 
become ready for any but the simplest tasks. A child who has the 
mentality of a typical child of six — that is, whose mental age is six — can 
profitably begin the first grade of an American school — unless, of 
course^ he is handicapped otherwise than mentally. He can learn to 
read as children are taught reading in that situation." Primarily, the 
policy introduced by this measure makes our entrance requirements 
more flexible than admission by chronological age, assures more homo- 
geneous grouping, and will doubtless reduce the amount of retardation. 
Furthermore it makes simpler the work of the first grade teacher and 
spares the child not ready for formal school work the chagrin of 
failure to keep up with his class-mates. Incidentally, too, this is in 
accord with the practice in many progressive school systems, Lynn, 
Beverlj^ Melrose and Winchester being among the neighboring com- 
munities to adopt this policj^ of admission to grade one. 

Another legislative act of the committee which seems worthy of 
commendation at this time is that which abolished the policy of dis- 
continuing the school sessions on stormy days. This too is in ac- 
cordance with the increasing tendency on the part of school committees 
to recognize the fact that education today and the maintenance of the 



96 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



schools is of too important a nature to be interrupted by inclement 
weather. The State requires us to maintain our Junior and Senior 
High Schools for at least one hundred and eighty days each year, and 
on this basis the cost to the town is almost a thousand dollars per day. 
Surely no other business involving such an amount would allow the 
weather to determine whether it be carried on or interrupted. It can- 
not properly be said that such a policy will prove detrimental to the 
health of the children for each parent can now determine for himself 
whether weather conditions are of such a nature as to make it unwise 
for his child to attend school. No educational loss will result because 
on very stormy days an adjustment of school work will be made in 
accordance with the children present at that time. Furthermore, the 
confusion which results from the failure of the no-school signal to be 
observed is now done away with. The schools will be open every 
scheduled day, and in time this should result in better attendance and 
better morale. 

The year 1929 has witnessed greater accomplishment along the 
lines of building and ground development than any year in the history 
of the Swampscott schools. First, this year has seen the planning and 
erection of the new Stanley School. This long-anticipated and greatly 
needed replacement of the Palmer School is a modern eight room struc- 
ture, with auditorium, so planned as to admit readily of enlargement, 
strategically located near the center of the district which it is to serve. 
The committee in charge of this project have succeeded admirably in 
their endeavor to provide a building of which our department may well 
be proud, and it is with pride and pleasure that this is added to the 
educational equipment of the town. By means of it the elementary 
school children of this part of the town will have henceforth and for 
the first time in six years adequate school housing. 

It is my happy privilege at this time to call attention to the name 
selected for this new building, the Stanley School, so called in honor 
of Miss Louise C. Stanley, the present principal of the Palmer School, 
the principal to be of the new school, a member of one of the honored 
families of the town, a greatly loved, eflPicient teacher and a woman 
with whom it is an honor to be associated. The School Department 
is fortunate to have a principal like Miss Stanley to control and direct 
the organization of this new school plant. 

Of importance hardly less than that of the erection of the Stanley 
School has been the health}' development during the past year of the 
interest in the proposed new high school. A project of such magnitude, 
involving so many questions financial and otherwise, is of necessity 
slow in its growth. The 1929 town meeting appointed a committee to 
study this matter, providing a small appropriation for its use, and con- 
siderable progress has been made along constructive lines. It is 
especially gratifying to note the increased attention which our citizens 
are giving to this problem. It is a frequent topic of conversation, com- 
ment and debate, and rightly so, for no undertaking of this department 
has ever been of greater moment to the welfare of our community. 

The committee requested and the town voted last February an 
appropriation to be expended towards the development of the Machon 
School grounds, an enterprise long overdue. This work has been 
conducted under the direction of competent landscape architects and the 
results to date are very gratifying to all those who deplored for so 
long a time the ill kempt appearance of the grounds about this fine 
building. 

During the past year we have added two new courses of study, one 
in high school English and one in elementary arithmetic. These have 
been developed by committees of teachers and principals and represent 
a great amount of careful study and efifort. Other curriculum com- 
mittees are now at work, so that a conservative policy of constant 
curriculum revision is being maintained. 



1929] 



REPORT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



97 



It seems appropriate at this time to commend to the committee, 
and through you to the citizens of the town, the extra-curricular school 
activities which have been outstanding. Among these are the publica- * 
tion of the "Swampscotta," the high school magazine; the annual exhibi- 
tions and field day of our physical training department; the concerts 
by the musical clubs of the junior and senior high schools; the pro- 
ductions of the dramatic clubs of the same two schools; and the con- 
struction of the three floats which, as Swampscott's contribution to the 
Tercentenary parade in Lynn, were planned and developed almost 
entirely by members of the school staff. 

As in former years we acknowledge the support of the Parent- 
Teacher Association, and the other organizations of the town who so 
frequently help us in our various lines of work. Especially this year 
are we indebted to the Visiting Nurse Association which generously 
supplied new scales for the Hadley and High Schools. This year, as 
indeed ever}- year, the School Department has had the fullest co-opera- 
tion and assistance from the other town departments, for which we 
express our gratitude at this time. 

Looking to the Future 

In considering the future needs of any school system, it is possible 
to go to almost any extent, so numerous are the opportunities for 
development and growth all in accordance with the accepted modern 
conception of education. The policy of our department, however, has 
been towards conservatism with emphasis on the fundamental elements 
of good teaching, proper housing and steady unspectacular achieve- 
ment. It is in accordance with this policy, then, that the following 
suggestions are offered for the consideration of the committee and the 
town. 

The situation in regard to the high school building grows steadily 
more acute. The report of the principal shows that the enrollment 
another year will necessitate an additional high school teacher, but the 
present rooms are so occupied that it is going to be exceedingly difficult 
to find space in which the new teacher can meet her classes. Our 
small industrial arts rooms are more and more crowded each year, the 
lunch facilities increasingly inadequate and in general the handicaps to 
efficient school maintenance so great that we urge once more imme- 
diate action by the town in regard to more ample high school accom- 
modations. 

Attention has been called many times to the lack of play space in 
the Hadley School grounds. When the annex was planned for ele- 
mentary school purposes it was also hoped that provision could be 
made for a gymnasium where a reasonable program of physical training 
for junior high school pupils could be maintained, but the town decreed 
otherwise. It is my earnest belief that the committee should request 
the town to provide more play-ground space about the Hadley School 
and to erect a suitable gymnasium for the use of the pupils of this 
school. Specifically, it is my recommendation that the town acquire 
the two pieces of property adjacent to the Hadley Annex on Redington 
street, the first owned by the Chick estate, containing approximately 
10,400 square feet, and the second owned by Addie F. Andrews, con- 
taining 5,800 square feet, and that a gymnasium be erected in connection 
with the Hadley School. The strongest reason that can be given for 
the additional land taking will be found in the appearance of the Hadley 
School yard at recess, where crowded conditions and brick pavements 
make what should be a recreation period a time of congestion and 
positive danger. As for the gymnasium, it is imperative if we are to 
develop in our Junior High School any worthwhile program of physical 
education. The state requires such a program and as it is maintained 
in this school during the winter months in corridors and basements, it 
is merely a compliance with the letter of the law. 



98 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



The work already done about the Machon School has made such 
an improvement that it would seem desirable to continue it another 
* j-ear. Accordingly, it is my recommendation that this department re- 
quest another appropriation to be expended on the continued develop- 
ment of the grounds around this building. 

In concluding this report may I call to your attention the splendid 
way in which all members of the staff have endeavored this year, as in 
former years, to lead, help and inspire the boys and girls of Swamp- 
scott. May I, too, express to the committee my appreciation of their 
cordial support and co-operation. 

Respectifully submitted, 

HAROLD F. DOW, 
Superintendent of Schools. 



REPORT OF HIGH SCHOOL PRINCIPAL 

To the Superintendent of Schools and the School Committee of the 
Town of Swampscott: 

Ladies and Gentlemen: — I herewith present my third annual report 
as principal of the Swampscott High School. 

In order not to exceed the space allotted to this report in the 
annual report of the town, I can refer only to the superior results 
attained by our pupils in the College Entrance Board Examinations last 
June, the favorable reports from the colleges in regard to those who 
entered last September, the rather marked probable increase in enroll- 
ment in the High School next September, and the following recom- 
mendations: 

(1) In last year's report a more complete program of physical and 
health education was recommended. The need still exists and should 
be met. 

(2) There should be an adequately equipped laboratory for biology, 
complete curricula in both mechanic and household arts, and satisfactory 
lunch room accommodations and conditions. 

(3) An additional teacher in the High School will be imperative 
in September, 1930. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LEE T. GRAY, 

Principal. 



ATTENDANCE OFFICER'S REPORT 

To the Superintendent and School Committee: 

Ladies and Gentlemen: — I herewith submit a report of my work 
as Attendance Officer for the year ending December 31, 1929. 
Visits to homes 223 
Absences due to illness 84 
Absences due to miscellaneous reasons 120 
Truants 19 
A prompt follow up of all absences reveals a large percentage of 
absences due to ignorance and lack of interest on the part of parents, 
and the inability to provide proper clothing for inclement weather. 

When parents get the school point of view they are almost always 
ready to co-operate, and only in isolated cases have I had to repeat a 
visit. The present need seems to be to arouse a consciousness in 
parents of their duty to the child and the school. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MARY K. HAMMOND, 

Attendance Officer. 



1929] REPORT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



99 



General 

School Committee 
Superintendent 



STATEMENT— DECEMBER 31, 1929 

Junior 
High 



General Elementary 

$117.42 
7,186.40 



Expenses of Instruction 

Supervisors 6,860.00 

Principals 

Teachers 

Text Books 

Supplies 

Expenses of Operation 
Janitors 
Fuel 

Miscellaneous 

Expenses of Maintenance 
Repairs, etc. 

Auxiliary Agencies 
Libraries 
Health 

Transportation 

Tuition 

Miscellaneous 



$6,340.00 
39,573.39 
1,651.07 
2,146.47 



4,757.48 
2,091.06 
1,577.34 



1,589.63 



149.31 
375.00 
1,000.00 
518.51 
793.66 



$2,840.00 
31,272.00 
903.63 
2.076.16 



1,949.93 
1,355.66 
1,168.38 



1,192.83 



100.89 
125.00 
500.00 

514.08 



High 



$4,000.00 
29,351.11 
870.09 
2,150.80 



1,935.29 
942.44 
736.23 



917.89 



88.13 



429.30 
914.95 



Outlay Expenses 
New Equipment 



1,378.73 



$15,542.55 $62,562.92 $43,998.56 $42,336.23 



Amount of appropriation 

Expended 

Balance 

Building and grounds appropriation 
Expended 



$164,446.50 
164,440.26 

$ 6.24 

$1,000.00 
833.81 

$ 166.19 



MONEY RECEIVED BY TOWN TREASURER AS RESULT 
OF SCHOOL DEPARTMENT OPERATION 

From State 

Reimbursement on account of employment 

of teachers $13,110.00 

Reimbursement for tuition payment of chil- 
dren in vocational schools 175.25 

Reimbursement for tuition payment of chil- 
dren in continuation schools 43.82 

Reimbursement for tuition of State v^ards 83.13 



From Office of Superintendent of Schools 
Tuition 

Miscellaneous receipts 



$273.75 
102.27 



$13,412.20 



376.02 



$13,788.22 



100 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



CENSUS— OCTOBER 1, 1929 

Number of boys 5 years of age or over and under 16 860 

Number of girls 5 years of age or over and under 16 883 

Total 1,743 

Number of boys 5 years of age or over and under 7 150 

Number of girls 5 years of age or over and under 7 184 

Total / 334 

Number of boys 7 years of age or over and under 14 570 

Number of girls 7 years of age or over and under 14 540 

Total 1,110 

Number of boys 14 years of age or over and under 16 140 

Number of girls 14 years of age or over and under 16 159 

Total 299 



PUPILS ENROLLED— NOVEMBER, 1929 





Sophomores Juniors 


Seniors 


P. G. 


Total 


High 




133 




108 




78 


8 


327 








Class I. 


Class II. 


Class 111. 




Junior High 








130 




128 


147 


405 




Gr. 


Gr. 


Gr. 


Gr. 


Gr. 


Gr. 


Special 






L 


II. 


in. 


IV. 


V. 


VI. 


Adv. Rtd. 




Clarke 


61 


49 


32 


33 


37 


67 




279 


Hadley 


40 


45 


43 


35 


25 


54 


12 


254 


Machon 


39 


45 


28 


34 


33 




12 


191 


Palmer 


36 


33 


27 


33 


25 


35 




189 



1,645 



SWAMPSCOTT'S SCHOOL DOLLAR— 1925-1929 





1925 


1926 


1927 


1928 


1929 


Teachers' salaries 


56. c 


57. c 


61.8c 


61. c 


61. c 


Administration and supervision 


22.3c 


20.9c 


16.7c 


16.8c 


16.6c 


Operation 


11.4c 


11. c 


11.2c 


11.2c 


10. c 


Books and supplies 


5.3c 


5.5c 


5.7c 


5.8c 


5.9c 


Repairs 


2.5c 


1.9c 


2.3c 


3. c 


2.3c 


New equipment 


0.8c 


0.8c 


0.2c 


1.2c 


0.9c 


Auxiliary agencies 


1.7c 


2.9c 


2.1c 


1. c 


3.3c 




100 c 


100 c 


100 c 


100 c 


100 c 



1929] REPORT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



101 



AGES AND GRADES— OCTOBER 1, 1929 
Grades 1 — 12 Inclusive 



Ages 


Grade 


Sex 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


Totals 




F 


1 7 

24 


56 


li 
7 


d, 
2 




-- 


-- 


— 


— 




— 


-- 


— 




— 


85 

89—174 


2 


fjr 

iVl 

F 


t 


27 


34 


Q 

O 

10 


e 
3 

3 


"2 






.... 


.... 


— 


— 


— 






93 

76—169 


3 


M 
F 


— 




9 

11 


37 
40 


1 2 
10 


4 


J 


2 


~- 


-- 




— 


— 


— 


-- 


62 

62—126 


4 


M 
F 


--- 


-- 


--- 


24 


Oo 

30 


1 1 
9 


3 


2 
2 




— 


.... 


— 








66 

68—134 


5 


IVl 

F 






— 




10 


36 


1 4 
It 

10 


e 
3 

2 


1 
1 

1 




— 


— 


— 




— 


60 

59—119 


6 


M 
F 




— 


.... 


.... 


6 


■?i 
1 

18 


00 

32 


1 
5 


X 


3 


J 








— 




95 

64—159 


7 


M 
F 


--- 


.... 








£1 

2 


14 


00 
23 


10 

8 


Q 


4 





"i" 




.... 




78 

52—130 


8 


M 
F 


— 








-- 


— 


--- 


21 
22 


20 
33 


Q 


7 


e 



4 


2 
2 




.... 


— 


56 

68—124 


9 


M 
F 


— 


— 


— 


.... 


.... 


.... 


.... 


J 

4 


25 


30 


6 


4 

6 


2 


"\ 




72 

72—144 


10 


M 
F 


— 


— 


— 


— 




.... 


.... 


— 


2 


13 

26 


25 

32 


IS 

7 


g 

4 


2 
1 


— 


64 

72—136 


11 


M 
F 




















1 

2 


10 
27 


19 

28 


8 
5 


5 

2 


1 


44 

64—108 


12 


M 
F 






















"2 


16 
21 


11 
19 


5 
3 


1 


33 

46— 79 


Opportunity 
Class 


M 
F 








2 
3 


-j 






















2 

10— 12 


Special 
Class 


M 
F 












1 


1 

1 


"i 


4 


2 
1 












8 

4— 12 


Totals 
by Age 


M 
F 


18 

24 


78 

84 


76 
52 


60 
79 


72 
66 


75 
67 


72 
60 


82 
59 


57 
72 


65 
70 


66 
72 


56 
65 


29 
28 


12 
7 


2 
1 


820 
806 


Grand Total 


42 


162 


128 


139 


138 


142 


132 


141 


129 


135 


138 


121 


57 


19 


3 


1626 



SWAMPSCOTT SALARY SCHEDULE 

On and after September 1, 1929, the minimum requirements for 
appointments in the Swampscott schools shall be as follows: 

(1) For appointment to the elementary grades: 

(a) Training of at least two years beyond the completion 

of an approved four year high school course. 

(b) Two years' teaching experience. 

(2) For appointment to the junior high school: 

(a) Training of at least three years beyond the completion 

of an approved four year high school course. 

(b) Two years' teaching experience. 

(3) For appointment to the high school: 

(a) Training of at least four years beyond the completion 

of an approved four year high school course. 

(b) Two years' teaching experience. 

The following salary schedules are provided: 

Schedule A 

(For elementary grades) 

A minimum salary of $1200.00 and a maximum of $1500.00 to be 
reached in increments of $100.00 each. 

To reward superior teaching ability and additional specific qualities 
the following definite salary levels above the automatic maximum are 
■ tf^reby established: 



102 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



Superior Teaching Level No. 1 — An increment from $1500.00 to 
$1700.00 in two annual increases of $100.00 each, open to all teachers 
whose service is of such high quality as to justify such action. 

Superior Teaching Level No. 2 — An increment from $1700.00 to 
$1800.00 open to all teachers whose service is of such high quality as 
to justify such action, and who in addition have completed the equivalent 
of three years of training beyond the completion of a four year high 
school course. 

Superior Teaching Level No. 3 — An increment above $1800.00 open 
only to those teachers whose service is of a conspicuously high order, 
and who in addition have pursued professional study beyond the re- 
quirements of the preceding level. 

Schedule B 

(For junior high school) 

A minimum salary of $1400.00 and a maximum of $1700.00 to be 
reached in increments of $100.00 each. 

To reward superior teaching ability aiid additional specific qualities 
the following definite salary levels above the automatic maximum are 
hereby established: 

Superior Teaching Level No. 1 — An increment from $1700.00 to 
$1900.00 in two annual increases of $100.00 each, open to all teachers 
whose service is of such high quality as to justify such action. 

Superior Teaching Level No. 2 — An increment from $1900.00 to 
$2000.00 open to all teachers whose service is of such high quality as 
to justify such action and who in addition have completed the equivalent 
of four years of training beyond the completion of a four year high 
school course. 

Superior Teaching Level No. 3 — An increment above $2000.00 open 
only to those teachers whose service is of a conspicuously high order, 
and who in addition have pursued professional study beyond the re- 
quirements of the preceding level. 

Schedule C 

(For high school) 

A minimum salary of $1600.00 and a maximum of $1900.00 to be 
reached in increments of $100.00 each. 

To reward superior teaching ability and additional specific qualities 
the following definite salary levels above the automatic maximum are 
hereby established: 

Superior Teaching Level No. 1 — An increment from $1900.00 to 
$2100.00 in two annual increases of $100.00 each, open to all teachers 
whose service is of such high quality as to justify such action. 

Superior Teaching Level No. 2 — An increment from $2100.00 to 
$2200.00 open to all teachers whose service is of such high quality as to 
justify such action and who in addition have completed the equivalent 
of five years of training beyond the completion of a four year high 
school course. 

Superior Teaching Level No. 3 — An increment above $2200.00 open 
only to those teachers whose service is of a conspicuously high order 
and who in addition have pursued ^professional study beyond the re- 
quirements of the preceding level. 

NOTE 1 — The requirements for appointment or advancement may 
be waived in individual cases by vote of the committee. 

NOTE 2 — All professional study offered by teachers for advance- 
ment to Superior Teaching Levels No. 2 and No. 3 must be approved 
by the Superintendent of Schools. 



1929] REPORT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



SWAMPSCOTT SCHOOL DEPARTMENT DIRECTORY 
High School 

Lee T. Gray, Principal Roscoe E. Lovell 

Maebelle Adams John L. Miller 

Elizabeth E. Blanchard Hazel F. Paine 

Marion T. Childs (Mrs.) A. Lillian Rideout 

Charles F. Cuddy Ilah Spinney 

Harriet M. Dillon Mary P. Thompson 

James H. Dunn Bertha 1. Wales (Mrs.) 

Helen M. Kelley Marjorie White 



Junior 

Alice L. Shaw, Principal 
Jean G. Allan 
Marion Burlingame 
Leonie M. Chandonnet 
Beatrice L. Cook 
S. Perry Congdon 
Edith M. Craig (Mrs.) 
Cleora Crooker 
Alice T. Durgin 
Gertrude L. Herron 



High School 

George E. Hutchinson 
Alma Matson 
Crandall P. Nodwell 
Lena Patchett (Mrs.) 
Dorothy R. Powell 
Cleora Price 
Harry O. Swett 
Mary C. Warmber 
Helen Warren 



Margaret E. Durgin 
Amy M, Fenwick 
Ruth K. James 
Marion F. Newcomb 



Hadley School 

Phyllis G. Smith 
Dorothy F. Tower 
Mabel F. Verry 
Anna F. Willey 



Clarke School 

Blanche E. Doyle, Principal Helen B. Lewis 

Edith A. Farnum Melvina G. Pearson (Mrs.) 

Mary Gandolfo Katie Sanborn 

Helen A. Hayes Katherine Wilson 

Ada S. Lewis 

Machon School 

Mary I. Perkins, Principal Elsie B. Oakes (Mrs.) 

Marion J. Champion Elva M. Shantz 

Flazel D. Chase (Mrs.) M. Elizabeth Williams 
Mabel S. Knight 

Stanley School 

Louise C. Stanley, Principal Jessie C. Martin 

Charlotte N. Conners Emma W. Parry 



Grace M. Farrell 
Alice M. Gove 

Tlora A. Boynton 
Clara B. Fowler 
Lillian Hewitt 
Esther Nazarian 



Gladys V. Brown 
Marion Clinch 
Frances M. Newell 



L. T. Holder 
Herbert E. Wood 
John F. Wilson 
Iber L. Chapman 
Simeon Strong 
Harold Wheeler 



A. Thelnia Smith (Mrs.) 

Supervisors 

Physical Training 
Art 

Penmanship 
Music 

Secretaries 

Junior High School 
High School 
Superintendent's Office 



Janitors 



High School 
Hadley School 
Hadley School 
Clarke School 
Machon School 
Stanley School 



104 TOWN DOCUMENTS [Dec. 31 



High School Committee 



At the adjourned annual town meeting of March 25, 1929, the 
following vote was passed: 

"That a committee be appointed to select a site suitable for a new 
high school building and employ an architect, if this is deemed advisable 
by the committee, to prepare plans and estimates for such a building 
and to report at a subsequent town meeting concerning such sites, the 
estimated cost thereof and a sketch or outline of said building and the 
estimated cost of erecting and equipping it. Said committee shall con- 
sist of five persons to be appointed in the following manner, namely: 
one member of the school committee to be designated by the school 
committee, and four citizens of the town to be appointed by the mod- 
erator, and that the sum of $801.09 be appropriated' by transfer from 
the Redington Street School account, to be used by the committee for 
the above mentioned purpose. Voted in the affirmative." 

Committee Personnel 

The moderator appointed the following committee: Henry S. Bald- 
win, Philip E. Bessom, H. Allen Durkee, Robert C. McKay; George 
C. Thomas, School Committee. 

At the first meeting of April 17, the committee organized with 
Henry S. Baldwin chairman and Robert C. McKay clerk. 

Harold F. Dow, Superintendent of Schools; W. W. Pratt, Town 
Engineer; the architects, Messrs. Ralph Adams Cram, senior member, 
Chester N. Godfrey, Alexander E. Hoyle and Chester A. Brown, have 
attended several meetings, by invitation, in consulting capacity. 

Transactions of Committee 

Your committee has been diligent, holding numerous meetings and 
conferences throughout the year. 

Locations of possible sites in the town have been visited by the 
committee as a whole and individually to become fully acquainted with 
their advantage or disadvantages for school purposes. 

As no funds were available for the use of the original committee 
on the needs for a high school, it was decided from the outset to be 
within the scope of the duties of the present committee to review the 
situation along the same lines as the proposed new high school. When 
the architects, Cram & Ferguson, were selected, they were requested 
to make a study of the present Phillips School and submit drawings, 
including an elevation and floor plans and to obtain bids for the work. 
This they agreed to do without extra charge to the town and the subject 
will be fully discussed in the present report. 

Study of Locations 

In considering the question of location for a high school building, 
your committee has made a survey of all plots of land in the town 
which might be considered suitable or available. This included the 
site of the Phillips High School. There are five of these locations, and 
they have been studied in parallel column. They are: 

Plan 1. Phillips School. 

Plan 2. Phillips Park. 

Plan 3. Adjacent Phillips Park. 

Plan 4. Forest Avenue. 

Plan 5. GrifiFin Lot. 



1929] REPORT OF HIGH SCHOOL COMMITTEE 105 



The advantages and disadvantages of each plan or lot were weighed. 
The factors considered were accessibility for students; the possibility 
of future extension; public appeal to persons passing through the to^yn; 
economy of maintenance, heating and ventilation; adequate parking 
space near the building; availability of an athletic field; loss of taxable 
property; cost of location and the like. 

This study resulted in the unanimous decision of the committee in 
favor of Plan No. 2, in which the school would be located about 100 
feet back and parallel to Humphrey street. Ralph Adams Cram and 
his assistants concurred on this location as best suited for a new high 
school plant. 

This land is the property of the town, and it will be necessary to 
obtain an act of Legislature to use it for school purposes. 

Much development has been done by the Park Board since it was 
purchased by the town in 1913. and very little preparation would be 
necessary either for the erection of the building or the athletic field. 

From information available, it is clear that the school could be 
built at this point for the least expenditure, and without loss of taxable 
land or buildings. The large auditorium, with seating capacity of more 
than seven hundred, would be of great value to the town, not only for 
high school purposes, but also for meetings of citizens and community 
gatherings. 

Being on a main artery, it can easily be reached hy street railway 
cars, buses or automobiles. 

Before arriving at this decision, the architects were asked to co- 
operate in the preparation of scale layout drawings of the five locations, 
which they did without extra charge to the town. These drawings 
showed not only the building in each case, but also the athletic field 
and all important details. Information regarding the value of the sev- 
eral locations and buildings thereon was obtained from the records of 
the Assessors' department. 

Specifications 

In June and July joint meetings were held with the members of 
the school committee and school superintendent to draw final specifica- 
tions of building requirements for use of the architects. The schedule 
covering the number and size of the rooms, as reported by the original 
committee, with minor changes, was unanimously adopted and sub- 
mitted as follows: 

No. of Capacity 
Rooms or size 



Gymnasium . 1 66x88 

Library 1 50 

Study halls 2 50 each 

Auditorium 1 600 to 750 

Shops 2 24 each 

Cooking and sewing 2 24 each 

Drawing: 

Mechanical 1 30 

Freehand 1 30 

Science 5 2, 30 each 

3, 24 each 

Bookkeeping 1 35 

Typewriting 2 25 each 

Shorthand 1 30 

Foreign language 3 30 each 

Mathematics 2 35 each 

Social studies (History, civics) 2 35 each 

English 4 35 each 

Others 2 35 each 

Administration 2 

Rest rooms 3 

Lunch 1 300 



106 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



The proposed high school shall accommodate from 500 to 600 
students, with provision for future additions sufficient for the normal 
increase of the population of the town. 

It was decided to recommend colonial style of architecture, with 
red brick and limestone trim, as being in keeping with the spirit and 
atmosphere of our New England community. 

It was also specified that the construction shall be fire-proof and 
in accordance with the State building regulations. 

The interior trim shall be of wood, with linoleum floor covering 
in general. 

Ample gymnasium lockers and showers for 500 to 600 students 
shall be provided. 

There shall be separate toilets for boys and girls on each floor, and 
also for rest and emergency rooms and administrative departments. 

There shall be supply rooms on each floor. 

The system of heating and ventilation is to be decided by the 
architects, with the approval of the committee. 

It was the unanimous sense of both joint sessions that the proposed 
high school shall be of the most modern and up-to-date construction 
throughout and conform to the latest educational requirements. Also, 
that every provision shall be made for comfort, hygiene and sanitation. 

Selection of Architect 

In the erection of major public buildings by far the most important 
factor is the selection of the architect. There are many other factors, 
such as location of the plant, educational problems, furniture and fittings, 
facilities for athletics and convenience of the public, all of which can 
be readily and economically worked out by a diligent committee with 
the assistance of an architect of wide experience. 

Many applications were received from well known architects and 
given careful consideration. The firm which seemed to your committee 
to combine experience, qualifications and fitness was Cram & Ferguson, 
of 248 Boylston street, Boston, Mass. Furthermore, Chester A. Brown, 
a citizen of Swampscott, is' associated with Air. Cram. This firm has a 
world-wide reputation for buildings of the most important character 
for educational and public purposes. The selection was made at the 
meeting of July 25, and since then the architects have rendered most 
valuable assistance, not only in the design and planning of the high 
school itself, but also in the study of various locations. They have also 
prepared drawings and plans showing what could be done around the 
present Phillips High School to meet the educational requirements as 
set forth in the specifications. 

Although the amount requested by the committee was reduced 
from $2,000 to $801.90, the architects agreed to the extra work involved 
in the Phillips School study and locations without charge. They also 
agreed to obtain preliminary bids on both the new school and on the 
reconstruction and addition which might be made to the Phillips school. 

All of their work has been completed in the most thorough and 
satisfactory manner and the sum of $800.00 has been paid. If the 
town decides to go ahead with this proposition, your committee strongly 
recommends that the firm of Cram & Ferguson be entrusted with the 
entire enterprise. In their acceptance of the commission, they agreed 
that any amount paid for the preliminary plans would be credited on 
the final bill. 

Description of School 

Titles of pictures: 

Front elevation of proposed high school. 
Plan of basement. 
Plan of first floor. 
Plan of second floor. 



! 



1929] 



REPORT OF HIGH SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



107 



The accompanying illustrations made from architects' drawings 
and plans, give a good idea of the form and style of the proposed new 
high school, together with the arrangement of rooms on each floor. 

The style of the architecture of the school is New England colonial, 
and in keeping with the spirit of the community. 

The school is of two stories, with basement, and is first-class, fire- 
proof construction throughout. 

The material of the walls is red brick, with, limestone ornamenta- 
tion; the lantern or bell tower and cornice are of wood. 

There are two floors above the basement, and the arrangement of 
each is shown in the accompanying drawings. 

The auditorium and the gallery give a seating capacity of between 
600 and 750, and a fully-equipped stage is provided, suitable for any 
exercises of the school or public entertainments. 

No attempt will be made to describe in detail the arrangement of 
the rooms for the various departments, but these have been made with 
the co-operation of the school committee, superintendent of schools and 
the architects with a view to providing every need of a modern educa- 
tional plant. 

Citizens are urged to study these plans, and note the excellent 
arrangement which they represent. 

The question of heating, ventilation and sanitation have been thor- 
oughly considered, and agree with the most modern practice. 

A glance at these drawings will show the impossibility of attempt- 
ing to obtain equal results by the reconstruction of the old building. 

Furniture and Equipment 

In addition to the very complete information supplied by the 
architects covering the building and location, they also furnished a 
schedule of furniture and equipment, together with unit prices on each 
item. This was submitted to Superintendent of Schools Harold F. 
Dow, who studied them carefully and submitted a digest of the in- 
formation for the assistance of the committee. Mr. Dow also sat in a 
number of meetings, in consulting capacity on this subject. 

Without going* into detail here, the results may be stated as 
follows : 

It is probable that some of the furniture in the present high school 
can be utilized to advantage. 

The. new furniture and equipment, including apparatus required for 
the various laboratories, domestic science, manual training, gymnasium, 
library and other departments, will cost approximately $30,000, and 
this amount has been included in the estimate of the cost of the school. 

Athletic Field 

It was unanimously agreed that a modern high school plant would 
not be complete without taking into account the subject of athletics. » 
One of the strongest factors in education today is the esprit de corps 
of students, based on clean, competitive athletics. A healthy body and 
a healthy mind go together to produce the best citizen for the future. 
This viewpoint is being generally adopted throughout the country and 
wherever possible an athletic field forms part of all high school build- 
ing programs. 

It was, accordingly, specified that the architects' plans shall include 
a layout of an athletic field with a one-quarter mile track, foot ball and 
base ball fields, also tennis courts and hockey rink; and that provision 
be made for bleachers so that interschool games and contests can 
be held. 

It was also specified that there should be ample parking space, to 
take care of the normal school requirements, as well as of the public 
when communit}^ meetings are held in the auditorium or on the athletic 
field. 



108 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



Phillips High School 

In carrying out the instructions of the town, to report on the loca- 
tion and cost of a new high school, your committee has reviewed the 
work of the original committee in regard to the possibility of recon- 
struction and addition to the present plant. 

As stated elsewhere, the architects have co-operated in this work 
in the preparation of plans and preliminary bids from contractors, all 
of which has been thoroughly done without expense to the town, making 
any similar work unnecessary. 

By reference to Page 225 of the Town Report of 1928, a statement 
will be found regarding the plant, which may be summarized as follows: 

The location is sightly and was given to the town without restric- 
tion. 

The original building was erected in 1893-'94, at a cost of about 
$54,000. In 1915 two wings and a gymnasium were added, with fire- 
proof stairways to the auditorium, at a cost of $61,500. 

No question is raised as to the necessity for additional facilities 
and more modern conditions. 

The committee on needs for a high school went as far into the 
problem as was possible without drawings and actual bids. Their 
findings have been confirmed by more complete information, which is 
now available. 

The location is not a good one for a public school, not only on 
account of steep approaches from the lower part of the town, but owing 
to the limited space available for educational buildings. No adequate 
or satisfactory plan of building an addition on the present land could 
be worked out, without interfering with the present building. 

In order to meet the specifications, a new plant would be necessary 
at one side, which would mean the taking of a large amount of property, 
buildings and land. Even if this were done no future additions would 
be possible, and an athletic field would be impossible. The question of 
cost of buildings on the various sites will be considered elsewhere, but 
it can be stated that the saving in money by the use of the old plant 
enlarged would amount to only a few thousand dollars and the advan- 
tages sought by the town not only for today but for the future, would 
be entirely lost, together with the destruction of six buildings and the 
loss of much taxable property. 

The question of disposition of the present plant, in the event of a 
new high school, has been considered and it is felt that the building has 
more than paid for itself in the thirty-five years of continuous service. 
The erection of a new building should, therefore, not be made dependent 
on what shall be done with the old one. 

Undoubtedly some use can be found for the present plant not 
involving its demolition. Various suggestions have been made for 
future grade school, community hospital or other public building re- 
quired by the town. 

Costs 

In estimating the cost, both of reconstruction of the Phillips School 
and the new high school, all data as to areas and assessed valuations 
were obtained from the official records of the town. The figures cover- 
ing construction are bids of reputable contractors, obtained by the 
architects, and based on drawings and specifications submitted. The 
estimate covering furniture and fittings was prepared in consultation 
with the superintendent of schools, on the basis of a schedule of prices 
obtained from the architects. The estimates as to extra excavation in 
Plans 1-3-4 are based on estimates of town engineer, W. W. Pratt. 
The architects' fee is based on the usual 6% on the cost of the general 
contract. 

Considering taking of property, the town can offer only 25% in 
excess of assessed valuation. For the purpose of this comparison, how- 
ever, the committee has used 50%. 

For the benefit and convenience of citizens in the consideration of 
this report, the following tabulation is given: 



1929] 



REPORT OF HIGH SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



109 



OOO I o 
O O O I o 

<=l<=.o io 

OOO I o 
VO vo O I O 
i vo" 



I oo o o 
I oo o o 
i o o o' o 

I o o ^ 

I O O Cvl^CVJ^ 

i tCo^aCcT 

I CO CO 0\ CM 



OOO 
OOO 

O O CM 



OOO 
00 o o 
oo^o_^ 
OiO o" 



C30 O O O O 

o o o o 
^.^^ooo 

o o o o 
t^voooio 
<\f oTvo" 



o o o o 
oo oo 
o o' o o 
o o o o 
o^o 

tCo'oo'od' 

CO CO On CM 



I o o o o 
1 o o o o 
i o o o o 

! O O CM CM 
; O O ^^^^ 
i rCo'o'o 
; CO CO CM vo 



oo 
oo 
oo 
o^o" 



o o o o 
o o o o 
o o o o 

O O CM CM 
O O^CM^^^ 
tCo"^ co" 
CO CO ^ ON 



CO <u o o o 
t>x 7; o o o 

000 

a,rCMD"o 
o 



00 :oOo 

00 I o o O 

o 06 ; o 

O CO I O <^ CO 

O^'-H I O^'^t 

o'oC ! o cm'cm" 

r-H VO I CO 00 

<^co </5-;^ Tf 



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JO rt — • 

0° 
<u 

b b > 

<u a> (U 



O <U ^ 

5f "35^=3 



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c« ho, 
be G 



2 



o o o 



3 00 tn 

OJ O o 

13 -a 

<U OJ 

c/2 cti 

s s s 



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o 

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o 

O cn 

a 

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rt ^ , 

Oj C 5j 

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<<<< w w wmw 



<-(-l 

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3 

CO O O 



110 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



In considering the different locations and the estimated cost of the 
school, it must be kept in mind that other features, from an educational, 
economic and maintenance standpoint, are equally important and in 
some cases more important. 

Taking the plans in order: 

Plan No. 1, Phillips School 

It appears that the cost of this undertaking would be within 
$11,000.00 of the cost of an entirely new plant, according to Plan No. 2. 

The advisability of continuing the use of the Phillips School has 
been covered in a separate paragraph. In the opinion of your com- 
mittee, this plan would not be advisable for the town under the circum- 
stances. 

Plan No. 2, Phillips Park 

It is estimated that the cost of a school equipped, together with an 
athletic field on Phillips Park, would cost $493,220. This is the lowest 
estimate of the four new locations considered. 

The advantages of this site have been discussed elsewhere in this 
report. 

No taxable property need be condemned, nor would there be any 
loss in taxable property, in the matter of future development if the 
park location is adopted. 

It must also be kept in mind that the park is practically ready for 
work, which could be carried on economically and without interference 
with the operation of the present school. 

Both the architects and competent engineers, who have been con- 
sulted, concur with the committee in the opinion that the building 
can be erected at this point without difficulty as to foundation. 

Plan No. 3, Adjacent to Phillips Park 

This plan was first considered by your committee early in the 3''ear, 
but since then the land has been improved and a number of dwellings 
are now being erected. To condemn these would be an expensive 
matter, as will be seen from the estimate covering the total cost. 

Under the conditions, this plan was abandoned by the committee. 

Plan 4, Forest Avenue 

This plan was seriously considered, but it appears that the cost 
will be much higher than Plan No. 2, and the location not suitably 
for a new school plant. 

This site is almost wholly ledge, and the expense of the building 
and an athletic field would be very great. 

Plan No. 5, Griffin Lot 

The land on this location is of high value, so that the total esti- 
mated cost with the building would be much higher than that for 
Plan No. 2. This is without considering an athletic field as a part 
of the plant, but depending on the use of Phillips Park. 

Your committee is of the opinion that this location would not lend 
itself to the most advantageous development from the standpoint of 
taxable property. 

Based on these considerations your committee, as stated, decided 
to recommend Plan No. 2, which with school and athletic field, it is 
estimated, will cost the town $493,220. 

Effect on Tax Rate 

Your committee has given careful consideration to the question of 
effect of a new high school building on the tax rate. From the pre- 
liminary bids and a study of the cost of furniture, fittings and location, 
it appears that the total cost of the enterprise to the town will be 
about $500,000. 



i 



1929] REPORT OF HIGH SCHOOL COMMITTEE 111 



We are informed by the Bureau of Corporations that money for 
high schools in the Comnionweahh is being borrowed by special Act 
of Legislature, for fifteen year periods, with ten per cent, of the total 
cost paid from the tax levy the first year. With a total valuation for 
the town of $22,394,762, it is necessary to raise by taxation approxi- 
mately $22,395 for every $1,000 of taxable property. On this basis 
were no other reductions or economies made, the additional tax on 
account of high school for the first year would be about $2.23 per 
thousand, or an average of $1.77 per thousand throughout the entire 
period of fifteen years. 

Under present business conditions, it is particularly desirable to 
proceed with the erection of important public buildings, and not only 
President Hoover and his committees, but all business and industrial 
agencies are urging that work be done at this time to give employment 
and thus tide the country over the critical financial period. 

Alaterials and labor are at present on a moderate basis, and your 
committee feels that the time is now right to go ahead with this project 
which means so much to the town and the education of our children. 

Another factor is the reduction in Federal income taxes, which, 
it is expected, will be in effect in 1930. It is doubtful if a more fav- 
orable opportunity will offer itself for a new high school than at the 
present time. 

Conclusions 

To sum up: 

A new high school is needed in Swampscott. 

Now is a good time to build it, and if it is located on the Phillips 
Park, the present school can be used during the period of the year 
w^hen the new building is under construction. 

The elevation and plans submitted, together with the estimate of 
costs, may be considered reliable and represent the best architectural 
and engineering advice obtainable. 

The Phillips Park location permits future additions to the school 
and an athletic field is already available without destroying the use of 
the Park for citizens. Ample parking space is also available, with little 
expense of preparation. 

To reconstruct and enlarge the Phillips School would be an 
economic mistake, showing little saving in money and not permitting 
future additions. 

No athletic field or parking space w^.ould be available, and the 
auditorium would not be convenient for public and community gath- 
erings. 

The cost and maintenance of a reconstructed plant would be ex- 
cessive owing to the greater number of exposed walls and floor area, 
with double heating plants. 

Combination of a new and old building would be a great mistake. 

Recommendations 

That the report of the High School Building Committee be ac- 
cepted and adopted. 

The the sum of $500,000 be raised by notes or bonds of the town 
to erect and equip a high school and provide and equip an athletic field. 

That the Selectmen be authorized and instructed to prepare and 
present a bill requesting the Legislature to permit the town to borrow 
the sum of $500,000 in excess of its borrowing capacity for the purpose 
of erecting and equipping a high school building and providing and 
equipping an athletic field. 

That the Selectmen be authorized and instructed to prepare and 
present a bill requesting the Legislature to give jurisdiction and control 
of Phillips Park, in Swampscott, to the High School Committee for 
school purposes. 



112 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



That a committee shall be appointed consisting of five persons in 
the following manner, namely: one member of the School Committee, 
to be designated by the School Committee; and four citizens of the 
town, to be appointed by the moderator; and that said committee be 
directed and empowered to commission Cram & Ferguson as architects 
and enter into contracts necessary for the erection of a high school on 
the Phillips Park, substantially as set forth in this report. 

HENRY S. BALDWIN, Chairman, 
PHILIP E. BESSOM, 
H. ALLEN DURKEE, 
ROBERT C. McKAY, Clerk, 
GEORGE C. THOMAS, 

The High School Committee. 



Building Inspector 



To the Board of Selectmen: 

Gentlemen: — I herewith submit the following report for the year 
ending December 31, 1929: 

Permits Estimated 





Issued 


Cost 


Dwellings: 






XT 

New 


67 


$594,400.00 


Alterations and additions 


39 


33,000.00 


Private Garages: 




New 


X\JO 


4^ Q9n no 


Alterations and additions 


10 


2,650.00 


Private storage, outbuildings, etc.: 




New 


4 


3,325.00 


Alterations and additions 


2 


2,100.00 


Business buildings: 




New 


3 


54,000.00 


Alterations and additions 


3 


4,400.00 


Town buildings: 




New (Stanley School) 


1 




(Town stable) 


1 ^ 








115,500.00 


Building permits 


233 




Permits to shingle 


123 




Total 


356 


$853,195.00 


Number inspections (buildings) 




489 


Number inspections (shingling) 




123 


Total 




612 


Amount of building fees collected 




$307.00 


Elevator operators' licenses issued: 


-No. 


Fees 


New 


13 


$13.00 


Renewals 


6 


3.00 


Totals 


19 


$16.00 



All hotels and elevators have been inspected and returns made to 
the State. Several complaints of violations of the building laws have 
been investigated, and in most cases adjustments made. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HARRY E. HARDY, 
Building Inspector. 



1929] 



REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH 

The Board of Health 



113 



To the Citizens of Swampscott: 

The Board of Health herewith submits its report for the year ending 
December 31, 1929, together with those of its various officers. 

The resignation of Mrs. Barbara M. Lewis and the appointment of 
Miss Clara L Wentworth to fill the vacancy has been the only change 
in the personnel of the department. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Stensrud took over the ash contract upon the death 
of her father, Herbert C. Brown, who ha:d held the town contracts for 
the collection of ashes and garbage or both during the past sixteen 
years. The work has been carried on in a very satisfactory manner 
under her supervision. 

The garbage collections have also been exceptionally good this 
year. 

The condition of the beaches has also been the subject of much 
favorable comment by those having occasion to visit them during the 
past summer. 

New locations for dumps to take the place of those at For«st 
avenue and Paradise road will soon have to be found. Better co- 
operation on the part of those having occasion to carry material to the 
dumps would be of great assistance in keeping the dumps in a more 
sightly condition. Considerable trouble has been experienced with 
individuals and firms of other communities who have been using the 
dumps of this town for the disposal of their waste material. In those 
cases where the individuals or persons were known they have been 
warned to discontinue the practice at once. 

By request of the Park Commissioners ashes and other waste 
material are now being dumped at Phillips Park. Dumping at Pleasant 
street has been discontinued temporarily. 

The Tuberculosis Clinic conducted in June under the auspices -of 
the State Department of Public Health, among the public and parochial 
school children, played a prominent part in the program of preventa- 
tive work this year. Oflficials in charge of the clinic made many fav- 
orable comments regarding the physical condition of children in our 
schools. The final report of the clinic will be found in the report of 
the Health Officer. 

The summer round-up and examination in June of children entering 
the public and parochial schools for the first time was instrumental in 
obtaining the correction of their defects during the summer so that they 
were in the best possible physical condition when they entered school 
in September. 

The sewer construction program of the past year has played a 
prominent part in the general improvement of sanitary conditions in the 
eastern section of the town and a similar program during the coming 
year will reduce conditions that have been menacing the health of 
citizens of that section for several years, to a minimum. 

For detailed information of the work of the department we refer 
you to the reports of our various officers. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LORING GRIMES, M.D. 
HAROLD H. BARTOL, 
JOHN B. CAHOON, 

Board of Health. 



114 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



Health Officer 



To the Board of Health: 

Gentlemen: — I herewith submit the following report for the year 
ending December 31, 1929: 

A survey of the health situation shows a general improvement dur- 
ing the past year. A much greater improvement would have been 
po^ssible if there had been a more general acceptance of the preventative 
measures offered and recommended by this department. 

It is also gratifying to note the substantial decrease in the number 
of communicable diseases reported as compared with those reported 
in 1928. 

Considerable preventative work has been accomplished through the 
State Ten Year Tuberculosis Clinic, the Schick Test and Immunization, 
the Summer Round-up or Pre-School and Dental Clinics and the cor- 
rection of the defects revealed during the annual physical examination 
of the public school children. Similar work has also been carried on 
at the Parochial School under the direction and supervision of Sister 
Superior Mary Margaret, with excellent results. 

The inauguration of an extensive sewer construction program in 
the eastern section of the town has made possible the elimination of 
approximately 100 cesspools, the major portion of them having been a 
real menace to the health of that community as well as a source of 
expense and trouble to the property owners. There still remains a 
large portion of that section of the town that it just as badly in need 
of relief and it is my recommendation that the program of construction 
for the coming year be in accordance with the recommendations of the 
Sewer Commissioners and this department as contained in the warrant 
for the next annual town meeting. 

During the past two years the system of collection, disposition, 
handling and storage of clam, lobster, and oyster shells as well as the 
fish trimmings and other waste refuse from the beach, hotels, markets 
and restaurants has been the subject of many complaints and much 
criticism. Because of lack of proper facilities for the reception and 
storage of the material while awaiting removal it is practically im- 
possible to remedy existing conditions. Removal of the material twice 
daily, morning and afternoon, might improve conditions during the 
summer months but it is doubtful if such service can be obtained for 
the amount now paid for the work. There is no question about the 
present system of disposal being unsanitary and I would recommend 
that the next contract and proposals for the collection of garbage include 
thie collection and disposition of such material. 

The early start of the bathing season made it necessary to start 
the work of cleaning beaches on June 3, two weeks earlier than usual. 
The w^ork continued through the summer and was terminated on 
September 12. Many favorable comments have been made about the 
cleanliness of the beaches during the bathing season. 

From present indications it is apparent that the Forest avenue 
and Paradise road dumps will soon be filled and it will be necessary 
to procure new dumping places for those sections. The problem will 
not be a diflPicult one to solve at Forest avenue as several locations are 
available nearby. The situation at Paradise road is not so favorable 
and it is quite likely that some difficulty will be experienced in solving 
the problem. 

At the request of the Park Commissioners all material collected 
in the vicinity of Phillips Park is now being deposited thereon and the 
dump at Pleasant street has been temporarily discontinued. 

The closing of the dump and the care of the material deposited at 
Phillips Park by employes of the Park Department has made it possible 
for this department to devote more time to the other dumps, thereby 
helping them to be put in a more satisfactory condition. 



1929] 



REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH 



lis 



Collections of ashes and garbage have been very satisfactory during 
the year and there is no question but that both contractors are en- 
deavoring to give the citizens good service. 

The resignation of Mrs. Barbara M. Lewis, who has so efficiently 
served as clerk of the office during the past five years, was accepted 
with much reluctance. Miss Clara Wentworth was selected to fill 
the vacancy. 

The following is a summary of the work of the department during 
the year: 

CLERICAL WORK 

The following is a summary of the clerical work of the department: 



New cases reported — 232 

Cases placarded - - 44 

Cases released 147 

Cases investigated 18 

Pupils excluded from school 122 

Certificates to attend school - 121 

Cultures received for examination '. 43 

Specimens received for examination 6 

Inspections 

Number of complaints received 913 

Number of inspections made 210 

Verbal notices given 418 

Written notices to abate . 21 

Legal notices to abate 4 

Conferences and Consultations 

With physicians 209 

With nurses, social workers, etc „ 929 

With school authorities 131 

With parents and guardians 105 

Clerical and General 

Number of telephone calls 2245 

Number of letters written 380 

Number of special reports made 982 

Number of inquiries received 160 

Number of inquiries answered 160 

Miscellaneous 

Number of school children examined 3267 

Number of physical defects found 314 

Number of notices sent to parents 507 

Number of laboratory supplies furnished - 482 

PHYSICAL EXAMINATIONS 1929 



Schools 


Clarke 


Hadley Jr. 


High 


Machon 


Palmer 


Total 


Number examined 


270 


239 


392 


189 


178 


1268 


Adenoids 








1 








1 


Feet and spine 


3 


3 


4 





1 


11 


Glands 


1 














1 


Heart 


3 


1 





1 





5 


Lungs 


1 














1 


Mentality 











9 





9 


Nerves 











9 





9 


Nutrition 


2 


2 


7 








11 


Posture 


6 


2 


7 


6 


5 


26 


Skin 











1 





1 


Tonsils — large 


14 


4 


14 


13 


4 


49 


Tonsils — diseased 


7 


5 


9 


4 


3 


28 


Vision 


8 


22 


93 


8 


5 


136 


Weight 


36 


22 


67 


16 


21 


162 


Total 


81 


61 


202 


67 


39 


450 



116 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



SCHICK TEST AND IMMUNIZATION 1929 



Positive Test 



School 


Positive 


Combined 


Pseudo 


Negative 


Only 


Total 


Clarke 










Boys 


21 


2 





9 





32 


Girls 


20 


3 





10 





33 


Hadley 














Boys 


39 


2 





26 





67 


Girls 


30 


7 





25 





62 


Machon 














Boys 


13 


2 





11 





26 


Girls 


11 








15 





26 


Palmer 














Boys 


5 








6 





11 


Girls 


9 














9 


St. John's 














Boys 


11 








17 





28 


Girls 


11 


1 





23 





35 


Total 


170 


17 





142 





329 



REPORTS OF COMMUNICABLE DISEASES 1929 





c 


j3 


Mar. 


u 

a 
< 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


o 

O 


Nov, 


u 

p 


Total 


Cerebro spinal meningitis 









































Chicken pox 


32 


14 


6 


9 


10 


8 


7 





1 








3 


90 


Diphtheria 


1 


1 


1 





2 











3 





3 





11 


Dog-bite 





1 


1 


4 


6 


4 


4 


3 








3 


4 


30 


Encethalitis lethargica 









































Erysipelas 























1 














1 


German measles 

















1 




















1 


Impetigo 























1 


4 





1 





6 


Infantile paralysis 









































Inflamed eyes 









































Influenza 


15 


4 
































19 


Lobar pneumonia 


3 


2 


2 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 








1 


2 


16 


Measles 


1 





1 





























2 


Mumps 














1 





4 





1 








1 


7 


Scarlet fever 


3 


6 


2 


2 


2 


1 


3 


2 


3 








3 


27 


Septic sore throat 









































Tuberculosis (pulmonary) 





1 











2 




















3 


Tuberculosis (other forms) 














1 





5 











1 





7 


Typhoid fever 




















1 

















1 


Whooping cough 








1 


6 


5 


2 





1 


1 








3 


19 


Total 


55 


29 


14 


22 


28 


20 


25 


9 


13 





9 


16 


240 



1929] REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH 

DEATHS FROM CONTAGIOUS DISEASES 1929 



117 



_ 






u 

CTJ 


u 


>> 


<u 
G 




to 


o* 


o 


> 
o 


y 

(U 


0) 

■*-» 

o 




> 


<u 




< 






1—, 


< 


<u 
C/5 


r\ 
\J 




1— 1 




Anterior poliomyelitis 









































Chicken pox 









































Diphtheria 









































Dog-bite 









































Epidemic cerebro spinal 




























meningitis 









































German measles 









































Ophthalia neonatorum 









































Suppurative conjunctivitis 









































Trachoma 









































Lobar pneumonia 


2 


2 


2 








1 





1 








1 





9 


Measles 









































Mumps 









































Scarlet fever 









































Septic sore throat 









































Tuberculosis (pulmonary) 


























1 











1 


Tuberculosis (other forms) 









































Typhoid fever 


0* 






































Whooping cough 









































Total 


2 


2 


2 








1 





1 


1 





1 





10 



SWAMPSCOTT RESIDENTS DYING OUT OF TOWN 
FROM CONTAGIOUS DISEASES 

Male Female Total 



Lobar pneumonia .. 3 3 

DEATHS FROM ALL CAUSES 

General Diseases: 

Cancer of bladder 10 1 

Cancer of breast 3 3 

Cancer of large intestine Oil 

Cancer of liver Oil 

Cancer of peritoneum Oil 

Cancer of prostate 10 1 

Cancer of stomach 2 2 

Cancer of uterus 2 2 

Influenza 112 

Intestinal obstruction 10 1 

Diseases of Nervous System: 

Apoplexy 1 1 

Cerebral hemorrhage 3 6 9 

Eclampsia Oil 

Myelitis 1 1 

Diseases of Circulatory System: 

Angina pectoris 112 

Arterio sclerosis 8 10 18 

Acute dilatation of heart 3 3 

Mitral regurgitation . Oil 

Myocardial degeneration Oil 

Myocarditis, acute 2 13 

Myocarditis, chronic 3 3 

Thrombosis of heart 10 1 

Valvular disease of heart 3 4 7 



118 TOWN DOCUMENTS [Dec. 31 



Diseases of Respiratory System: 

Pneumonia, broncho 4 3 7 

Pneumonia, lobar 2 4 6 

Diseases of Digestive System: 

Appendicitis, acute 1 1 , 

Intestinal ulcer Oil 

Gastritis - 1 1 

Peritonitis Oil 

Old Age: 

Senility 1 2 3 

Affections Produced by External Causes: 

Fracture 2 13 

Suicide by firearms 10 1 

1929 DEATHS BY MONTHS 

Male Female Total 

January 7 5 12 

February 3 6 9 

March ^ 6 5 11 

April 4 2 6 

May 3 6 9 

June 2 2 4 

July 5 2 7 

August 14 5 

September 2 4 6 

October 3 2 5 

November 2 13 

December 5 10 15 

1929 MORTUARY REPORT 

Male Female Total 

Stillbirths 1 1 2 

Under 1 year 

From 1 to 2 years — 

" 2 to 3 years 1 1 

" 3 to 4 years 1 1 

" 4 to 5 years 112 

" 5 to 10 years 

" 10 to 15 years - 1 1 

" 15 to 20 years : 

" 20 to 30 years 3 2 5 

" 30 to 40 years 1 3 4 

40 to 50 years 4 4 

" 50 to 60 years 6 3 9 

" 60 to 70 years 15 7 22 

" 70 to 80 years 9 10 19 

" 80 to 90 years _ 5 13 18 

" 90 to 100 years _ 2 2 4 

SUMMARY OF STATE T. B. CLINIC 

Population of school children (public and parochial) 1544 

Total number of children examined 

Public schools 545 

Parochial schools 186 

Total 731 



Percentage examined of the number of children in school. 



47% 



1929] REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH 



119 



Total number of contacts examined 

Public schools 21 

Parochial schools 5 

Total 26 

(This figure represents the number of reported cases only) 

Total number of children given the tuberculin test 

Public schools 545 

Parochial schools 186 

Total 731 

Total number of children who reacted . to the test 

Public schools ! 85 

Parochial schools 30 

Total 115 

Total percentage of reactors 16% 

Total number X-Rayed 

Public schools 86 

Parochial schools 33 

Total 119 

Total number of cases of hilum tuberculosis 

Public schools 4 

^ Parochial schools 1 

Total number of cases classified as suspects 

Public schools 14 

Parochial schools 6 

Total 20 

Total number of cases classified as negative 

Public schools 68 

Parochial schools 26 

Total 94 

Percentage of hilum cases of the number of children X-Rayed 4% 
Percentage of hilum cases of the number of children examined 

7/10 of 1% 

Percentage of suspicious cases of the number of children X-Rayed 17% 
Percentage of suspicious cases of the number of children exam- 
ined 3% 

Percentage of negative cases of the number of children X-Raj^ed 79% 

Total number of children with enlarged or diseased tonsils 
and adenoids 

Public schools 154 

Parochial schools 63 

Total 217 

Percentage of T. and A. cases of the number of children ex- 
amined 30% 

Total number of children in need of dentistry 

Public schools 190 

Parochial schools 102 

Total 292 

Percentage of dental cases of the number of children examined 40% 



120 TOWN DOCUMENTS [Dec. 31 



Total number of cases showing abnormal heart sound 

Public schools 5 

Parochial schools — 4 

Total 9 

Percentage of heart cases of the number of children examined 1% 

Total number of cases of malnutrition 

Public schools 45 

Parochial schools 13 

Total - - - 58 

Percentage of malnutrition cases of the number of children 

examined — _ 8% 

PRE-SCHOOL CLINIC 

Number of days of clinic 5 

Number of children examined 103 

Number without defects 61 

Number of defects found 121 

SUMMARY OF DEFECTS 

Eye 2 

Ear 1 

Heart 3 

Lungs Q, 

Nose 20 

Osthopedic 2 

Posture — 7 

Scalp 1 

Skin . 1 

Teeth 12 

Throat 49 

10% Underweight 2 



Total defects 121 

SUMMARY 

Deaths in Swampscott during 1929 92 

Non-residents dying in town 11 

Swampscott residents dying out of town 29 

Total deaths of Swampscott residents 1929 121 

Death rate . 12.1 

Total number resident deaths, male 43 

Total number resident deaths, female . 49 

Average age, male 60.3 

Average age, female 61.0 

Total births in town 137 

Total births out of town 78 

Still births in town 2 

Still births out of town 1 

Deaths under 1 year in town 

Deaths under 1 year out of town..... 2 

The following permits have been issued during 1929: 

To keep fowl 289 

To construct cesspools and drains 49 

To undertakers 2 

To transport garbage and refuse 2 

To collect tallow and grease 1 

To remove night soil 1 



1929] 



REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH 



121 



The following licenses have been issued during 1929: 

To sell alcohol 20 

To manicure 7 

To sell non-alcoholic beverages — 1 

The sum of $45.40 has been collected from licenses and permits and 
said amount has been paid to the collector and his receipt obtained. 
Respectfully submitted, 

CLARENCE W. HORTON, 
Health Officer. 



Milk Inspector 



To the Board of Health: 

Gentlemen: — I herev^ith submit the following report for the year 
ending December 31, 1929: 

One case of typhoid fever has been reported during the year. 
After a careful and thorough investigation it was found that the illness 
was not due to milk as the patient had not only been in contact with 
relatives having the disease but had also been exposed to the disease 
by reason of his having personally attended to the removal, from the 
basement of his home, of the overflow of a cesspool that had without 
question been contaminated during visits of said relatives to his home. 
In order to prevent further spread of the disease, by means of the 
overflowing cesspool, the Sewer Commissioners caused the sewer in 
Bradlee avenue to be extended into Francis, Lawrence and Morton 
roads so that the premises could be connected with the public sewerage 
system and the danger of further spread of the disease through the 
cesspool eliminated. 

Last year inspections were only made at those dairies producing 
so-called "Market," "Regular," or "Grade B" milk. This year in- 
spections have been extended to dairies producing "Grade A" milk and 
cream. There has been a decided improvement in barns, niilkrooms 
and the methods of handling the milk or cream but there is still plenty 
of room for improvement. It is a fortunate thing for the producers 
that the consuming public is not familiar with the conditions under 
which he is producing and handling milk and cream at his dairy. It 
matters not how much apparatus or how expensive equipment a dealer 
may have, he can not make the milk clean if it is not clean when it 
leaves the place of production. Experience convinces me that the 
needed improvements will not be made in the majority of cases unless 
constant supervision is maintained and definite measures are taken to 
stop the producer, who refuses to maintain his dairy under proper 
sanitary conditions, from disposing of his milk or cream until he has 
made the required corrections and improvements. The fact that pro- 
ducers are now able to dispose of their products to dealers supplying 
other communities without molestation has made it difficult to obtain 
the desired results. There is not the slightest doubt but that an inves- 
tigation of present conditions would convince the consuming public of 
the need of dairy inspection. 

Chapter 94, Section 43, of the General Laws as amended by Chapter 
122 of the Acts of 1924 says that no producer of or dealer in milk shall 
sell or deliver for sale in any city or town any milk produced or dealt 
in by him without first obtaining from the board of health of such town 
a permit authorizing such sale or delivery, said board of health to 
issue such permit after an inspection of the milk, and the place where 
and the circumstances under which it is being produced and handled 
has been made by it or its representative. Any permit so granted may 
contain such reasonable conditions as said board of health deems suit- 



122 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



able for protecting the public health and may be revoked for failure to 
comply with any of such conditions. If the Board of Health refuses to 
issue a permit under this section or a permit previously issued is re- 
voked the producer or dealer may appeal to the State Department of 
Public Health, whose decision is final. Violation of this section is 
punishable by a fine of not more than one hundred dollars. 

After several years' effort in trying to comply with the provisions 
of the above mentioned law and in observation of its effect I find that 
the law is not only impracticable and being ignored by a great majority 
of health departments of cities and towns throughout the State, but it is 
the medium by which unscrupulous inspectors of some cities and towns 
are obtaining a living of luxury and ease in the country at the expense 
of the taxpayers of their communities while the conditions about the 
dairies remain the same and the milk and cream as well as the milking 
equipment continues to be stored and soaked in the tub of water used 
for watering cattle and horses. 

A general clean up and improvement of the disgusting, filthy and 
unsanitary conditions that are existing generally today upon the farms 
where milk and cream is being produced can not be expected nor will 
it be obtained without the assistance and co-operation of the health 
departments of every city and town. Conditions in this State are no 
better, if as good, as those prevailing in other New England States 
included in my inspections. 

Another ludicrous part of the present situation is that although 
attempts are being made to inspect dairies located in Maine, New 
Hampshire, New York and Vermont, milk and cream is being shipped 
into this State every day from dairies located in Minnesota and Wis- 
consin. So far as I am able to find out, no inspector of any department, 
either local or State, has ever inspected the dairies of producers in those 
States, still the law says they shall not sell or deliver for sale, in this 
State, milk or cream without first obtaining a permit from the Board of 
Health of every city and town in which said products are to be sold 
or delivered for sale, said boards being authorized to issue such per- 
mits only after an inspection of the dairy and milk or cream has been 
made by them or their authorized representative. How many cities 
and towns are there that can afford to send their inspectors such dis- 
tances? From present indications, none — which goes to show the ab- 
surdity of a law that the departments, charged with the enforcement 
thereof, can not and do not live up to its provisions themselves. 

Lack of funds necessary to permit inspectors to inspect dairies of 
producers located outside the Commonwealth presents a legitimate and 
valid excuse or reason for their failure to maintain supervision over 
such dairies, but there is no valid excuse or reason why an inspector 
who is sent into the country to inspect the dairies supplying his com- 
munity should not do so and give the citizens of his city or town the 
protection of which they are entitled. Nor is there any reason why an 
inspector or the health department of every city and town in this State 
should not be held strictly to account for the existence of an unsanitary 
dairy within their community. Nor should it be necessary for an in- 
spector to compel a producer located in another city or town, in this 
State, to put his dairy in a sanitary condition. That is a proper function 
of the local inspector or health department and there should be a law 
compelling them to do their duty and if they fail there should be an 
officer or department having the authority and power to do it for them 
at the expense of the community. 

Dairy inspection as required by the present law is in my estimation 
too large a proposition for the average town and the majority of cities 
to handle, and the present law should be repealed at once and the power 
of inspection and the issuance of permits delegated, to either the De- 
partment of Agriculture or Public Health. Personally I am not in 
favor of delegating authority over local affairs to a State department, 
but the inspection of dairies is more than a local proposition and should. 



1929] 



REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH 



123 



therefore, be delegated to such a department and a bill or resolve should 
be presented to the Legislature providing for the establishment of a 
special unpaid commission to consist of the Commissioner of Agricul- 
ture, the Commissioner of Public Health, a representative of the New- 
England Milk Producers' Association, a representative of the Massa- 
chusetts Milk Inspectors' Association and a representative of the Massa- 
chusetts Milk Dealers' Association to investigate and make a study and 
survey of the present system of dairy inspection as maintained by cities 
and towns of the Commonwealth, said commission to report to the 
General Court the results of its investigations and its recommendations, 
if any, together with drafts of legislation necessary to carry the same 
into effect. 

The above comments and criticisms of the present law and system 
of dairy inspection as well as the recommendations will probably not 
meet with the approval of some departments and inspectors, but they 
are facts nevertheless and an unbiased investigation will substantiate 
them. 

The present system of inspection of this department has brought 
about a general improvement in the conditions under which the milk 
supply of this town is being produced and handled, and while it is my 
opinion that dairy inspection should be uniform and centralized under 
the administration and control of a division of some State department 
I do not believe our system should be abandoned until such a situation 
has been brought about. 

The present milk, cream and ice cream regulations were adopted 
June 14, 1923. Since that time several new laws have been enacted 
and new regulations promulgated by the Department of Public Health 
with the result that many of them are now null and void. The adoption 
of a code of regulations in keeping with the present laws and regula- 
tions of the State Department is recommended. 

The following is a summary of the inspections during the year: 



124 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



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1929] 



REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH 



125 



The following licenses and permits have been issued during the 



year: 

To stores 54 

, To dealers 20 

To sell ice cream 26 

To manufacture ice cream 5 

To sell oleomargarine 7 



The sum of $45.50 has been received for said licenses and this 
amount has been paid to the Collector and his receipt obtained. 
Respectfully submitted, 

CLARENCE W. HORTON, 
Milk Inspector. 

Dental Clinic 

To the Board of Health: 

Gentlemen: — I herev^^ith present a report of the activities of the 
Dental Clinic for the year ending December 31, 1929. 

The clinic is now well systemized and functioning smoothly. There 
has been a tremendous amount of dental work completed but much still 
remains to be done. During the last examination a decided improve- 
ment was shown. 

At the opening of school every child in the first six grades is given 
a thorough dental examination and a chart of any defects is made. 
Every child having any dental defects is given a notification card for 
their parents' inspection. The parent should either have the work done 
by the family dentist or sign the card and the child is taken care of 
by the clinic. 

Another examination is given in the spring to check up and again 
remind the child of any work which has been neglected by them. The 
children returning signed cards are taken in turn and are reached some- 
time during the school year. 

Below is given a list of operations completed during the year: 

Examinations 1776 

Cement fillings 111 

Amalgam fillings 810 

Porcelain fillings 22 

Pulp cappings 20 

Relief 62 

Extractions 344 

Novocain 225 

Prophylaxis 197 



Total 3567 

Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES J. FENELON, D.M.D., 

Dentist in Charge. 

Inspector of Plumbing 



To the Board of Health: 

Gentlemen: — I herewith submit the following report for the year 
ending December 15, 1929: 

Plumbing permits issued 210 

Installations approved 204 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDWARD C. PHILLIPS, 
Plumbing Inspector. 



126 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



Health Nurse 



To the Board of Health: 

Gentlemen: — I herewith submit a report of work done during the 
year ending December 31, 1929: 



School visits -— 570 

Home visits 1280 

Examinations for contagious diseases 3100 

Examinations for uncleanliness — 260 

Pediculosis _ 35 

Sight and hearing 1150 

Pre-school examinations - 103 

State T. B. Clinic -- 700 

Dental examinations 1280 

Schick test 329 

Physical examinations 1268 

Visits to clinics 130 



Respectfully submitted, 

M. K. HAMMOND, R.N, 
Health Nurse. 



Inspector of Slaughtering 



To the Board of Health: 

Gentlemen: — The work this year has consisted, principally, of in- 
spections of animals slaughtered for family use. 

The persons carrying on this work have complied with all the laws 
governing slaughtering and the carcasses have been properly stamped. 
There have been no carcasses condemned. , 

Permits have been granted in each case after the premises have 
been examined and found to be in a satisfactory condition for such work. 

There are no public slaughter-houses in town, consequently there 
are no regular days for making these inspections, but usually they are 
made at the owner's convenience. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRANK B. STRATTON, M.D.V., 
Inspector of Slaughtering. 



1929] REPORT OF BOARD OF PUBLIC WELFARE 127 



Board of Public Welfare 



To the Citizens of Swampscott: 

We herewith suT^mit our annual report for the year 1929: 

This department differs from all others of the town, in that it is 
impossible to estimate exactly w^hat the expenditures for the year are 
going to be. As is the case this year, as shown in the secretary's re- 
port, we were forced to overdraw our appropriation to take care of 
families made needy through sickness, unemployment and death. 

As the town grows, so must our acitivities, and while it is always 
the object of the board to operate at a minimum cost, there will always 
be a variation over which we have no control. 

As a point of information it may interest the citizens to know that 
all money reimbursed the town by the State and cities and towns, re- 
verts to the town treasury, and not to the Public Welfare Department. 

The financial and statistical report will be found under the head- 
ing of the Secretary's report. 

JOSEPH F. CROWELL, Chairman. 
EDMUND RUSSELL, Secretary, 
HARRY E. CAHOON. 



SECRETARY'S REPORT 



Persons having settlement in Swampscott aided by other 

cities and towns . 34 

Families partially supported in Swampscott 15 

Men, women and children receiving aid from Swampscott, 

during 1929 132 

Settlements in Swampscott - . 99 

Settlements elsewhere in State 12 

State settlements 21 

Persons fully supported in State Hospital 3 

Persons fully supported in Salem Home 1 



FINANCIAL REPORT 

Reimbursed by State $1,057.98 

Reimbursed by cities and towns 544.67 

Due from State 1,963.24 

Due from cities and towns 1,386.87 



EDMUND RUSSELL, Secretary. 



128 TOWN DOCUMENTS [Dec. 31 



Water and Sewerage Board 

WATER DEPARTMENT 

To the Citizens of Swampscott: 

We submit herewith our annual report for the year ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1929. For some few years past we have been much handicapped 
by lack of pressure during the summer months. We have several times 
taken the matter up with the Metropolitan Water Board, and with the 
completion of their new supply line this last fall, they assure us there 
will be no further trouble. For some time the board has had under 
consideration the question of reduction of water rates. The present 
financial conditions of the Water Department seems to warrant a 
reduction, and on December 6, the board voted that from January 1, 
1930, the minimum rate will be $9.00 for 3333 feet, a reduction of 10%,. 
and the excess rates will be 25c per 100 feet, a reduction of 16^%. 



Extension of main; 


s (with cost) 


including gat( 


es, hydrants, etc. 


Whitman road 


344 ft. 6-in 


C. 


I. 


pipe 


$595.28 


Nason road 


168 ft. 6-in 


C. 


I. 


pipe 


498.83 


Bates road 


700 ft. 6-in 


C. 


I. 


pipe 


1,554.35 


(including 255 feet 


2-in. pipe re 


;placed) 




Atlantic road 


315 ft. 6-in. 


C. 


I. 


pipe 


546.25 


Dale street 


145 ft. 6-in 


c. 


I. 


pipe 


202.20 


Plymouth avenue 


250 ft. 6-in. 


c. 


I. 


pipe 


1,015.80 


Commonwealth avenue 


200 ft. 6-in. 


c. 


I. 


pipe 


434.66 



$4,847.37 

Gates: 

In use, December 31, 1928 578 

Added 8 



Total December 31, 1929 586 
Hydrants: 

In use, December 31, 1928 ' 26^ 

Added 6 



Total December 31, 1929 275 
Services: 

In use December 31, 1928 2,563 
Added 65 
Abandoned 3 



62 



Total December 31, 1929 2,625 
Meters: 

Total cost to December 31, 1928 $29,531.55 

Purchased during year, 49 1,172.39 



Total cost to December 31, 1929 $30,703.94- 



1929] REPORT OF WATER AND SEWERAGE BOARD 129 



Table of Distributing Pipe in Feet, December 31, 1929 

Wrought Cast Cement 

Iron Iron Lined Kalemin Total 

VA inch 528 528 



1/2 

2 



4 
6 
8 
10 
12 
14 



80 80 

9,655 1,153 10,808 

6,335 1,031 7,366 

111,825 1,861 113,686 

7,375 7,375 

21,800 21,800 

6,714 6,714 

3,721 3,721 



9,655 157,770 3,622 1,031 172,078 



Water Debt 

Bonds and notes issued to December 31, 1929 $368,300.00 
Bonds and notes paid to December 31, 1929 289,300.00 



Net water debt $79,000.00 

Decrease during year $8,500.00 
Bonds and notes due 1930 $8,000.00 
(For details of above debt see report of Town Treasurer.) 

Inventory of Property, Water Department 
December 31, 1929 

Water mains and standpipe $215,369.31 
Land on Pine street • 2,000.00 
Brick building, Pine street 2,000.00 
Work shop and garage 2,500.00 
Auto truck and coupe 800.00 
Office furniture 800.00 
Meters and parts 30,703.94 
Stock on hand 8,000.00 

$262,173.25 



GEO. D. R. DURKEE, 
HAROLD G. ENHOLM, 
CHARLES E. HODGDON, 

Water and Sewerage Board. 

SEWER DEPARTMENT 

In accordance with the vote of the town at the last town meeting, 
the trunk line or Interc-epting Sewer, and many of the laterals in the 
eastern section of the town have been completed, as have also lateral 
sewers in Lawrence, Francis and Morton roads as ordered by the 
Board of Health. There seems to be an urgent demand for more of 
these lateral sewers, all of which will be taken up under articles in 
the town warrant. 

Sewer maintenance 

Appropriation $9,000.00 
Expended 8,999.97 



Balance $ .03 

Particular sewers 

Appropriation $1,000.00 

Expended 731.70 



Balance 



$ 268.30 



130 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



Construction Details 
Walker Road Sewer, P. J. McDermott, contractor: 
66 lin. ft. 8-in. vit. pipe 
74 Hn. ft. 6-in. vit. pipe 
179 lin. ft. 5-in. vit. pipe 
50 cu. yds. ledge 
2 manholes 
Extras 
Advertising 
Rings and covers 
Water department 
Stencils 



@ $1.55 


$102.30 


@ 1.49 


110.26 


@ 1.25 


223.75 


@ 6.00 


300.00 


@ 45.00 


90.00 




35.20 




18.90 




37.03 




17.93 




1.25 



$936.64 



Bristol Ave. and Barnstable Street, John Williams, contractor: 
Bristol avenue 
386 lin. ft. 6-in. vit. pipe 
286 lin. ft. 5-in. vit. pipe 
19 cu. yds. ledge 
3 manholes 

Extra work: 
6 lin. ft. 6-in. vit. pipe 
5 hours labor 
30 cu. yds. gravel 



Plus 15% 



@ 


$4.00 


$1,552.00 


@ 


2.00 


572.00 


@ 


1.00 


19.00 


@ 


60.00 


180.00 


@ $ .50 


$3.00 




@ .70 


3.50 




@ 1.60 


48.00 






$54.50 






8.18 





62.68 



Barnstable street 

216 lin. ft. 6-in. vit. pipe @ $4.00 864.00 

132 lin. ft. 5-in. vit. pipe @ 2.00 264.00 

67 cu. yds. ledge @ 1.00 67.00 

2 manholes @ 60.00 120.00 

Extra work: 

19 cu. yds. gravel @ $1.60 $30.40 

Plus 15% 4.56 

34.96 



Advertising 11.02 

Stencils 2.50 

flings and covers 80.72 

Water department 7.55 

Inspection 90.87 



$3,928.30 

Ocean Avenue, Bradlee Avenue and Humphrey Street, John Wil- 
liams, contractor: 
Ocean avenue 

279 lin. ft. 6-in. vit. pipe @ $1.90 $530.10 

48 lin. ft. 5-in. vit. pipe @ .90 43.20 

2 manholes @ 75.00 150.00 
Bradlee avenue 

341 lin. ft. 8-in. vit. pipe @ $3.00 1,023.00 

1605 lin. ft. 6-in. vit. pipe @ 1.90 3,049.50 

351 lin. ft. 5-in. vit. pipe @ .90 315.90 

8 manholes @ 75.00 600.00 

^200 ft. sheathing (left in) @ 60.00 192.00 

Extra work: 

115 tons stone @ $1.85 $212.75 

500 gallons asphalt @ .12 60.00 



$272.75 

Plus 15% 40.91 



313.66 



1929] REPORT OF WATER AND SEWERAGE BOARD 131 



Advertising 19.95 

Blue print and stencils 5.55 

Rings, covers and steps ' 174.23 

Water department 120.31 

Inspection 182.48 

Phillips Avenue Sewer, John Williams, contractor: 

722 lin. ft. 8-in. vit. pipe @ $1.70 $1,227.40 

578 lin. ft. 6-in. vit. pipe @ 1.70 982.60 

352 lin. ft. 5-in. vit. pipe @ 1.00 352.00 

6 manholes @ 65.00 390.00 

Blue prints and stencils 1.75 

Rings and covers 105.81 

Advertising 16.80 

Water department 20.85 

Inspection 87.50 



$6,719.88 



3.184.71 



Eastern Intercepting Sewer Extension, A. D. Daddario, contractor: 
1038 lin. ft. 18-in. vit. pipe 
2190 lin. ft. 15-in. vit. pipe- 

470 lin. ft. 12-in. vit. pipe 

102 lin. ft. 10-in. vit. pipe 

242 lin. ft. 10-in. C. I. pipe 
1165 lin. ft. 8-in. vit. pipe 
1013 lin. ft. 6-in. vit. pipe 
1630 lin. ft. 5-in. vit. pipe 

200 cu. yds. ledge 
33 manholes 
98,500 ft. sheathing (left in) 



Extra work: 
891 hours labor 
108.75 hours foreman 

12 hours mason 

77 hours pump 
208.50 bags cement 

33 hours man and truck 

25 hours concrete mixer 
3 lin. ft. 8-in. vit. pipe 

26 lin. ft. 6-in. vit. pipe 
12 lin. ft. 5-in. vit. pipe 

1500 bricks 

1000 ft. sheathing 
45 lin. ft. 5-in. C. I. pipe 
36 lin. ft. 8-in. C. I. pipe 
32 tons stone 



@ 
@ 


$8.00 


$8,304.00 


3.50 


7,665.00 


@ 


3.00 


1,410.00 


@ 


2.50 


255.00 


■@ 

@ 


2.00 


484.00 


3.00 


3,495.00 


@ 
@ 


2.00 


2,026.00 


1.50 


2,445.00 


@ 


10.00 


2,000.00 


@ 


75.00 


2,475.00 


@ 


60.00 


5,910.00 


$ .65 


$579.15 




1.25 


135.94 




1.25 


15.00 




1.00 


77.00 




.65 


135.50 




2.00 


66.00 




1.25 


31.25 




.90 


2.70 




.35 


9.10 




.20 


2.40 




.02 


30.00 




60.00 


60.00 






25.00 






51.80 




1.25 


40.00 





$1,260.87 

Plus 15% 189.13 



Advertising 24.15 

Blue print and stencils 7.85 

Rings, covers and steps 609.71 

Inspection 870.83 

Lynn Gas & Electric Co. 38.70 

Water department 16.95 

Cast iron pipe 231.70 

Crushed stone 15.16 

E. C. Phillips, Inc. (pipe) 43.20 



36,469.00 



1,450.00 



1,858.25 
$39,777.25 



132 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



Sargent Road and Prospect Avenue Sewer, A. Mogavero, contractor; 

537 lin. ft. 6-in. vit. pipe @ $1.29 $692.73 

171 lin. ft. 5-in. vit. pipe @ 1.20 205.20 

541 cu. vds. ledge @ 5.00 2,705.00 

3 manholes @ 75.00 225.00 
Extra: 

72 cu. yds. gravel @ $1.60 $115.20 

3 davs labor (ffi 5.00 15.00 



$130.20 

Plus 15% 19.50 



30 cu. yds. gravel @ 1.60 $48.00 

Plus 15% 7.20 



149.73 



55.20 



Advertising 11.03 

Rings and covers 44.81 

Water department 24.96 

Stencils 1.25 



Lawrence road 






294 lin. ft. 6-in. vit. pipe 


@ $2.00 


$588.00 


123 lin. ft. 5-in. vit. pipe 


@ 1.50 


184.50 


1.5 cu. 5'ds. ledge 


@ 10.00 


15.00 


1 manhole 


@ 75.00 


75.00 


Francis road 






146 lin. ft. 6-in. vit. pipe 


@ $2.00 


292.00 


72 lin. ft. 5-in. vit. pipe 


@ 1.50 


108.00 


1 manhole 


@ 75.00 


75.00 


Morton road 




1000 lin. ft. 8-in. vit. pipe 


@ $3.00 


3,000.00 


328 lin. ft. 5-in. vit. pipe 


@ 1.50 


507.00 


19 cu. yds. ledge 


@ 10.00 


190.00 


4 manholes 


@ 75.00 


300.00 


Whitman Road Sewer, 


P. J. McDermott, 


contractor: 


349 lin. ft. 6-in. vit. pipe 


@ $1.55 


540.95 


35 lin. ft. 5-in. vit. pipe 


@ 1.35 


47.25 


2 manholes 


@ 45.00 


90.00 


224 cu. yds. ledge 


@ 4.85 


1,086.40 


Extra : 







Labor to connect Stanley School 

connection $40.60 
Plus 15% 6.09 

— 46.69 

Advertising 15.75 

Rings and covers 26.42 



King's Brook Culvert, John Williams, contractor: 

1021 lin. ft. 39-in. Seg. blocks @ $2.00 $8,168.00 

218 lin. ft. 30-in. Seg. blocks @ 6.50 1,417.00 

238 lin. ft. 30-in. D. S. vit. pipe @ 6.50 1,547.00 

11.5 cu. yds. ledge @ 15.00 172.50 

10 manholes @ 50.00 500.00 

2700 ft. sheathing (left in) @ 50.00 135.00 



$4,114.91 



Lawrence Road, Francis Road, and Morton Road, A. D. Dad- 
dario, contractor: 



$5,334.50 



$1,853.46 



1929] 



REPORT OF DOG OFFICER 



133 



Extra: 



Sewer connections, catch basins connect- 



ing old culvert and catch basins 
Advertising 
Blue print and stencils 
Rings and covers 
Water department 
F. B. Harris & Co. 
E. C. Phillips, Inc. 
John W. Sheehan (gravel) 
Inspection 
Stone dust 



654.66 
23.10 
4.90 
280.94 
8.55 
10.22 
105.57 
249.00 
240.00 
27.70 



$13,544.14 



Inventory of Property, Sewer Department 



December 31, 1929 



Pumping station 
Pumping plant 
Land 

Office furniture 
Tools 



$17,000.00 
14,000.00 
5,000.00 



350.00 
500.00 



$36,850.00 



Care of Brooks 



The King's Brook culvert as voted by the town at the last town 
meeting has been completed as far as Essex street without any cost to 
the town for easements, and has relieved quite serious conditions in 
this section. 



To the Board of Selectmen: 

There have been 41 complaints investigated this year. Nineteen 
dogs have been restored to their owners and fifty-one stray dogs have 
been taken care of. Have notified owners who have neglected to 
license their dogs, as called for in the public statutes, and as a result 
490 dogs have been licensed. I recommend that all German police dogs 
and Airedales be required to be on leash when on the street. 



GEO. D. R. DURKEE, 
HAROLD G. ENHOLM, 
CHARLES E. HODGDON, 



Water and Sewerage Board. 



Dog Officer 



Respectfully submitted. 



FRANK H. BRADFORD, 



Dog Officer. 



134 TOWN DOCUMENTS [Dec. 31 



Board of Fire Engineers 



.To the Board of Selectmen: 

Gentlemen: — The following is the report of the Board of Fire 
Engineers and the Chief of the Fire Department for the year ending 
December 31, 1929. 

Important Notice 

We would ask all persons discovering fires in buildings to ring the 
nearest box (if within reasonable distance) as it is quicker and more 
accurate than the telephone. If you think you must use the telephone, 
be sure to ask for Emergency Breakers 82. Do not simply ask for the 
Fire Department. 

Fire Alarms and Service Record 



Swampscott box alarms 70 

Swampscott telephone alarms 122 

Swampscott still alarms 17 

Lynn line boxes 9 

Lynn special calls 3 

Marblehead boxes 25 

Marblehead telephones 9 



Total 255 



Under the mutual-aid system, Chemical 4 of Lynn responded to 
30 Swampscott calls; Engine 8 of Lynn responded to 9 Swampscott 
calls; Ladder 1 of Lynn responded to 3 Swampscott calls; Engine 2 of 
Marblehead responded to 6 Swampscott calls. 

Hose, Ladders, Chemicals Used at Fires 

2J^ inch hose laid 
3 inch hose laid 
Chemical hose used 
Ladders used 
Gallons chemicals used 
Hours of duty 
Combination A answered 
Combination B answered 

Combination C answered , 
Combination D answered 

Valuation, Losses and Insurance 



Value of buildings in which fire occurred $465,700.00 

Damage to buildings in which fire occurred 5,797.27 

Insurance on buildings in which fire occurred 379,600.00 

Insurance paid on buildings in which fire occurred 5,485.27 

Loss over insurance 312.00 

Value of contents of above buildings 183,800.00 

Damage to contents of above buildings 2,856.68 

Insurance on contents of above buildings 139,700.00 

Insurance paid on contents of above buildings 2,520.40 

Loss over insurance 326.28 

Automobile fires 15 



Apparatus 

The apparatus is in good condition with the exception of our old 
service car which is a 1912 Cadillac purchased in 1916 and repaired 
from time to time until due to the infirmities of old age, it is now 
about ready to discard. 



21,700 ft. 

2,400 ft. 

4,800 ft. 

1,082 ft. 
1,295 
148 
121 calls 

80 calls 

90 calls 
107 calls 



1929] REPORT OF BOARD OF FIRE ENGINEERS 135 



2^ Inch Hose 

We now have 3800 feet of inch hose in good condition. We 
will require 500 feet this year and have so recommended. 

Chemical Hose 

We have in service 700 feet of this hose. 

Buildings 

Quite a little repair work has been done inside the Central Station 
by the men at that house, including enlarging the kitchen and putting 
in a new cement floor. This building will require only the usual re- 
pairs this year. 

The Phillips Beach Station is in good condition. 

Fire Alarm System 

There have been 82 alarms sent out over the system during the 
past year. 

We have also installed new boxes at the following locations: 
412 at Humphrey street and Harrison avenue. 

421 at Kensington lane and Lewis road. 

422 at the new Stanley school, Whitman road. 

For this year we have recommended two new boxes, one at Berk- 
shire street and Paradise road, and one on Humphrey street near 
Hemingway road. 

The fire alarm batteries at the Central Station must be renewed 
this year and we have recommended an appropriation for this purpose. 

On September 20 the Gamewell Fire Alarm Co. completed the 
work of placing underground cables in Humphrey street east of Atlantic 
avenue for our new main line, also connecting our new aerial loop to 
the same, for which $5000 was appropriated. This was the first work 
recommended as part of our five year program for displacing as much 
of our overhead construction as possible with underground cables, 
relieving overloaded circuits and rearranging the system to keep pace 
with the growth of the town and promote greater efficiency of the 
system. This was explained in detail in last year's annual report. 
Along this line our recommendation for this year is as follows: Start- 
ing at the junction of Humphrey street, Atlantic avenue and Puritan 
road, extend our main line cable (which comes to that point from 
Beach Bluff avenue) along Humphrey street about 4800 feet to Ingalls 
terrace in conduit left for our free use several years ago by the Tele- 
phone Co., placing along the line box posts, protector boxes, and lateral 
conduits for other circuits as directed. We have an estimate from a 
competent fire alarm engineer covering this work and have recom- 
mended an appropriation for the same. This work is the second leg, 
so to speak, of our program as developed at last year's town meeting 
to improve our fire alarm system. 

Remarks 

This department, co-operating with the School Department and the 
officials in charge of the St. John's Parochial school, furnished speakers 
and literature, and also held fire-drills in observance of fire prevention 
day, Oct. 9. 

A new Carey cellar pipe has been added to our equipment, which 
will enable us to do more effective work at cellar fires. 

We have also placed a foamite extinguisher in service on Combina- 
tion D at the Central Station for oil and grease fires. We now have 
one on each piece of apparatus. 

GEORGE B. LEARNED, 
BENJAMIN B. BLANCHARD, 
JAMES WARNOCK, 
JAMES WARNOCK, Chief. Fire Engineers. 



136 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



Police Department 



To the Board of Selectmen: 

Gentlemen: — In compliance with the town By-Laws, it is my 
privilege to transmit to you the summary and review of the manner in 
which the Police Department of the town of Swampscott performed its 
numerous and exacting duties during the year of 1929. 

Department Organization 

Chief . 1 

Captains 2 

Patrolmen 11 

Clerk 1 

Roster 

Date of 

Rank Name Appointment 

Chief Walter F. Reeves November 14, 1925 

Captain Eugene P. Brogan March 29, 1909 

Captain James M. Kennedy May 31, 1918 

Patrolman J. Henry Pedrick April 14, 1904 

Patrolman Charles Connell March 22, 1901 

Patrolman Almon B. Owens November 28, 1919 

Patrolman Frank T. Roach November 19, 1920 

Patrolman Samuel Hooper June 7, 1924 

Patrolman John P. Costin January 8, 1926 

Patrolman Joseph L. Shanahan January 8, 1926 

Patrolman George D. Horton January 8, 1926 

Patrolman Francis P. Wall January 8, 1926 

Patrolman James T. Jordan January 7, 1927 

Patrolman Herbert F. Frazier March 23, 1928 

Arrests 

Total number of arrests 329 

Male 291 

Female 24 

Juvenile - - 14 

Residents 69 

Non-residents 260 

Causes of Arrests 

Crimes against the person: 

Assault 7 

Assault and battery 3 

Manslaughter 1 

11 

Crimes against property: 

Breaking and entering 1 

Breaking, entering, and larceny 4 

Burglary 1 

Burglary while armed and assault and battery 1 

Larceny 6 

Larceny-attempt 1 

14 



1929] REPORT OF POLICE DEPARTMENT 137 

Crimes against public order: 

Bastardy 3 

Collecting junk without a license. 1 

Drunkenness, 1st offence 39 

Drunkenness, 2nd offence 2 

Drunkenness, 3rd offence 1 

Drunkenness, 5th offence 2 

Drunkenness, 6th offence 1 

Drunkenness, 7th offence - 2 

Drunkenness, 8th offence 1 

48 

Fugitive from justice 1 

Gaming on the Lord's Day 7 

Indecent exposure 1 

Insane 2 

Lewd, wanton, and lascivious 1 

Liquor laws, violating 2 

Motor vehicle laws, violating (15 for operating under 

the influence of liquor) _ 184 

Neglected child — — - 1 

Non-support of wife 1 

Stubborn child _ 2 

Terms of probation, violating 1 

Traffic rules, violating 47 

Vagrant - 1 

Uttering forged instruments 1 

304 

Recapitulation 

Crimes against person 11 

Crimes against property 14 

Crimes against public order 304 

329 

Summonses served for other police departments 231 



Disposition of Cases 

Appealed 9 

Committed to Danvers State Hospital 3 

Committed to House of Correction 2 

Committed to Lyman Industrial School 2 

Committed to Lancaster School for Girls, sentence suspended 1 

Committed to Shirley Industrial School 2 

Committed to State Prison 2 

Continued to 1930 5 

Discharged 2 

Dismissed 4 

Filed 47 

Filed on payment of costs 51 

Fined 164 

For other departments 7 

Held for Grand Jury „ 3 

Placed on probation 7 

Released 18 



138 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



Classification of Arrests by Months 













Non- 




Male 


Female 


Juvenile 


Residents 


Residents 


January 


2 








2 





February 


5 








2 


3 


March 


9 


1 


1 


4 


7 


April 


4 


1 





3 


2 


May 


11 





4 


4 


11 


June 


13 


2 





7 


8 


July 


57 


3 





7 


53 


August 


12 


1 





6 


7 


September 


22 


2 


4 


10 


18 


October 


46 


3 


1 


10 


40 


November 


65 


5 


4 


9 


65 


December 


45 


6 





4 


47 


Totals for year 291 


24 


14 


68 


261 



Miscellaneous Work 

Accidents reported and assistance rendered 10 

Auto accidents reported 60 

Passengers injured 48 

Pedestrians injured 15 

Pedestrians killed 2 

Autos tagged for traffic violations 673 

Breaking and entering cases investigated 8 

Breaking, entering, and larceny cases investigated 23 

Complaints investigated 676 

In regard to dogs 64 

In regard to blasting by Lynn Sand and Stone Company 75 

Defects in streets and sidewalks reported 26 

Disabled horses reported and ordered from work 1 

Disturbances quelled 15 

Dogs killed by motor vehicles 11 

Dogs reported missing 90 

Dogs shot by officers 5 

Gas leaks reported - 1 

Lights burning in vacant buildings 18 

Messages delivered 65 

Notices of intended transfer of motor vehicles filed 183 

Nuisances reported . 5 

Obstructions and dangerous places lighted up 26 

Officers detailed at request of citizens 175 

Persons found and cared for —.. 26 

Persons reported missing 7 

Residences temporarily unoccupied and special attention requested 65 

Runaway horses caught 1 

Sick persons assisted 3 

Stores and offices found open and secured 267 

Stray dogs turned over to owner or dog officer 57 

Street excavations reported 20 

Street lamps reported defective 78 

Suicides reported 1 

Transfers of second-hand motor vehicles recorded and filed 105 

Water leaks reported 12 

Wires reported broken or burning 27 



1929] REPORT OF POLICE DEPARTMENT 139 

Investigations 

Suspicious persons examined 38 

Amount of property reported stolen in Swampscott and 

recovered by this department $7,548.00 

Amount of property reported stolen in Swampscott and 

recovered by other departments $5,000.00 

Automobiles stolen in Swampscott and recovered by other 

departments 5 

Automobiles stolen elsewhere and recovered by this de- 
partment 11 



Police Signal System 

The police signal system has given the same satisfactory service 
as in the past three years. There are fifteen boxes or stations from 
which the men on street duty communicate with the police station. 
The duty calls reported during the year amounted to 17,288, and 452 
wagon calls were received. 

Traffic 

The handling of traffic is a problem which is becoming more serious 
each year. The shortage of patrolmen has necessitated me to ignore 
requests for officers at various places in the town. The condition of 
the wooden pavement on Humphrey street, during wet weather^ has 
been the cause of a number of motor vehicle accidents. An automatic 
flashing beacon has been installed, for trial, at the junction of Burrill 
and Essex streets. 

Motor Vehicle Service 

The motor vehicle equipment of the department consists of one Reo 
ambulance, one Studebaker automobile, two Ford roadsters, and two 
Harley-Davidson motorcycles. As in the past years, certain parts of 
the town are covered by patrolmen in Ford cars and motorcycle officers. 
The motorcycles are in good condition, the Fords are in poor condition, 
while the Studebaker, having covered about eighty thousand miles, is 
in a dangerous and unserviceable condition. This car should be ex- 
changed for a new one. 

The Force 

The discipline of the department has been good. Charges have 
been made against one patrolman for violation of the rules governing 
the department. In this case, the man was punished by being deprived 
of a certain number of days off. The members of the department have 
responded cheerfully to all calls for extra duty for, which no com- 
pensation is received. They have been particularly zealous in perform- 
ing their duties, thereby preventing crime and clearing up cases after 
crimes actually have been committed. 

I have devoted considerable time during the year to instructing 
the members of the department in revolver practice. 

Patrolman Samuel Hooper is deserving of special mention for 
meritorious service performed on June 8, when he arrested a common 
and notorious thief for burglary and larceny in dwelling houses while 
armed. Patrolman Herbert Frazier deserves credit for the arrest of a 
boy for breaking into and entering seventeen dwelling houses in the 
day and night time. 

I believe that two appointments should be made to increase the 
number of patrolmen to thirteen. 

The police officers of Swampscott are among the lowest paid in the 
State. Considering the cost of uniforms, which must be kept in first 
class condition, high rents, working seven days with one off in eight,. 
I believe the officers' salaries should be increased. 



140 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



The sum of $95.56 was transferred to the Police Department budget 
to cover a shortage in salaries, caused by running over my appropriation. 

The same policy governs the distribution and use of the police 
force. It is my constant endeavor to dispose the men under my imme- 
diate command to the best possible advantage, and especially in such 
manner that the public might have a full measure of their services and 
continuous adequate protection. 

Conclusion 

I wish to thank the town officials and citizens generally for their 
co-operation and assistance, and also to express to the members of the 
department my appreciation of their performance to duty. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WALTER F. REEVES, 

Chief of Police. 



Superintendent of Cemetery 



To the Board of Selectmen: 

Gentlemen: — I herewith submit my 14th report as Superintendent 
of the Swampscott Cemetery. 

Interments for the year 1929 numbered 76. 

The town has received for sale of lots and perpetual care $4,184.50. 
The Andrews Memorial Chapel has been in frequent use during 
the year. The new development in rear of cemetery made available 
some 28 lots, some of which have already been sold. Shrubs and trees 
were planted on new lots. Preparations are being made for future 
developments of the recently acquired land on Essex street. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THOMAS HANDLEY, 

Superintendent. 



Inspector of Wires 



To the Board of Selectmen: 

Gentlemen: — Report of the Inspector of Wires for the town of 
Swampscott for the year 1929: 

Sixty-nine new buildings have been inspected for roughing in 
wiring and fixture installation, and subsequently approved. 

Nine old houses have been inspected for roughing in wiring and 
fixture installation, and subsequently approved. 

Twenty-nine additions to wiring in old installation were inspected 
and subsequently approved. 

Twenty-one rejections in new wiring were made, and when prop- 
erly corrected were approved. 

Three buildings were cut off on account of fire, and ordered rewired 
before service was restored. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. A. COOK, 

Inspector of Wires. 



1929] REPORT OF TRUSTEES OF PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Trustees of the Public Library 



141 



To the Citizens of Swampscott: 

The Board of Trustees of the Public Library herewith submit their 
annual report. The report of the Librarian indicates the increasing use 
of the library by the townspeople the past year. 

The number of new books added during 1929 has exceeded the 
accessions of any previous year. Members of the Board of Trustees 
and of the committee on book selection have given special attention to 
the acquisition of those books of reference which form basic material 
for the adult reader, and without which the library cannot give proper 
reference service to the high school or college student. 

A real effort has been made by the school and library authorities 
to encourage the students to use the library. The Librarian has visited 
classes in the High School, and pupils in the lower grades have come to 
the library for instruction in the scope and use of material which we 
have to offer. This instruction is an important phase of progressive 
library work, but resultant increase in patronage makes the inadequacy 
of our present building more apparent than ever. There should be some 
arrangement which would provide a room in which adults would not 
be disturbed by the children, or by the work at the circulation desk. 

Our overcrowded stacks form an equally pressing problem. It is 
difficult to see how room is to be found on the shelves for the books 
which should be added during the coming year. 

In view of the foregoing facts, the Trustees recommend the addi- 
tion of a room at the rear of the present, building to be used as a study 
and reference room, such a room to provide facilities and quiet for the 
ever increasing number of students in the town, and those adults who 
would avail themselves of the opportunities for undisturbed reading and 
study. The present rooms, arranged as they are, with the circulation 
desk in the center, can never of course be entirely quiet. They are well 
adapted for general reading and periodical rooms. The cost of such an 
addition with the proper furnishings is estimated by the architect, in 
whose office the plans for the present building were made, as $31,000. 

The Trustees recommend the finishing and furnishing of the upper 
room in the present building for a children's room. Such a room would 
relieve the present congestion and, even more important, make it possi- 
ble for the library to improve and extend one of its most important de- 
partments. Providing for the educative influence of reading and foster- 
ing of an interest in good books is the duty and privilege of every 
community. It calls for an adequate and well equipped library. The 
cost of finishing and furnishing such a children's room is estimated 
at $10,000. 

During the past year. Miss Lois Lane, who had given a year of 
efficient service, resigned from her position in the library in order ta 
continue her studies. Miss Mildred Parker, a student in the Swampscott 
High School, was appointed to take her place. 

The Sunday attendance during the winter of 1928-1929 was as 
follows: Total attendance, 439; adults, 106; students, 149; children, 184. 

At the request of the Trustees the following citizens have given 
valued service in the reading and recommendation of books being con- 
sidered for addition to the library: Miss Louise C. Stanley, Donald 
Redfern, Mrs. James W. Santry, Mrs. Gustavus J. Esselen, Lee T. Gray. 

Thanks are due the many friends of the library for their interest, 
suggestions and gifts. In particular we would mention the very fine 
edition of 12 volumes of Italian Literature given by Mrs. Tillotson 



142 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



from the library of the late Rev. Edward Tillotson, for twenty-three 
years an honored and public spirited member of this community. Miss 
Esther Treat has presented the library with a bas-relief from Hunt's 
painting, "Horses." These and gifts of books from Mrs. Henrietta 
Esselen, Miss Esther Treat, Mrs. Louis Underwood, Mrs. Frederick 
J. Rudd, Miss Helen Smith and Miss Lissey Mills, the Trustees and 
Librarian gratefully acknowledge. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GUSTAVUS J. ESSELEN, JR., Chairman 

JEAN G. ALLAN, Secretary, 

ELIHU THOMSON, 

Board of Trustees. 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN 

Circulation: 

Adult fiction 30,625 

Adult non-fiction 5,652 



Juvenile fiction " 12,632 

Juvenile non-fiction 2,072 



36.277 



14,704 



Current periodicals 913 



51,894 

New books added during the year, 938. 

Books in the library, January 1, 1930, 13,091. There were 778 
volumes discarded during the year, mostly fiction. 
Fine receipts turned over to the town, $386.91. 



Inspector of Animals 



To the Board of Selectmen: 

Gentlemen: — At the general inspection this year all animals were 
found to be healthy and in good condition, also the premises where 
these animals were kept were clean, well ventilated and had sufficient 
light as prescribed by law. 

^ This general inspection is ordered each year by the Division of 
Animal Industry, and consists of a physical examination of all neat 
cattle, sheep and swine within the town and the work must be done 
during January and February, so that the books may be returned to 
the State House by March 15. 

There have been several people bitten by dogs this year, but there 
have been no cases of rabies reported. Under a ruling of the Division 
of Animal Industry all dogs that have bitten people shall be kept under 
restraint for two weeks and if, at the expiration of this period they 
appear healthy, upon physical examination, they are released. Of 
course, this is a precautionary measure for the protection of the persons 
that have been bitten. If the dog doesn't develop symptoms of rabies 
within the quarantine period of two weeks it is usually safe to release 
it as healthy. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRANK B. STRATTON, M.D.V., 

Inspector of Animals. 



1929] 



REPORT OF SURVEYOR OF HIGHWAYS 

Surveyor of Highways 



143 



To the Citizens of Swampscott: 

I herewith submit my annual report for the year 1929. All con- 
struction work this year has been done by contract. Franklin avenue, 
from Stetson avenue to State road, has been resurfaced with bituminous 
macadam asphalt, the work being done by Antonio Mogavero of Pea- 
body. The same contractor also resurfaced Monument avenue, Walker 
road, to Boston and Maine bridge. 

Nason road and Cedar road were reshaped and surfaced, sidewalks 
built, the work being done by Mark Kelley, of Peabody. 

Francis road reshaped, surfaced with gravel and sidewalks built. 

Bay View drive; no work done on this street. 

Puritan park streets reshaped, surfaced with tar and mixed stone 
where needed, and rolled. 

Fuller terrace, resurfaced with asphalt mixed top. 

Lewis road, reshaped, put to grade, sidewalk built. No surface laid 
there on account of sewer being built next year. 

About one-half mile of streets has been resurfaced with tar or 
asphalt mixed stone and gravel. 

Atlantic avenue. Shoulders of this street have been shaped and 
gravel used for filling four times during the year. 

The usual work of patrolling or patching street surfaces has been 
done. About six miles of streets were seal coated in whole or in part. 

Wood block on Humphrey street has caused the department a lot 
of extra work during the year. On August 2, September 10 and Octo- 
ber 3, the street was torn up from the Monument to the Lynn line. In 
all, the blocks have come up ten times since August. This street ought 
to be resurfaced with some kind of pavement suitable for this thorough- 
fare. 

Danvers street bridge. The abutment to this bridge was pointed 
with cement work done by employees of the Boston & Maine Railroad, 
also new fence built. 

Essex street bridge. This bridge has been resurfaced with 3-inch 
hard pine plank, sidewalk with 2-inch hard pine plank and 276 feet of 
guard rail built. 

Crescent street. Sidewalk ledge removed, reshaped, surfaced with 
stone dust. 

Catch basin, Puritan road. Basin built and 12-inch pipe drain laid 
to the beach. 

Catch basin. Cherry street. Basin built and 10-inch pipe drain laid 
to manhole in culvert. 

Manhole, Palmer pond. No work has been done on this drain 
this year. 

Aspen road drain. No work has been done on this drain on ac- 
count of waivers not being signed. 

Humphrey street resurfacing. No work has been done this year. 

Repairs on sidewalks have been done where needed. The following 
amounts of material used: 468 tons of stone dust, 329 loads of gravel, 
82 loads of cinders. Number of loads of sand used for sanding icy side- 
walks and streets, 159. 

Tar concrete sidewalks were repaired at a cost of $1 per yard for 
new work and 65 cents per yard for skim coating. This work was done 
under contract by F. P. Hard of Lynn. Number of yards laid, new 



144 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



819.2, skim coat 1125.5. Some 183 yards of granolithic sidewalks were 
repaired, and 2200 yards of either tarred or asphalt mixed concrete 
sidewalks were laid by the department. 

Four catch basins were retopped and all catch basins in town were 
cleaned at least twice, others oftener where needed. The following 
drain pipe was laid: 6-inch, 12 feet; 10-inch, 94 feet; 12-inch, 24 feet. 

Gutters in all streets have been cleaned when needed and about 
1400 square yards of tar and mixed stone have been laid in gutters to 
prevent washing out. 

Three manholes and 35 driveways were lowered; 195 feet of curb- 
stone reset; 932 feet of new curbstone laid; 770 feet of guard rail fence 
repaired. 

There were 41,710 gallons of asphalt road oil used on the streets 
and 24,543 gallons of road tar and asphalt, same being purchased under 
contract from the Alden Speare's Sons Co. and The Barrett Co. The 
prices paid w^ere: Cold patch delivered at town yard and put in barrels, 
$.147; 45 or 65 per cent asphalt road oil applied, $.0459. All oil applied 
to the streets were covered with sand. Price of sand delivered at town 
yard, $1.25; teamed by the town trucks, $.90 per ton. 

The amount spent for repairs on wood block pavement on 
Humphrey street, from Lynn line to Blaney street, was about $750; 
Blaney street to Fish House, $60. 

Repairs on equipment. New bodies have been built on two 2-horse 
carts and one single cart. There has been erected one new combination 
building stable and garage on land owned by the town on State road, 
which seems to fill the needs of the department. 

There has been erected this fall 1200 feet of snow fence on Salem 
street, permission having been given the town from the Tedesco club, 
which I want to thank. 

The working force of the department consists of thirty men who 
report every morning at the town yard. State road. The equipment, in 
good working order, is as follows: Two 5-ton White trucks, one Mead 
Morrison tractor and eight horses and carts. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MICHAEL J. RYAN, 
^ Surveyor of Highways. 



1929] REPORT OF HIGHWAY STABLE COMAIITTEE 145 



Highway Stable Committee 



To the Citizens of Swampscott: 

At the annual town meeting in 1929 it was voted that the sum of 
$17,500 be appropriated for the erection of a stable suitable for the 
needs of the Highway Department in pursuance of plans and specifica- 
tions made by Charles V. Burgess, architect. The same committee 
which had been appointed the previous year, namely, the members of 
the Board of Selectmen, Building Inspector and the Surveyor of High- 
ways, were' authorized to proceed with the work and have completed 
and turned over to the Highway Department a building which is satis- 
factory to the Surveyor of Highways and a credit to the town. 

The building is fully equipped to meet the needs of the department 
for many years. The contract for the erection of the building was 
awarded to C. S. Cunningham & Sons Construction Co. for $15,600. 
Changes which seemed to appeal to the committee as apt to improve 
some minor conditions were authorized, so that the final bill was 
$15,952.60. The architect's fee was $966.90, which with the _ cost of 
insurance and advertising left a small balance which was utilized in 
fitting up the building with lockers, benches and other essentials neces- 
sary to the comfort of the men and which could not ordinarily be 
classed as a part of the building contract. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HOWARD K. GLIDDEN, 
R. WYER GREENE, 
DANIEL F. KNOWLTON, 
HARRY E. HARDY, 
MICHAEL J. RYAN, 

Stable Committee. 



Park Department 



To the Citizens of Swampscott: 

Herewith is submitted the annual report of the Park Commissioners 
for the year ending December 31, 1929. The board organized with the 
choice of Archibald Miller, chairman, and Stuart P. Ellis, secretary. 

Monument Avenue Parkway 

The usual necessary care and attention was given this area during 
the year. In response to the requests of several citizens the Board has 
planted a specimen blue spruce near Elmwood road. The tree was 
illuminated in the Christmas season, and presented a very handsome 
appearance during that period. It is the wish of the commissioners 
that automobilists and pedestrians use more care at this park, and avoid 
crossing or trespassing on the grass plots. This causes damage not 
easily repaired, and tends to deface what is otherwise a well kept 
beauty spot. 

Jackson Park 

A large section on the hill was cleared during the early season of an 
undesirable growth, fire breaks were made, and the recently planted 
pines and hemlocks given a better opportunity for growth. A start has 
been made and work will continue the present winter in clearing a space 
in the woods bordering Essex street for the construction of two lawn 
tennis courts. When these are completed they will be prettily located, 
surrounded by pine trees, have good parking space, and will no doubt 
be much enjoyed. 



146 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



The School Department has promised co-operation in the construc- 
tion of a short roadway from the playing field to Burpee road, and this 
should be completed before the fall games. It will be of great value 
in handling automobiles at the football games and will be a start on 
the improvement of the grounds between the Machon school and 
Essex street. 

Abbott Park 

It is expected that a number of concrete benches will be added to 
this park the coming yfear. These will be placed on the north and 
south sides of the field as an extra accommodation, especially for 
skaters. Full use was made of the field the past season by the Junior 
High baseball and football teams, also for High school girls' hockey 
games. Practice and playing dates often conflict, and it is apparent 
that some system will need to be devised, in order that each* team may 
be free to use the grounds. 

Blaney Beach Reservation 

The largest number of bathers ever to use this beach came last 
summer. Excellent temperature conditions, and the cleanly condition 
in which the beach was kept, made it very enjoyable for visitors. The 
diving raft was improved at small expense by the use of steel drums, 
and with good care it should be serviceable for several more seasons. 
A thirty-day clock was installed on the sea wall and proved a valuable 
feature, especially for children. The time is approaching when it will 
be necessary to provide better toilet facilities at this point. The present 
rooms have been in use thirty-three years and have long since proved 
insufficient for the accommodation of the people. We do not make any 
recommendation at this time, but the matter should be given serious 
consideration by the townspeople. 

Phillips Park 

The commissioners had the opportunity in January to secure a 
large amount of loam at a very moderate price per yard. This was 
spread and seeded early in the spring, and a large area was thus added 
to the playing field. The baseball diamond was completed and for the 
first time at this park there is a first class baseball field, well graded, 
and with ample space for games and spectators. In the late fall the field 
was used by the St. John's Junior High football team, also by the 
Junior High girls' hockey players. Goal posts were erected for their 
use and full advantage w^as taken of the large outfield by the players. 

Work is progressing in the direction of providing a large ice hockey 
rink, further removed from the street than the one now in use. It is 
hoped this will be ready for use next winter, so that the original rink 
may be used as a safe skating place for children. The board made ar- 
rangements for securing the ashes and material collected by the Health 
Department, and all loads collected east of Blaney street are now being 
spread in the park. The best of this material is being used as the base 
for tennis courts, which may be completed the coming year. 

Street Intersection Plots 

All of these plots have been cared for the past year. A decided im- 
provement was made late in the fall at the junction of Cherry and Essex 
streets, where a sizable amount of land was curbed and graded by the 
town. This will require considerable labor and expense next spring to 
place it in a presentable and permanent condition, and it will then be 
maintained as a credit to the town park system. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ARCHIBALD MILLER, 
STUART P. ELLIS, 
EVERETT P. MUDGE, 
' Park Commissioners. 



1929] REPORT OF MOTH SUPERINTENDENT 147 



Moth Superintendent 



To the Board of Selectmen: 

Gentlemen: — No changes have been made the past year in the 
customary adopted methods of suppression against the moths which 
feed on the foliage of our trees and shrubs. The absence of rain during 
the entire spraying season made the work not only more effective but 
enabled us to completely cover the territory infested satisfactorily, 
which has not been done for a number of years. If such a favorable 
season did not occur occasionally it would be impossible to keep the 
insects Ik check. There has not been a tree defoliated by the gypsy 
moth, satin moth, canker worms, tent caterpillars or any of the less 
economically important leaf feeding insects. 

There were a greater number of fall web worms than ever. They 
appear in September and cannot be controlled by spraying. In instances 
where they were called to the attention of this department they were cut 
off and burned. Not only were they very numerous here, but the whole 
of New England was severely infested. 

The usual winter work was done, cutting brush and creosoting egg 
clusters of the gypsy moth. At this time a start has been made on 
creosoting and the territory covered compares favorably with previous 
years. The moth tax this year was over $2,500. Each year the demand 
for spraying increases and the 4-horse power sprayer was taxed this 
year to its full capacity. It was purchased by the town in 1916. For 
the last three years it has needed many repairs. 

I recommend the appropriation of $1,000 to buy a new power 
sprayer. 

There has been some agitation regarding the tearing down of the 
buildings along the street at the highway stable. One section of these 
structures is used by this department for a locker in which to store 
sprayers, ladders, tools and supplies. If said buildings are to be de- 
stroyed, I recommend the appropriation of $2,500 for a storage and 
workshop building. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EVERETT P. MUDGE, 

Local Moth Superintendent. 



Forest Warden 



To the Board of Selectmen: 

Gentlemen: — The exceedingly dry condition in the woods caused 
by the absence of rain, not only through the summer but late into the 
fall, has had a direct influence toward favoring treacherous and danger- 
ous woods fires, of which there were twenty-nine this year as compared 
to twenty-one in 1928. There has not been such a dry season since 
1921. About an acre in the Foster dam section of the town burned 
underground six days before it was completely extinguished. 

^ At times through the year permits for open air fires were pro- 
hibited by the State fire warden. Two hundred eighty-three perm-its 
were issued, however, for out of door fires in accordance with the law, 
notices of which were posted in all parts of the town calling attention 
to the fact that permits are necessary and all must assist in preventing 
woods fires. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EVERETT P. MUDGE, 

Forest Warden. 



148 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



Tree Warden 



To the Citizens of Swampscott: 

The exceedingly dry season and the severe storm in April were two 
factors doing the most damage to shade trees the past year. However, 
no effects of these weather conditions will be permanent. 

The leaf feeding insects have been controlled by spraying in season. 
The usual leopard moth work has been done and some spraying for 
the cottony maple scale showed satisfactory results. 

Twenty-four trees have been removed because they wfcre dead or 
in an unsafe condition. One hundred one trees have been planted and 
provided with wire tree guards. All old tree guards have been adjusted. 

Low limbs have been removed from trees in all parts of the town 
and a thorough trimming has been given the trees on Atlantic avenue, 
Palmer avenue, Ocean avenue, Bradlee avenue, and a part of Phillips 
avenue. Wounds caused by mechanical injury have been treated. In- 
jury from electric wires has been slight, and there has been no damage 
caused by escaping illuminating gas. 

The trees in the new nursery on the cemetery property have grown 
well in spite of the dry season. There are about 1200 there from three 
to ten feet in height and a number of thousand in the seed beds. Once 
the area is planted the project should at least be self supporting. This 
year it yielded a return of over one hundred trees which were planted 
on the highways. Because of the unexpected amount of rocks encoun- 
tered in the spring, as large an area was not made tillable as was desired 
and I recommend an appropriation of $200 to remove more of the rocks. 
Respectfully submitted, 

EVERETT P. MUDGE, 
Tree Warden. 



1929] REPORT OF TOWN ENGINEER 149 



Town Engineer 



To the Board of Selectmen: 

Gentlemen: — Herewith I submit my seventeenth annual report of 
the service rendered by the Engineering Department for the various 
departments for the year ending December 31, 1929. 

The Engineering Department has had charge of the following lines 
of work: The designing and superintending the construction of all 
drains and sewers; resurfacing of all streets built by contract, together 
with the specifications and estimates for the same; the establishing of 
street lines and grades for curb stones and granolithic sidewalks; all 
data and plans relating to the laying out of private ways for acceptance 
as public streets, and all engineering questions which come before the 
boards of the several departments. 

Sewer and Drains 

The sewer system of this town has been extended for a distance of 
12,815 feet at a cost of $68,003.06; 88 per cent, being in the section 
known as Beach Bluff. Fourteen years ago the eastern intercepting 
sewer was begun to relieve the unsanitary conditions which existed in 
this district, therefore it is now possible to connect the unsewered 
streets with this trunk line, thereby obtaining the desired results which 
the citizens demand. 

King's Brook, between Superior street and Essex street, has been 
enclosed in a 30-inch and 39-inch pipe culvert at a cost of $13,544.24. 

As all brooks are the main outlets for the street drainage, their flow 
should be on a true grade, unobstructed to the ocean. 

Several minor drains were constructed, the total cost being about 
$4000. 

Continuous Sidewalks 

Lines and grades have been given on the streets, as designated by 
the Board of Selectmen, for the laying of 668 feet of curb stones, 1177.5 
square yards of granolithic sidewalks and 3548.7 square feet of parking. 

Cemetery 

The grading of a portion of the cemetery has been completed and 
the area prepared for burial purposes is 4674 squai;e feet, which is 
divided into thirty-five lots. 

Resurfacing Roadways 

The following streets have been resurfaced with a permanent pave- 
ment, constructed under the Massachusetts Highway specifications and 
penetrated with lake asphalt, namely: Franklin avenue from the State 
road to Stetson avenue, a distance of 1200 feet; Monument avenue and 
Walker road from Humphrey street to the Boston and Maine Railroad, 
a distance of 3000 feet. The total cost being $31,763.30. 

Assessors' Department 

The yearly routine work necessary to bring the plans and card index 
up to date has been completed for this department. 

Selectmen's Department 

Data and estimates have been furnished for this department and 
plans submitted for their approval. 

At the request of property owners, street lines and grades have 
been given from time to time for the grading of lawns, building 
walls, etc. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. W. PRATT, 
Town Engineer. 



150 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



Sealer of Weights and Measures 



To the Board of Selectmen: 

Gentlemen: — I herewith submit my report from January 1, 1929, to 
December 31, 1929. 

This department tested, sealed or condemned all the various meas- 
uring devices and records made thereof, the summary of which is as 
follows: 











r\v\ — 




Adjusted 


Sealed 


Sealed 


demne 


Platform scales over 5000 lbs. 


1 


7 








Jrlatiorm scales under 5000 lbs. 


10 


1 o 

18 








Counter scales over 100 lbs. 


1 


3 








Counter scales under 100 lbs. 


11 


39 


2 





Beam scales over 100 lbs. 





3 








Beam scales under 100 lbs. 





1 








Spring scales over 100 lbs. 


1 


4 








Spring scales under 100 lbs. 


11 


35 





1 


Computing scales under 100 lbs. 


4 


25 





3 


Personal scales 





8 





1 


Prescription scales 


3 


4 








Avoirdupois weights 


30 


242 





5 


Apothecary weights 


6 


56 





6 


Metric weights 





31 








Liquid measures 





70 








Dry measures 





5 





4 


Gasoline measuring pumps 


7 


54 





6 


Quantity measures on pumps 


78 


271 








Yard sticks 





1 








Total 


163 


877 


2 


26 



Trial Weighing 



Bread 
Butter 
Coal in bags 
Confectionery 
Dry commodities 
Flour 

Fruits and vegetables 
Meats and provisions 

Total 

This department made during the year 3,082 inspections and 111 
tests with very good results. Complaints investigated were satisfac- 
torily adjusted. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. WALTER BURRILL, 

Sealer of Weights and Measures^ 



Number 


Number 






Tested 


Correct 


Under 


Over 


286 


286 








310 


310 








200 


196 


2 


2 


518 


518 








677 


673 


4 





272 


270 


2 





393 


362 





31 


53 


53 








2709 


2668 


8 


33 



1929] 



REPORT OF BOARD OF APPEALS 

Board of Appeals 



151 



During the six months ending June 6, 1929, four petitions were 
heard, of which one was granted and three denied. The following is the 
resume of these hearings: 



Petition 

To place the main wall of a pro- 
posed cottage house at 132 Green- 
wood avenue, 15 feet from the 
street line. Decision: Denied. 

Mar. 11 Genaveffa Gallo To build a sun-porch at 42 Orient 

court within 5 feet of the street 
line. Decision: Denied. 



Date Petitioner 
Feb. 11 Fred Marino 



May 13 Solomon Gross To permit the use of the entire 

area, 36,900 sq. ft., at 22-34 Essex 
street, for business so as to allow 
the building of a 100-car garage on 
said lot. Decision: Denied. 



May 13 William H. Carroll Appeal from the decision of the 

Board of Selectmen denying him a 
petition under Article V of the zon- 
ing by-laws to add to and enlarge 
the existing building at 148 Burrill 
street and to use the said addition 
and enlargement for the purpose 
for which the original building is 
being used under the zoning by- 
laws. Decision: Granted. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE M. GLIDDEN, Chairman. 
WILLIAM O. TITCOMB. 
CLARENCE E. CAHILL. 
CHARLES W. MOWRY. 



On Tuesday, June 4, 1929, the Board of Selectmen re-appointed 
George M. Glidden, Clarence E. Cahill and William O. Titcomb as 
members of the Board, Charles W. Mowry having declined further 
service for business reasons. Thomas S. Bubier and Clarence B. Delano 
were appointed to fill vacancies for the term ending June 6, 1930. Mr. 
Delano declined to serve and Ralph Maxwell was appointed to fill the 
vacancy. On October 25, 1929, Clarence E. Cahill, who had been a 
member of the Board for the past three years, resigned, owing to 
removal from town. 

During the six months ending December 31, 1929, ten petitions 
were heard of which seven were granted, two denied and one un- 
decided. The following is the resume of these hearings. 



152 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



Petition 

To enlarge garage at 17 Northern 
avenue from a one-car to a two-car 
garage to be built within 12 feet of 
street line, the same as the original 
building. Decision: Granted. 

To build house nearer than 20 feet 
from the street line so as to allow 
the garage to be built in the rear. 
Decision: Denied. 

To build a piazza on the front of 
house, 16 Essex street, to come 6 
feet within the set-back area. Deci- 
sion: Granted, the overhang of the 
piazza to be allowed to come not 
less than 4 feet from the street line. 

July 8, 'the board voted to reopen the petition of Genaveffa Gallo 
for presentation of such further and additional facts relating thereto as 
the petitioner might be able to adduce. 

On July 22, the petition was again heard and on the presentation 
of new evidence, the board ordered that the prayer of the petitioner be 
granted and that she be permitted to build a sun porch within 5 feet 
9 inches of the street line. 

Aug. 12 Cora E. Pitman To build a 7-foot piazza on front 

of house at 12 Ryan place. Deci- 
sion: Granted, piazza to be 7 feet, 
the overhang not to exceed 8 inches. 



Date Petitioner 
June 10 Perley E. Randall 



June 24 E. R. Spinney 



June 24 Mary E. W. Nichols 



On September 9, the board received a petition from Fred Marino 
for reopening the hearing held February 11. This petition was denied 
without prejudice or determination on the merits of matter alleged in 
the petition. It having been the opinion of the board that the petition 
contained new^ matter and, therefore, should come before the board in 
the form of a new petition, a new petition was filed and hearing held 
on September 23. 

After a further hearing it appeared that a hardship has been created 
and that to require the petitioner to place the building in question on 
the lot so that the front line thereof would conform with the set-back 
distance established in Article IV would involve practical diflficulty and 
unnecessary hardship. Decision: Petition granted. 

Date Petitioner Petition 

Sept. 23 Wm. F. & Laura E. Healy To build a sun porch at 32 Bristol 

avenue within the set-back area. 
Decision: Granted, the sun porch to 
come not nearer than 6 feet from 
the street line. 



Sept. 23 Katherine L. Keefe 



Oct. 14 Edward LaCroix 



To use the premises at the junction 
of the railroad and Essex street near 
Essex street bridge for business 
purposes. Decision: Denied. 

To build an addition to his garage 
which is already in the set-back 
area, having been built previous to 
the adoption of the zoning by-law. 
Decision: Granted, garage to be al- 
lowed to come within six feet of the 
street line. 



1929] 



REPORT OF TOWN COUNSEL 



153 



Dec. 23 Geo. S. Briggs Coal Co. That the application of zoning by- 
law may be varied by changing two 
parcels of land on Columbia street 
from residential to business area. 
Hearing was held upon this date, 
but on the date of this report, De- 
cember 31, 1929, no decision has 
been made. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE M. GLIDDEN, Chairman. 
WILLIAM O TITCOMB. 
THOMAS S. BUBIER. 
RALPH MAXWELL. 



Town Counsel 



Board of Selectmen: 

Gentlemen: — My report for 1929 follows: 

There has been, during the year, the usual amount of litigation, 
hearings, opinions to town officers and departments. 

A question of more than ordinary interest is that which has arisen 
with respect to the enforcement of the town's zoning by-laws. The 
by-laws were adopted by town meeting in 1924. They divided the town 
into zones, restricted new building for stores and other business to 
certain areas, and limited the greater part of the town to residences. 
The property lying along the south side of Humphrey street from the 
post office block to Blaney Beach was zoned as residential. 

In August, 1928, the building inspector granted a permit to erect 
a business structure, namely a hotel, in this area. The permit was 
contrary to the provisions of the by-law the town had adopted and was, 
of course, a challenge to the validity of the by-law. It at once became 
the duty of the Board of Selectmen to determine whether as town 
ofificials they were bound to support the by-law. By majority vote the 
law department was instructed to endeavor to uphold the ijy-law by 
appropriate legal action. This action took the form of a bill in equity 
and petition for mandamus, in effect asking the court to annul the 
building permit already issued. 

The corporation holding the permit, the building inspector and 
intervening land owners affected, defended the permit by questioning 
the constitutionality of the by-law. The constitutionality of the by-law 
depends upon whether it is based upon or has a substantial relation to 
public welfare. A master appointed by the court to find the facts filed 
a report in which he expressed an opinion that in so far as the by-law 
restricted this particular locus, the Knowlton and Bray properties, to 
residences, it was not based on public health, safety, protection or 
welfare. The master's report was heard before a single justice who 
confirmed it and dismissed the proceeding. Appeal was taken by the 
town and the issue will now be passed on by the full bench of the 
Supreme Judicial Court for the Commonwealth. The question is of 
importance both to the parties privately concerned and to the town, and 
interesting results with respect to zoning in Swampscott may follow 
Its final determination. 



154 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



The only immediate and direct effect, however, of a decision against 
the town in this case, Swampscott v. Knowlton Arms, Inc., and others, 
would be to hold valid a building permit for a hotel. It would seem 
that this result would not be broad enough to satisfy parties at interest. 
On Nov. 6, 1929, a bill in equity against the town was brought by Daniel 
F. Knowlton, Edmund F. Knowlton, Charles F. Knowlton, Nellie K. 
Widger and Harriet F. Knowlton in which they seek: 

(1) A mandatory injunction directing the defendant town to 
permit the plaintiffs or their grantee to erect any lawful building upon 
said tract, disregarding the provisions of the zoning by-law. 

(2) That the zoning by-law be held to be invalid in its specific 
application to the plaintiffs' land. 

The effect of this suit, if the plaintiffs are successful, would be to 
throw open this land to any business development, without restriction. 
It also would be likely to have a similar effect on other land, now resi- 
dential, along the shore and in this vicinity. 

Thus the pending litigation has important possibilities in its effect 
on the zoning of the entire town. Swampscott, of course, is not the 
only town in which zoning questions have gone to court. The subject 
is comparatively new. 

The litigation has not been expensive. Over and above the ordinary 
cost of this department it has involved an expense to date of $165 for 
printing and $48.65 for service of process, entry and witness fees. 

Respectfully submitted, 

H. D. LINSCOTT, 
Town Counsel. 



1929] REPORT OF STANLEY SCHOOL BLDG. COM. 

Stanley School Building Committee 



155 



In accordance with the vote of the town, January 16, 1929, we 
report the proceedings of this committee as follows: 

January 26, 1929. The initial meeting. The first official action was 
recognition of public sentiment in the school district as exemplified in 
a petition signed by sixty mothers and one hundred and thirty-one 
school children calling attention to the "love and esteem" held for "Miss 
Louise C. Stanley for many years teacher and principal of the Palmer 
School." The committee accordingly assumed the name Stanley School 
Building Committee and the new building has been so designated and 
marked. 

February 23, 1929. The firm of Kilham, Hopkins & Greeley was 
chosen as architects of the proposed building. 

March 9, 1929. The committee approved the plans submitted. 

May 4, 1929. After the necessary advertising, the contract for 
building was awarded C. S. Cunningham & Sons Construction Co. 

May 8, 1929. Construction work started. 

December 19, 1929. The committee, in session at the new building, 
formally voted acceptance from the contractor. 

December 30, 1929. With the furnishing practically complete the 
committee in its turn surrendered the building to the School Com- 
mittee, which accepted control as of that date. 

We believe that as above recorded we have completed the work 
called for by the town vote. The schoolhouse has been erected, fur- 
nished, and has been in use by the pupils since January 2, 1930. There 
seems to be no necessity of any financial statement here, as such would 
be but a repetition of the report of the town accountant in this respect. 
We state that all of the work has been done within the appropriation. 
All bills in connection with the work performed or materials purchased 
have been duly approved and forwarded to the town accountant, except 

(a) A Coppus blower (in process of installation) $425.00 

(b) Additional cement waterproofing $130.00 
There is a provision in the contract for landscaping the school 

grounds (the work having been completed) whereby 25 per cent, of 
the amount payable is contingent upon approval by this committee next 
May that the town's interest be suitably protected. 

^ Now comes the personal record of our activities which should be 
of interest to our fellow citizens and of possible future value to some 
of them if this is of record in a town report. 

As a committee we never before built a schoolhouse. Any similar 
committee will probably be composed of townsfolk with similar lack 
of experience. (The other members of the committee wish to testify 
here to the great value of Mr. Hardy's expert advice in our joint under- 
taking.) The committee has necessarily held frequent meetings. We 
went out of town, together and individually, to inspect the work of 
competing architects. We were familiar with the conditions existing 
at the Palmer School which the new building was to supplant. The 
old school was overcrowded, with antiquated toilet facilities, unsatis- 
factory ventilation and other defects, all of which were to be corrected 
in the new school. If a policy was not verbally expressed at the outset 
it is apparent now that we have been following a very definite policy 
from^ the beginning, to wit: The selection, in our opinion, of the best 
architectural guidance and permitting the greatest possible freedom of 
action to our architectural advisor. 



156 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



The appropriation ($115,000.00) has been sufficient. The new 
school has a hip-roof with slate shingles, one more expensive than the 
factory-type flat roof, but more in keeping with the surroundings, less 
expensive in future maintenance. Provision has been made for future 
enlargement at minimum cost, with space allowance in the boiler room 
for the additional heating apparatus. The school room and corridor 
floors are heavy linoleum with more peace and quiet for teacher and 
pupil than the ordinary wood flooring permits. Ample toilet accommo- 
dations on each floor are available; tiled throughout, airy, accessible, 
easy to keep clean, and hot water always available through connection 
with the heating system. The boiler room was blasted from solid ledge 
and is a complete concrete unit — walls, ceiling and floor. 

There is a teachers' room, a principal's office, a clinic room, each 
with toilet and lavatory and suitably furnished. All plumbing fixtures 
are chrome-finished. The school rooms are decorated in separate color 
schemes, and ventilated each as a unit under the control of the teacher. 
All parts of the building are connected by an intercommunicating 'phone 
system. The auditorium is simple in design, and the committee has 
always had in mind the idea that it would be used for and by the chil- 
dren, with a stage for their entertainments. It is the assembly hall for 
the school, a play-room, a place for recess on stormy days, also an 
auditorium for the formal dignity of grown-ups. There is no basement 
as we adults remember the word — no occasion for children to go below 
stairs where the janitor has his quarters near the heating apparatus. 

We wish to express here our appreciation of the co-operation of 
the town officials. 

This is a brief summary of the result of our efforts, and for your 
consideration our record is herewith 

Respectfully submitted, 

ARTHUR M. WYMAN, Chairman 

(Member of the School Committee) 
DANIEL F. KNOWLTON, Secretary 
(Member of the Board of Selectmen) 
JOHN A. WALDO, 

(Member of the Finance Committee) 
HARRY E. HARDY, 
(Building Inspector) 
RALPH H. NUTTER, 
(One voter of the town). 



1929] REPORT OF BOARD OF SELECTMEN 157 



Board of Selectmen 



To the Citizens of Swampscott: 

The Board of Selectmen submits herewith its annual report for 
the year 1929 together with the reports of all other officers, boards and 
committees submitted in accordance with the By-Laws. There is also 
appended the budget of appropriations asked for, for the conduct of the 
various departments during the year 1930. 

Grade Crossing Warning Signals 

As forecasted in the 1928 report the board received an application 
from the Boston & Maine Railroad for the approval of its request to 
the Department of Public Utilities for permission to do away with the 
gates and crossing tender at the Humphrey street railroad crossing at 
Phillips Beach. This the board declined to give, feeling as it did, in 
common with the majority of the residents of the section, that to leave 
the crossing unprotected except for the lights would endanger the lives 
of the large number of school children on their way to the Palmer 
School and to the new Stanley School. 

The gates have been so long established at this point that it was 
the opinion of the board that the town would be sacrificing too much 
in the interest of economy of railroad operation to allow the plan to be 
carried through without strenuous protest. Late in the year the board 
was notified that the railroad had made formal application to the De- 
partment of Public Utilities for the requisite permission. A hearing 
was held at the State House on January 16, 1930, and at this hearing 
the town's protest was presented by Town Counsel Harry D. Linscott 
and two members of the board. They were ably assisted by the Super- 
intendent of Schools and the Principal of the Stanley School, who pre- 
sented facts and figures in support of the protest. The decision of the 
department has not yet been made. 

Caring for Police Prisoners 

In accordance with the vote of the town the Selectmen made 
arrangements with the Mayor of the City of Lynn to care for prisoners 
who might be taken to the Lynn lockup, by agreeing to pay to the city 
the sum of one hundred dollars ($100) per year. This amount was paid 
into the City Treasury upon receipt of a bill dated Sept. 21 for "Use of 
jail and care of prisoners from Jan. 1, 1929, to Dec. 31, 1929," and the 
board has included in its budget for 1930 a similar amount to be used 
for the same purpose. 

Town Hall Vault 

During the year there has been built as an addition to the 'town hall 
a vault adjoining the oflfices of the Town Treasurer, Town Clerk and 
Collector of Taxes, providing fireproof storage for their valuable papers. 
The vault is divided by steel partitions with access from the two offices 
to the portion assigned to the officers named. The lower part of the 
vault is given over to the Town Engineer for the storage of the many 
valuable plans in his possession, entrance to this part being from the 
rear hall. The vault was constructed by E. C. Blanchard Co., under 
the direction of Architect Charles V. Burgess, as voted by the town. 
Each of the compartments has been fitted with steel shelves as required 
by law. 



158 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



Whitman Road 

In order to provide access to the new Stanley School from Orchard 
road, a road was laid out by the town and has been named Whitman 
road, in honor of Willard M. Whitman, for many years Superintendent 
of Schools of Swampscott. In order that the building of the school 
might not be interfered with, the work of laying a sewer, water pipes 
and underground conduits was delayed until late in the year, as the 
street required a great deal of blasting. In consequence the final sur- 
facing of the street was postponed until the spring of 1930. Ample 
opportunity to reach the new building was, however, provided. Curb- 
stones were laid on the westerly side of Orchard road up to the school 
lot, and next year it is planned to lay a granolithic sidewalk where 
these curbs were laid. 

Tercentenary 

As its part of the observance of the Tercentenary of the City of 
Lynn of which Swampscott was originally a part, the town, through its 
Tercentenary Committee and the school authorities, provided three 
floats, showing the seal of the town, the Ingalls tannery and the outdoor 
activities w^hich the children enjoy. 

A Distinguished Visitor 

During the celebration of the Tercentenary the town was graced by 
the presence of Marchioness Gladys Townshend of Raynham Hall, 
Mayor of King's Lynn, England, who with her son, Marquis George, 
was domiciled at the New Ocean House. Her Ladyship produced a 
lasting impression upon all with whom she came in contact by the 
■graciousness of her manner, especially toward the children, and her 
amiable consideration of those about her. The board feels that she 
will alwaj^s be a welcome guest in the town of Swampscott. 

Ramsdell Square 

As a further memorial of the Tercentenary of the town, the board 
co-operated with Old Essex Chapter of the Sons of the American 
Revolution in dedicating a memorial tablet in honor of Abednego 
Ramsdell, the first soldier of the Revolution from Swampscott to be 
killed at the Battle of Lexington. Young Ramsdell lived in the vicinity 
of Essex and Cherry streets, and it seemed eminenth^ fitting to name 
this square in his honor. The S. A. R. organization provided the tablet 
and the various town departments, notably the Surveyor of Highways, 
Park Commission, Town Engineer and Selectmen, co-operated in 
making a*plot at the junction of the two streets which will alwaj^s be 
an attractive setting for the boulder and tablet. The tablet was appro- 
priately dedicated b}^ the Sons of the American Revolution on the 
afternoon of December 4. 

Traffic Signals 

As required by the Department of Public Works of the State the 
board installed another traffic light on Humphrey street, governing the 
entrance of vehicles to the main thoroughfare from Blaney street. In 
the spring another signal light will be installed governing the entrance 
from Ingalls terrace. 

A so-called "McLean Lite" has been installed at the junction of 
Burrill and Essex streets. This signal, which is of the flashing type, 
has been on trial for the past three months and decision as to whether 
it meets the requirements or the claims of its makers will be deter- 
mined soon after the close of the year. 

New Committee Room 

A new room has been constructed on the second floor out of what 
was formerly used as a storage room for scenery and furniture, thus 
providing not only a committee room for the use of the finance com- 



1929] REPORT OF BOARD OF SELECTMEN 159 



mittee, which heretofore has met in the office of the Water and Sewer- 
age Board, subject to the use of the same by that board and therefore 
precluding any Friday night sessions. The new room also serves as a 
commodious hearing room for the Selectmen, Board of Appeals or 
othef^boards and committees having occasion to hold hearings at which 
thirty or more people might be expected. The room has already proved 
its value. At the outset it seemed wise to restrict the use of this room 
to town business, and it has been used for no other purpose. 

Unlighted Parking 

Chapter 43 of the Acts of 1929, effective May 15, provided "that 
an automobile need display no light when parked within the limits of a 
way in a space in which unlighted parking is permitted by the rules or 
regulations of the board or officer having control of such way." Prior 
to the effective date of this new law the matter was discussed with the 
Chief of Police, who was requested to study the situation and report. 
He reported "that after careful study of the situation he could not see 
how lightless parking will benefit any Swampscott citizen, but on the 
other hand it will be very dangerous." It was, therefore, voted by the 
board to leave the matter as it is without change, the idea being not 
to allow parking without lights on any street in Swampscott. 

Standard Oil Company Extension 

During 1928 the Standard Oil Company expressed a desire to in- 
crease its storage capacity on Columbia street by the demolition of 
certain tanks and the. erection of new ones. A public hearing was held, 
at which strong opposition was expressed. The matter was taken under 
advisement without prejudice. This year the company pressed for a 
decision and the board definitely decided not to grant any extension, 
but with the proviso that if any of the tanks are in need of repairs a 
permit will be granted to replace that tank with one of similar capacity. 

L5mn Sand and Stone Co. 

On April 26, the board held a conference with residents in the 
vicinity of the Lynn Sand and Stone Company relative to blasting and 
the board instructed the Chief of Police to make an investigation and 
report at the next meeting of the board. 

The following Tuesday, conference was held at which the Chief 
of Police, Chief of the Fire Department and Town Counsel were present 
and the following letter, signed by all the members of the board, was 
sent to George C. Neal, State Fire Marshal, at the State House, Boston: 

"The Board of Selectmen of Swampscott wish at this time to 
present to you our formal protest against the continuance of the blast- 
ing operations of the Lynn Sand and Stone Company. It has become 
an intense nuisance to many residents of the town. 

"We are also forwarding to you new evidence of recent blasts. 
We call this to your attention, that you may take immediate action." 

On May 10, the board received a letter from the State Fire Marshal 
acknowledging receipt of the board's protest and stating that he is 
preparing to take some decided action on the matter and has sent to 
the company for a statement of the number of blasts since Dec. 1, and 
the amount of dynamite used in each of said blasts. 

Nothing further having been heard from the State Fire Marshal, 
on September 27 it was unanimously voted that the Town Counsel be 
authorized to take whatever action he deems necessary to stop the 
Lynn Sand and Stone Company from continuing business in the town 
of Swampscott. 

On October 4 conference was held with the Town Counsel and 
Representative Harry E. Day of Salem relative to the action to be 
taken against the company. 



160 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



On October 11, the Town Counsel submitted the petition which 
he had drafted against the company in accordance with the instructions 
of the board and stated that he had brought proceedings against the 
company and the petition was signed by the board. 

This petition together with a petition prepared by the Attorney 
General was referred to a master and is still in his hands. 



ADMINISTRATIVE 
Bonds of Town Officers 

Bonds of the following officers are given by the American Surety 
Co., of New York, in the amounts stated: 

James W. Libby, Town Treasurer $46,000.00 

Ralph D. Merritt, Collector of Taxes 46,000.00 

The above amounts are set b}'- the State. 

Ralph D. Merritt, Town Clerk 1,000.00 

Ralph D. Merritt, Collector of Water Rates 5,000.00 

James W. Libby, Custodian of Trust Funds 10,000.00 



Licenses 

Auctioneer 

Fred A. Hale, 48 Crossman avenue. 

Clifford E. Myers, 61 Morton road 
Bowling Alley 

James D. Bentley, 217 Burrill street. 
Express 

John A. Boston, 65 Pine street. 
Eben P. Brown, 39 Mugford street, Marblehead. 
Willis E. Shephard, 645 Humphrey street, with Sunday privilege. 
William H. Carroll, 148 Burrill street, with Sunday privilege. 
Joseph W. Bruley, 26 Purftan road. 
L. Charles Corrain, 21 Superior street. 
William A. Dunham, 125 Stetson avenue. 
Harvey H. Beadle, 69 Stetson avenue. 
Swampscott Transportation Co., 29 Suffolk avenue. 
Thorner's Express, Marblehead. 
Millard A. Roberts, 53 Lawton avenue, Lynn. 
Emilio larrobino, 670 Humphrey street. 
Eben P. Brown, 39 Mugford street, Marblehead. 
Thomas C. Borden, 18 Eastman avenue. 
E. G. Bean, 430 Humphrey street. 
Common Victualers 

Grant's Cafe, Geo. F. and John S. Grant, 60 and 408-410 Humphrey 
street. 

Blaisdell Confectionery Co., 131 Humphrey street. 

Burrill Street Pharmacy, 205 Burrill street. 

Lillian A. Little, Sunbeam Inn and 1001 State road. 

Robert B. Hegarty, corner Essex street and Eastman avenue. 

Johnny's Lunch, 422 Humphrey street. 

Fleming & Co., Inc., Freight Yard. 

Edith Rabinowitz, 156 Humphrey street. 

Fred M. Eichel, 17 Railroad avenue. 

M. Anita Grover, 1008 State road. 

George H. Eaton, 416 Humphrey street. 

St. Clair's, Inc., 146 Humphrey street. 

Lillian A. Little, General Glover Farm Tea House, Salem and Tedes- 

co streets. 
Nellie A. Carey, 1016 State road. 

Bell-In-Hand, Bruno D. Himberg, 1 Marshall street. 
Harold C. Blaney, 155 Humphrey street. 



1929] REPORT OF BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



161 



Innholders 

John N. LeVine, Deer Cove Inn, 747 Humphrey street. 
Bert K. Filer, The Arkaven, 80 Humphrey street. 

Antonio and Leila Tuttle Squillari, Hotel Bellevue, 1092 Humphrey 
street. 

Catherine J. Wade, Prescott-Clif¥, 175 Humphrey street. 

E. R. Grabow, Hotel Preston, North Stone road. 

Morris Sherin, Sherin House, 28 Claremont terrace. 

George Roch, King's Beach Inn, 80 Humphrey street. 

New Ocean House, Inc., 208 Puritan road. 
Junk Dealers 

Jacob Goldberg, 26 Elm place. 

Nathan E. Zletz, 91 Eastman avenue. 

Louis Zletz, 26 Cherry street. 
Intelligence Office 

Pauline M. Robinson, 99 Paradise road. 
Hawkers and Peddlers 

Speros Kolatsonis, Lynn. 
Used Car Dealers 

William Welch, Oceanside Garage, 12 Pine street. 

Pool Table 

James D. Bentley, 217 Burrill street. 

Joseph F. Crowell, Jr., 424 Humphrey street. 
Taxi 

William H. Carroll, 148 Burrill street. 
Joseph W. Bruley, 26 Puritan road. 

Harry A. Tirrell, Burrill Street Garage, 145 Burrill street. 
John E. Burns, 489 Humphrey street. 



The following permits to sell materials to and to do work for the 
town have been granted to town officials under Section 4, Chapter 5, 
of the town By-Laws: 



During the year the Board of Survey has approved the following 
plans: Bates road, Charlotte road and Muriel road. 



Permits 



Dr. Howard K. Glidden 
Horace R. Parker 
Dr. Loring Grimes 
Archibald Miller 
Everett P. Mudge 
John B. Cahoon 
John B. Earp 
Howard L. Hamill 
Frank G. Melvin 
George J. Place 
L. Herbert Cahoolti 
Albert Enholm 
Arthur M. Wyman 
James M. Kennedy 
Charles Connell 
Frank T. Roach 
John P. Costin 
George D. Horton 
James T. Jordan 
Pearl F. Davis 
Barbara M, Lewis 
C. Walter Burrill 



Daniel F. Knowlton 
Clarence B. Humphrey 
George D. R. Durkee 
Stuart P. Ellis 
Harry E. Cahoon 
Harold H. Bartol 
Ralph D. Merritt 
Clarence W. Horton 
Willis E. Shephard 
Frank H. Bradford 
Walter F. Reeves 
Dr. G. J. Esselen, Jr. 
Eugene P. Brogan 
J. Henry Pedrick 
Almon B. Owens 
Samuel Hooper 
Joseph L. Shanahan 
Francis P. Wall 
Herbert F. Frazier 
Margaret M. Carroll 
Mary K. Hammond 



Board of Survey 



162 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



THE TOWN BUDGET 

The following are the amounts requested by the various officers, 
boards and committees for the conduct of their departments during the 
year 1930: 



General Government 



Legislative 


d>c cr> (\(\ 


Selectmen 


0,/UU.UU 


Splprtmpn'*? Continp'pnf T^iind 

»^ A LXll V^ll J V^Wi i L 1 ilg Xi L X UilVJ, 


1 500 00 


Accounting 


2,650.00 


Treasury 


2,353.00 


Certification of Notes and Bonds 


1,000.00 


Collector of Taxes 


3,479.50 


Assessors 


5,200.00 


Town Clerk 


866.00 


Election and Registration 


3,103.00 


Engineering 


7,000.00 


Town Hall 


4,300.00 


Town Hall Repairs 


3,000.00 


Law 


2,000.00 


Board of Appeals 


250.00 



$40,951.50 



Protection of Persons and Property 

Police $35,971.50 

Fire 39,840.00 

Moth 4,673.00 

Tree Warden 3,550.00 

Forest Warden 200.00 

Inspector of Buildings 1,250.00 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 555.00 



86,039.50 



Health and Sanitation 



Health 

Dental Clinic 
Health Nurse 
Cleaning Beaches 
Refuse and Garbage 
Health Dumps 
Sewer 

Particular Sewers 
Brooks 



9,220.00 
1,200.00 
1,350.00 
1,250.00 

12,865.00 
1,700.00 

10,365.00 
1,000.00 
500.00 



39,450.00 



Highway Administration 
Highway 

New Construction 
Seal Coating 
Street Construction 
Street Watering and Oiling 
Sidewalks and Curbing 
Snow and Ice 
New Equipment 
Continuous Sidewalks 
Lighting Streets 



Highways 



2,900.00 
47,050.00 
20,000.00 
5,000.00 
3,000.00 
5,000.00 
4.000.00 
6,000.00 
5,300.00 
10,000.00 
24,302.00 



132,552.00 



Amount carried forward 



$298,993.00 



1929] 



REPORT OF BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



163 



Amount brought forward 



$298,993.00 



Charities 



Public Welfare 
Soldiers' Relief 
State Aid 
Military Aid 
Pensions 
Burnett Fund 
Overdraft 



Schools and Libraries 



Maintenance 
Library 



of Schools 



11,000.00 
7,000.00 
500.00 
480.00 
5,677.80 
132.00 
261.77 



177,785.00 
10,525.00 



Recreation and Unclassified 

Parks 

Subordinate Officials 
Memorial Day 
Firemen's Memorial Day 
Heat and Light, G. A. R. Hall 
Heat and Light, V. F. W. Hall 
District Nurse 
Legion Lease 

Trust Fund Custodian's Bond 

Reserve Fund 

Printing Town Reports 

Insurance 

Care of Prisoners 

Veterans' Exemption 

Unpaid Bills 



,500.00 
630.00 
500.00 
200.00 
550.00 
200.00 
300.00 
,350.00 
40.00 
,000.00 
,266.55 
,404.07 
100.00 
50.00 
,582.86 



Water 
Cemetery 



Enterprises 



60,113.75 
4,678.00 



Interest and Maturing Debt 

Interest: 

Loans in Anticipation of Revenue 10,000.00 

General Debt 22,324.75 

Sewer Bonds 5,906.50 

T. B. Hospital Bonds 1,800.00 



Municipal Indebtedness: 
General Debt 
Sewer Bonds 
T. B. Hospital Bonds 

County of Essex: 

Essex Sanatorium Assessment 
T. B. Hospital Addition 



46,443.45 
14,850.00 
4,000.00 



5,587.89 
3,615.64 



Emergency Sewer 
Emergency Water 

Total 



25,051.57 



188,310.00 



27,673.48 



64,791.75 



40,031.25 



65,293.45 



9,203.53 

1,500.00 
2,500.00 

$723,348.03 

Respectfully submitted, 

HOWARD K. GLIDDEN, 
R. WYER GREENE, 
DANIEL F. KNOWLTON, 

Board of Selectmen. 



164 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



The Board of Assessors 



To the Citizens of Swampscott: 

The Board of Assessors submit the following report for the year 
1929. The property in the town assessed by the local assessors April 
1, 1929, amounted to $22,609,112, a decrease over the previous year 
(1928) of $230,194.00. The decrease is caused by taking the automobiles 
from the personal property assessment. They are taxed under the new 
excise tax of this year. 

The real estate valuation April 1, 1929, was $21,592,351, an increase 
over the previous year (1928) of $615,074. The valuation of personal 
estate assessed by the local assessors April 1, 1929, was $1,016,761, a 
decrease over the previous year (1928) of $845,268. 

There was charged on the excise tax on automobiles for the year 
1929, $50,204.43; the valuation of the same, $1,693,166. Allowing for 
abatements, the town will receive double the amount of taxes on autos 
than in 1928, when they were taxed as property. 

The following tables show how the Assessors arrived at the tax 
rate: 

Liabilities, Town of Swampscott, 1929 

Town appropriations to be raised by taxation and receipts $635,815.89 



Over-lay account, 1926 ^ 96.58 

Water appropriations to be raised by water receipts 66,780.00 

State tax 28,305.00 

State enterprises 20,525.82 

County tax 42,960.32 

Over-lay for the abatement of taxes, 1929 4,000.00 



Total liabilities $798,483.61 

Assets, Town of Swampscott, 1929 

Poll taxes $6,108.00 

Property valuation, $22,609,112. ($24 per $1,000) 542,618.63 

Estimated receipts 197,084.28 

Transfer from excess and deficiency 52,672.70 



Total assets $798,483.61 



Assessors* Property Report 

Valuation of the town of Swampscott April 1, 1929. Table of 
aggregate of polls, property and taxes as assessed April 1, 1929: 

Number of persons, partnerships, corporations assessed on 



property 2,945 

Number cf male polls assessed 3,054 

Value of assessed personal estate $1,016,761.00 

Value of assessed buildings, excluding land $14,579,621.00 

Value of assessed land, excluding buildings $7,012,730.00 

Total value of assessed real estate $21,592,351.00 

Total value of assessed estates $22,609,112.00 

Number of horses assessed 35 

Number of cows assessed 5 

Number of dwelling houses assessed 2,582 



1929] REPORT OF BOARD OF ASSESSORS 165 



Taxes for State, County and Town Purposes 



On personal estate $24,402.21 
On real estate 518,216.42 
On polls 6,108.00 



Total $548,726.63 
Rate of tax per $1,000 $24.00 



EDWARD A. MAXFIELD, 
CLARENCE B. HUMPHREY, 
JOHN B. EARP, 

Board of Assessors. 



Statistics of the 



Town of Swampscott, 1887-1929 



ASSESSORS' VALUATION APRIL 1. 


JANUARY 1. 


1 

1 


Real 


Personal 


Total 


Rate 




Net 










Taxes 








Estate 


Property 


Valuation 


per 
$1,000 


O 

{h 


ueuL 


1929 


.?21,592.351 


$1,016,761 


$22,609,112 




$24.00 
24.00 


19o0 


$DU^,DUU.UU 


1928 


20.977,277 


1,862.029 


22,839,306 


1929 


'^i^U \ (Ml 


1927 


20,417,314 


1,877,468 


22,294,782 


26.00 


1928 


iiyo,ouu.uu 


1926 


19, .584. 208 


1.048.254 


21,232,462 


28.00 


1927 


OOo.UUU.UU 


1925 


17,870.147 


1,643,644 


19,513,791 


26.00 


1926 


345.200.00 


1924 


17.088,098 


1.546.498 


18,634.596 


25.00 


1925 


246,900.00 


1923 


16.157.425 


1.526,754 


17,684.179 


26.00 


1924 


291.900.00 


1922 


15,.321.512 


1.414.422 


16,735,934 


25.00 


1 1923 


343.900.00 


1921 


14.226.510 


1,391,298 


15,617,808 


24.00 


1922 


341,500.00 


1920 


14.007.916 


1,316.938 


15,324,854 


23.00 


1921 


344,100.00 


1919 


12.771,170 


1,179,422 


13,950.592 


20.00 


1920 


236,600.00 


1918 


12,619.550 


1,110,776 


13,730,332 


20.00 


1919 


251,750.00 


1917 


12,141,321 


1,000,682 


13.142.300 


20.00 


1 1918 


312,000.00 


1916 


11.532.432 


4,928,181 


16,460,513 


20.00 


1 1917 


330,800.00 


1915 


10.810,305 


5,028,193 


15,838,498 


17.80 


1916 


363,900.00 


1914 


10.508.225 


3,531.119 


14,039.344 


16.80 


1915 


344,100.00 


1913 


10.028,325 


3.174.590 


13.202.915 


16.40 


1914 


293.500.00 


1912 


9,413.525 


2,974,381 


12,387,906 


16.00 


1913 


276,600.00 


1911 


9.050.850 


2,771,167 


11,822.017 


15.00 


1912 


273,150.00 


1910 


8.489.200 


2.698.340 


11,187,540 


15.00 


1911 


194,639.00 


1909 


7,675.905 


2,450,021 


10,125,926 


16.00 


1910 


184,295.00 


1908 


7.312.165 


2,680,490 


9,992,655 


16.00 


1909 


191,295.00 


1907 


7,099,090 


2.317.468 


9,317,468 


14.50 


1908 


176.420.00 


1906 


6.303,625 


2,093,820 


8.397,445 


14.50 


1907 


167,320.00 


1905 


6.030.185 


2,117,442 


8,147,627 


14.50 


1906 


151,320.00 


loot 


5,489.121 


2,206,172 


7.695,293 


12.90 


1905 


110,0*40.00 


1903 


5,135.124 


1,286,981 


6,422,105 


11.50 


1904 


114.770.00 


1902 


4.762,665 


1,744,874 


6,507,539 


12.00 


1903 


75,270.00 


1901 


4.668,985 


1,598,745 


6.267.730 


12.00 


1902 


70,600.00 


1900 


4.446.900 


1,138,275 


5,585,175 


11.00 


1 1901 


68,100.00 


1899 


4,200.175 


1,199,045 


5,399,220 


11.50 


1900 


64,300.00 


1898 


4.135.582 


1,318.591 


5,454.173 


14.00 


1899 


59,000.00 


1897 


3.997.975 


1,304.163 


5.302,138 


12.00 


1898 


71,000.00 


1896 


3.896.059 


1.245.245 


5.141,304 


12.00 


1897 


78,250.00 


1895 


3,756.900 


1.444,947 


5,201,847 


12.00 


1896 


84,500.00 


1894 


3.619.525 


1.529,675 


5.149,200 


11.00 


1895 


66,333.30 


1893 


3.439.975 


1.649,953 


5.989.928 


11.00 


1894 


71,166.66 


1892 


3.271.279 


1,504,170 


4.775,449 


10.00 


1893 


37,499.90 


1891 


3.122.350 


1.771.373 


4,893,723 


1 10.00 


1892 


42,333.36 


1890 


3.001.550 


1,857.777 


4,859.327 


1 10.00 


1891 


48,666.66 


1889 


2..585.431 


1,453,301 


4.038.732 


1 8.40 


1890 


52,500.00 


1888 


2.465.256 


1,501,530 


3.966,792 


1 8.50 


1889 


56.000.00 


1887 


2,417.556 


1,288.498 


3,706,054 


1 8.00 


1888 


57,500.00 



166 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 

Treasurer's Report 



[Dec. 31 



James W. Libby, Treasurer, 

In account with th'e town of Swampscott for the year ended 
December 31, 1929. 

Balance on hand January 1, 1929 $116,450.55 

RECEIPTS 

Tax Collector 689,527.47 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 110,929.29 

Temporary Loan Notes, Issued in 
Anticipation of Revenue 

Notes discounted at 5.24% $100,000.00 

Notes discounted at 5.47% 100,000.00 

Notes discounted at 3.70% ^ 100,000.00 



Bonds and Notes, Issued and Sold 

School Loan, 1929 4^% $109,000.00 

Sewer Loan, 1929 W2% 94,200.00 

Street Loan, 1929 4^% 27,000.00 

Stable and Vault Loan, 1929 4>^% 23,500.00 

Premium at 102.15 plus $2.00 5,456.55 



Cemetery Lots Fund 

Income $2,494.31 
Principal 1,005.69 



300,000.00 



259,156.55 



3,500.00 



Municipal Insurance Fund 

Income $2,133.45 
Principal 1,019.70 

- 3,153.15 

Ellen R. Whittle Library Fund 

Income 101.25 
Joanna Morse Library Fund 

Income 263.03 
Mary L. Thomson Library Fund 

Income 50.63 
Phillips Medal Fund 

Income 40.99 
County of Essex 

Dox Tax Refund S11 .Zl 

Interest on Treasurer's deposits 3,381.74 
Miscellaneous 2,540.65 



Total Receipts $1,489,672.67 

Less: 

Treasury Warrants, honored and paid, numbered 

from 1 to 4958 inclusive 1,283,210.01 



Balance on hand, on deposit in banks December 31, 1929 $206,462.66 



1929] 



REPORT OF TREASURER 



167 



Bonds and Notes Payable 

Issued inside Debt Limit 
School Loans 

Machon School Building Loan, 1920 $66,000.00 

Schoolhouse Loan, 1911 8,000.00 

Palmer School Loan, 1922 12,000.00 

Schoolhouse Loan, 1925 67,000.00 

High School Addition, 1915 12,000.00 

Hadley School Land Loan, 1913 2,000.00 

School Loan, 1929 109,000.00 



Total Schoolhouse debt outstanding $276,000.00 
Sewer Loans 

Sewer Loan, 1917 $6,000.00 

Sewer Loan, 1926 14,000.00 

Sewer Loan, 1926 1,000.00 

Sewer Loan, 1928 24,000.00 

Sewer Loan, 1929 94,200.00 



Total Sewer Loans outstanding issued 

inside debt limit 139,200.00 

Street Loans 

Humphrey Street Loan, 1914 $12,500.00 

Essex Street Concrete Pavement Loan, 1925 11,000.00 

Street Loan, 1925 3,000.00 

Street Loan, 1926 6,000.00 

Street Loan, 1929 27,000.00 



Total Street Loans outstanding 59,500.00 

Miscellaneous Loans 

Public Park and Town Hall Loan, 1913 $2,000.00 

Essex Street Park Loan, 1912 2,400.00 

Stable and Vault Loan, 1929 23,500.00 



Total Miscellaneous Loans outstanding 27,900.00 

Total Loans outstanding, issued inside debt limit $502,600.00 

Issued outside Debt Limit 

Essex County Tuberculosis Hospital Loan, 1925 $47,000.00 

Water Loans 

Fifth Issue, 1909 $30,000.00 

Fourteenth Issue, 1917 2,500.00 

Seventeenth Issue, 1920 ■ 16.000.00 

Eighteenth Issue, 1922 8.000.00 

Nineteenth Issue, 1922 3.500.00 

Twentv-first Issue, 1923 9,000.00 

Twenty-second Issue, 1924 7,000.00 

Twentv-third Issue, 1927 3,000.00 



Total Water Loan Bonds and Notes 

issued and outstanding $79,000.00 

vSewer Loans 

Issued, 1902 $59,800.00 

Issued, 1912 3,750.00 

Issued, 1914 10.000.00 - 

Issued, 1915 5,000.00 

Issued, 1916 12,150.00 



168 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



Issued, 1917 $500.00 

Issued, 1920 4,000.00 

Issued, 1921 26,000.00 

Issued, 1922 11,500.00 

Issued, 1923 3,000.00 

Issued, 1924 12,000.00 

Total Sewer Loan Bonds and Notes, 
issued outside the debt limit, outstanding 



$147,700.00 



Liabilities 

General Debt Bonds and Notes Payable, 
Issued Inside Debt Limit 
Due in 1930 
Due in 1931 
Due in 1932 
Due in 1933 
Due in 1934 
Due in 1935 
Due in 1936 
Due in 1937 
Due in 1938 
Due in 1939 
Due in 1940 
Due in 1941 
Due in 1942 
Due in 1943 
Due in 1944 
Due in 1945 

Due in 1946 : 

Due in 1947 

Due in 1948 

Due in 1949 

Due in 1950 

Due in 1951 ^ 

Due in 1952 

Due in 1953 

Due in 1954 

Due in 1955 

Due in 1956 

Due in 1957 

Due in 1958 

Due in 1959 

Issued Outside Debt Limit 



Due in 
Due in 
Due in 
Due in 
Due in 
Due in 
Due in 
Due in 



1930 
1931 
1932 
1933 
1934 
1935 
1936 
1937 



Due in 1938 

Due in 1939 

Due in 1940 

Due in 1941 

Due in 1942 

Due in 1943 

Due in 1944 



$51,900.00 
47,200.00 
39,200.00 
37,200.00 
35,200.00 
26,700.00 
23,700.00 
23,700.00 
23,700.00 
22,700.00 
22,700.00 
16,700.00 
15,000.00 
15,000.00 
14,000.00 
14,000.00 
10,000.00 
10,000.00 
10,000.00 
10,000.00 
4,000.00 
4,000.00 
4,000.00 
4,000.00 
3,000.00 
3,000.00 
3,000.00 
3,000.00 
3,000.00 
3,000.00 



$4,000.00 
4,000.00 
3,000.00 
3,000.00 
3,000.00 
3,000.00 
3,000.00 
3,000.00 
3,000.00 
3,000.00 
3,000.00 
3,000.00 
3,000.00 
3,000.00 
3,000.00 



$502,600.00 



$47,000.00 



1929] 



REPORT OF TREASURER 



169 



Sewer Loans, Issued Outside Debt Limit 



Due in 


1 n7f\ 


rt»1 /I o CO OO 


Due in 


1 O"? 1 


1 A OOO OO 

14,UUU.UU 


Due in 


1 O '29 


1 1 Q CO OO 


Due in 




1 O O CO OO 


Due in 




1 O O CO OO 


Due in 


1 oic 


O "2 CO OO 


Due in 




O "2 CO OO 


Due in 




O "2 CO OO 


Due in 


1 n "J o 


n "3 C A AA 

9,350.00 


Due in 




O "2 CO OO 


Due in 


1 O/l A 


"7 "2 CO OO 


Due in 


1 O/l 1 


7 "2 CO OO 


Due in 


iy4^ 


A '2C0 OO 


Due in 




1 7 CO OO 


Due in 


1 O/l A 

ly44 


1 7 CO OO 


Due in 


1 O/l c 


1 coo OO 


Due in 




1 "^inn no 


Due in 


1947 


1,500.00 


Due in 


1948 


1,500.00 


Due in 


1949 


1,500.00 


Due in 


1950 


1,500.00 


Due in 


1951 


1,500.00 


Due in 


1952 


500.00 



$147,700.00 



Water Loans, Issued Outside Debt Limit 

Due in 1930 $8,000.00 

Due in 1931 8,000.00 

Due in 1932 8,000.00 

Due in 1933 8,000.00 

Due in 1934 8,000.00 

Due in 1935 7,500.00 

Due in 1936 7,000.00 

Due in 1937 5,500.00 

Due in 1938 5,500.00 

Due in 1939 4,500.00 

Due in 1940 ^ 1,500.00 

Due in 1941 1,500.00 

Due in 1942 1,500.00 

Due in 1943 1,500.00 

Due in 1944 1,500.00 

Due in 1945 1,500.00 

■ $79,000.00 

Temporary Loan Notes 

Issued in Anticipation of Revenue 

No. Date Payable at Rate When Payable Amount 

440 Dec. 6, 1929 1st Nat'l Bank, Boston 3.70% Nov. 12, 1930 $25,000.00 

441 Dec. 6, 1929 1st Nat'l Bank, Boston 3.70% Nov. 12, 1930 $25,000.00 

442 Dec. 6, 1929 1st Nat'l Bank, Boston 3.70% Nov. 12, 1930 $25,000.00 

443 Dec. 6, 1929 1st Nat'l Bank, Boston 3.70% Nov. 12, 1930 $25,000.00 



$100,000.00 



1929] 



REPORT OF TREASURER 



171 



Town Debt December 31, 1929 
General Debt Bonds and Notes 
Inside Debt Limit Issues $502,600.00 
Outside Debt Limit Issues 47,000.00 
Sewer Loan Bonds and Notes 147,700.00 
Water Loan Bonds and Notes 79,000.00 



Total Debt 

General Debt Statement Indicating 
as of December 31, 

\'aluation 1927, less abatements 
Valuation 1928. less abatements 
Valuation 1929, less abatements 

Gross three years' valuation 

Average valuation 



Three per cent, of average valuation 
Less: 

Bonds and Notes issued within the debt limit 



$776,300.00 



Borrowing Capacity 
1929 

*$22.878,428.00 

* 22.746.142.00 

* 24,058,086.00 



Borrowing Capacity 



$69,682,656.00 
$23,227,552.00 

$696,826.56 
502.600.00 

$194,226.56 



*Figures furnished by the Board of Assessors. 



Respectfullv submitted, 

JAMES W. LIBBY, 

Town Treasurer. 



172 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



Trust Funds 



Joanna Morse Library Fund 

Balance, January 1, 1929 
Principal $5,196.00 
Income accrued, 1929 263.03 



$5,459.03 

Less withdrawals 263.03 



Incmne accrued $2,133.45 
Dividends, 1929 226.71 



Balance, December 31, 1929 $5,196.00 



Ellen R. Whittle Library Fund 

Principal, January 1, 1929 $2,000.00 
Income accrued, 1929 ' 101.25 



$2,101.25 

Less withdrawals 101.25 



Balance, December 31, 1929 ' $2,000.00 



Mary L. Thomson Library Fund 

Balance, January 1, 1929 

Principal $1,000.00 
Income accrued, 1929 50.63 



$1,050.63 

Less withdrawals 50.63 



Balance, December 31, 1929 $1,000.00 



Fund for Perpetual Care of Cemetery Lots 

Balance, January 1, 1929 $16,393.27 
Deposits 4,184.50 

$20,577.77 



Dividends, 1929 694.18 



$21,271.95 

Less withdrawals 3',500.00 



Balance, December 31, 1929 - $17,771.95 

Municipal Insurance Fund 

Balance, January 1, 1929 

Principal $3,902.00 



2.360.16 



$6,262.16 

Less withdrawals 3,153.15 



Balance, December 31, 1929 



$3,109.01 



1929] 



REPORT OF THE TRUST FUNDS 



173 



Phillips School Medal Fund 
Balance, January 1, 1929 

Principal $1,000.00 
Income accrued 1,291.37 



$2,291.37 

Dividends, 1929 115.99 



$2,407.36 

Less withdrawals for medals 40.99 



Balance, December 31, 1929 ^2,366.37 

High School Alumni Fund (see note) 

Balance, January 1, 1929 $3,839.11 
Dividends, 1929 181.20 



Total $4,020.31 
Less 

Withdrawal, payment made on account 
of Scholarship awarded by Executive 
Committee of High School Alumni 

Association 100.00 



Balance, December 31, 1928 $3,920.31 

NOTE. — This is not a town of Swampscott trust fund as defined by 
Chapter 282 of the General Acts of 1915, but is held by the Town 
Treasurer as Trustee for the Swampscott High School Alumni. It 
is included in this report in order that the members of the High School 
Alumni may be kept informed of its existence. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES W. LIBBY, 
Town Treasurer. 
Treasurer of Trust Funds and Custodian of 
all funds and securities, as provided for by 
Chapter 282 of the General Acts of 1915. 
Swampscott, December 31, 1929. 



174 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



Collector of Taxes 



Ralph D. Merritt, Collector of Taxes, in Account Current with the 



Town of Swampscott. 
1929 
Dr. 

State tax $28,305.00 

County tax 42,960.32 

State highway* 1,140.42 

Auditing municipal accounts " 824.33 

Snow removal 47.40 

Charles River Basin 2,518.48 

Metropolitan Park 14,009.09 

Metropolitan Planning Board 158.67 

Southern route 158.93 

Northern route 1,668.50 

Moth tax 2,562.25 

Sidewalk assessment 1,332.26 

Sewer assessment 1,005.88 

Town tax 446,827.49 

Overlay 4,000.00 

Poll tax 6,108.00 

Poll tax (supplementary) 46.00 

Special warrant (vessel) 70.67 
Interest on taxes at 6 per cent, from Oct. 15, 1929, to 

January 1, 1930 183.03 



$553,926.72 

Or. 

Cash paid on moth tax $2,239.25 

Cash paid on sidewalk assessment 974.87 

Cash paid on sewer assessment 573.62 

Cash paid on poll taxes 5,998.00 

Cash paid on taxes 458,293.70 

Cash paid on special warrant (vessel) 70.67 
Cash paid on interest on taxes from October 15, 1929, to 

January 1, 1930 183.03 

Abatement on poll taxes 72.00 

Abatement on taxes 1,363.18 

Abatement on moth taxes .50 

Uncollected moth tax 322.50 

Uncollected sidewalk assessment 357.39 

Uncollected sewer assessment 432.26 

Uncollected poll taxes 84.00 

Uncollected taxes 82,961.75 



$553,926.72 

Motor Vehicle Excise Tax, 1929 
Dr. 

Excise tax warrant No. 1 $29,047.74 

Excise tax warrant No. 2 9,642.82 

Excise tax warrant No. 3 6,229.39 

Excise tax warrant No. 4 1,596.72 

Excise tax warrant No. 5 2,597.80 

Excise tax warrant No. 6 1,089.96 

Interest on taxes from October 15, 1929, to January 1, 1930 45.93 



$50,250.36 



1929] 



REPORT OF COLLECTOR OF TAXES 



175 



Cr. 

Cash paid on excise taxes 
Abatement on excise taxes 

Interest paid on taxes from October 15, 1929, to 

January 1, 1930 
Uncollected excise taxes 



Water rates 



Cash paid 
Uncollected 



Water 1927 
Dr. 



Cr. 



$16.07 
1.43 



$42,963.93 
4,032.27 

45.93 
3,208.23 

$50,250.36 



$17.50 



Water rates 



Cash paid 

Abatements 

Uncollected 



Water 1928 
Dr. 



Cr. 



$9,775.77 
50.83 
199.18 



$10,025.78 



Water rates 



Cash paid 

Abatements 

Uncollected 



Water 1929 
Dr. 



Cr. 



$58,519.08 
121.00 
12,803.71 



$71,443.79 



Water service 
Cash paid 

Water service 



Cash paid 
Uncollected 



Water Service 1927 
Dr. 



Cr. 



Water Service 1928 
Dr. 



Cr. 



$58.40 



$1,062.78 
142.48 



$58.40 



$1,205.26 



Water Service 1929 
Dr. 

Water service $6,540.13 

Cr. 

Cash paid $5,318.67 

Abatements 91.43 

Uncollected 1.130.03 



176 TOWN DOCUMENTS [Dec. 31 



Miscellaneous, Rents 1927 
Dr. 

Miscellaneous, rents $115.52 



Cr. 

Cash paid $25.67 
Uncollected • 89.85 



Miscellaneous, Rents 1928 
Dr. 

Miscellaneous, rents $139.35 



Cr. 

Cash paid $105.42 
Uncollected 33.93 



Miscellaneous, Rents 1929 
Dr. 

Miscellaneous, rents $910.33 



Cr. 

Cash paid $704.02 
Uncollected 206.31 



Respectfully submitted, 

RALPH D. MERRITT, 

Tax Collector. 



1929] 



ACCOUNTANT'S REPORT 

Accounting Department 



177 



THE TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

To the Board of Selectmen: 

In accordance with the provisions of Chapter 41 of the General 
Laws, I herewith submit the following report of the Accounting De- 
partment for the year ending December 31, 1929. 



Taxes : 
Poll, 1927 
Personal, 1927 
Real Estate, 1927 

Poll, 1928 
Personal, 1928 
Real Estate, 1928 

Poll, 1929 
Personal, 1929 
Real Estate, 1929 

Tax Titles 

Income Tax, 1928 
Income Tax, 1929 
Corp. Tax Business, 1928 
Corp. Tax Business, 1929 
Corp. Tax P. S., 1925 
Corp. Tax P. S., 1928 
Corp. Tax P. S., 1929 
National Bank Tax 
National Bank Tax, 1926 
National Bank Tax, 1928 
National Bank Tax, 1929 
Trust Co. Tax, 1927 
Trust Co. Tax, 1926 
Trust Co. Tax, 1928 
Trust Co. Tax, 1929 
Street Railway Tax, 1928 
Street Railway Tax, 1929 

Licenses and Permits: 
Taxi 
Junk 
Peddlers 
Pool 

Bowling Alley 
Express 

Used Car Dealers 

Elevator 

Innholders 



Treasurer's Receipts 

$8.00 
167.31 
974.88 



20.00 
1,473.80 
76,935.26 

6,000.00 
23,632.89 
434,590.14 



4,597.19 
84,372.00 
951.29 
6,597.00 
10.45 
318.41 
4,923.54 
.19 
6.86 
2.65 
2,634.16 
50.25 
22.82 
11.72 
2,631.87 
.47 
656.18 



10.00 
225.00 
99.00 
6.00 
4.00 
16.00 
35.00 
16.00 
40.00 



$1,150.19 



78.429.06 



464,223.03 
1.621.65 



$545,423.93 



107.787.05 107,787.05 



Amount carried forward 



$653,210.98 



178 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



Amount brought forward 
Common Victualers 
Milk 
Alcohol 
Non-alcohol 
Oleo 

Soap Grease 

Ice Cream 

Hairdresser 

Cesspool 

Transportation 

Auctioneer 

Manicure 

Intelligence Office 

Fines and Forfeits: 

Court fines 
Grants and Gifts: 

Dog Taxes from County 
Excise Tax 
Tax on vessels 
Special Assessments: 

Moth, 1927 

Moth, 1928 

Mofh, 1929 

Sewers, 1928 
Sewers, 1929 
Unapportioned Sewers 

Sidewalks, 1928 
Sidewalks, 1929 
Unapportioned Sidewalks 



General Government: 
Selectmen 

Gasoline hearings 

Zoning hearings 

Sale of maps 
Collector of Taxes 
Town Hall 

Board of Appeals, hearings 



$36.00 
37.50 
20.00 
10.00 
3.50 
2.00 
5.00 
5.00 
2.00 
4.00 
6.00 
2.00 
2.00 



318.54 

577.37 

42,918.00 
70.67 

1.00 
290.75 
2,239.25 

235.46 
573.62 
10,807.32 

619.70 
1,020.85 
383.70 



125.00 
30.00 
8.00 
120.00 
132.00 
70.00 



Protection of Persons and Property: 

Police 1.65 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 73.87 

Tree Warden 6.50 

Building permits 341.00 



Health: 

Division of Sanatoria 
Board and Treatment 
Sale of Ribbons 

Highway: 
Removing Snow, State Road 
Use of Roller 



1,166.42 

89.70 
40.00 



[Dec. 31 
$653,210.98 



$586.00 586.00 

318.54 318.54 

577.37 577.37 

42,918.00 42,918.00 

70.67 70.67 



2,531.00 
11,616.40 
2,024.25 



16,171.65 



232.00 
400.00 



485.00 



423.02 



1,256.52 



632.00 



Amount carried forward 



$713,853.21 



1929] 



ACCOUNTANT'S REPORT 



179 



Amount brought forward 



$713,853.21 



Charities : 
Relief given from cities and 
towns 
From State 

Mothers' Aid from State 
Burial of Paupers 
Sale of Safe 

Soldiers' Benefits: 
State Aid 
Military Aid 
Soldiers' Burials 

Schools: 
Tuition State Wards 
Other Tuition 
Sale of Supplies 
Vocational Education 
All other 

Library : 

Fines 

Park: 

Fish House Receipts 

Cemetery: 
Sale of lots 
Perpetual Care 

Care of lots not under perpetual 



Water: 

Rates, 1927 
Rates, 1928 
Rates, 1929 

Services 
Rent 
Interest 
Miscellaneous 

Interest: 

On Deposits 

On Taxes 

On Tax Titles 

On Sidewalks Assessments 

On Sewer Assessments 

On Excise Taxes 

Premiums on Bonds 

Municipal Indebtedness: 
Loans in Anticipation of 

Revenue 
Public Improvement Bonds 



Amount carried forward 



$544.67 
809.35 
126.67 
121.96 
10.00 



432.00 
160.00 
51.00 



83.13 
336.25 

62.72 
191.71 

39.55 



386.91 
388.30 



3,591.00 

593.50 

62.00 



16.07 
9,775.77 
58,519.08 



3,381.74 

2,665.85 
83.23 
2.76 
2.74 
45.93 
5,456.55 



300,000.00 
253,700.00 



$1,612.65 



643.00 



713.36 
386.91 
388.30 



$6,540.76 



4,246.50 4,246.50 



68,310.92 
6,439.85 
480.00 
325.11 
30.00 



75,585.88 



11,638.80 11,638.80 



553,700.00 553,700.00 



$1,365,565.15 



180 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



Amount brought forward $1,365,565.15 

Trust Funds: 

Joanna Morse Library Fund, 

Income $263.03 
Ellen R. Whittle Library Fund, 

Income 101.25 
Mary L. Thomson Library 

Fund, Income 50.63 

Phillips Medal Fund, Income 40.99 
Municipal Insurance Fund, 

Income 2,133.45 

Municipal Insurance Fund 1,019.70 

Cemetery Lots Fund, Income 2,494.31 

Cemetery Lots Fund 1,005.69 



Refunds: 

Unclaimed Checks 1,641.55 

Insurance Refunds 295.22 

Insurance Loss 256.16 

Overpayments, Checks returned 642.94 

Refunds of Payments 208.45 



$7,109.05 $7,109.05 



3,044.32 3,044.32 



$1,375,718.52 

Balance January 1, 1929 116,450.55 
Total Receipts $1,492,169.07 



TRANSFERS 

From Excess and Deficiency: 

To Police Motorcycles $530.00 

To Police Side Cars 230.00 

To New F. A. Box, Stanley School 250.00 

To Hydrant Rental 1,000.00 

To New Hose 500.00 

To Essex Street Bridge 600.00 

To Danvers Street Bridge 800.00 

To Tercentenary 200.00 

To Puritan Park Streets 1,500.00 

To Crescent Street 250.00 

To Catch Basin, Puritan Road 700.00 

To Catch Basin, Cherry Street 650.00 

To Manhole, Palmer's Pond 200.00 

To Drain, Aspen Road 2,500.00 

To Lewis Road 475.00 

To Nason Road 1,300.00 

To Cedar Road 475.00 

To Francis Road 600.00 

To F. A. Box, Lewis Road 200.00 

To F. A. Box, Harrison Avenue 200.00 

To McDermott Bill 163.97 

To County Deficit 4,665.53 

To Awards and Executions 1,083.20 

To Humphrey Street 5,000.00 

To Bay View Drive 3,500.00 

To Care of Prisoners 100.00 

To Fourth of July 1,000.00 

To Drain, Humphrey Street 240.00 



1929] 



ACCOUNTANT'S REPORT 



181 



I 



To Eastern Intercepting Sewer $3,240.00 

To Phillips Avenue Sewer 300.00 

To Bradlee Avenue Sewer 720.00 
To Humphrey Street and Ocean Avenue 

Sewer 78.00 

To Bristol Avenue Sewer 258.00 
To Sargent Road and Prospect Avenue 

Sewer 270.00 

To Barnstable Street Sewer 114.00 

To King's Brook Culvert 780.00 

To Monument Avenue and Walker Road 3,000.00 

To Franklin Avenue 3,000.00 

From Reserve Fund: 

To Police 900.00 

To Emergency Water 1,500.00 

To Franklin Avenue 893.48 

To School Repairs 624.40 

To Fire Department Pump Repairs 534.50 

To Forest Warden 82.95 

To Forest Warden 45.00 

To Public Welfare 240.81 

To Police 94.46 

To Soldiers' Relief 84.40 

From Premium on Notes and Bonds: 

To General Debt Maturing 5,456.55 
From Municipal Insurance Fund Income: 

To Insurance 2,133.45 
From Municipal Insurance Fund: 

To Insurance 1,019.70 
From Cemetery Lots Fund Income: 

To Cemetery Improvements 1,994.31 

To Cemetery Truck 500.00 
From Cemetery Lots Fund: 

To Cemetery Improvements 1,005.69 
From Redington Street School: 

To High School Committee 801.90 
From Franklin Avenue Sewer: 

To Emergency Sewer 3,851.36 
From Fuller Avenue Sewer: 

To Emergency Sewer 605.97 
From Eastern Intercepting Sewer: 

To Emergency Sewer 9.06 



$40,672.70 



5,000.00 



17,377.99 
$63,050.69 



EXPENDITURES 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 
Legislative 

Moderator, salary $100.00 

Finance Committee 

Clerical Services 111.34 
Reports 161.00 
All other 6.65 



$100.00 



278.99 



Amount carried forward 



$378.99 



182 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



Amount brought forward 

Special Town Meetings 
Warrants 



$24.75 



Salaries and Wages 
Selectmen 
Secretary- 
Assistant 



Selectmen's Department 

1,500.00 
300.00 
945.00 



Other Expenses 

Stationery and Postage 
Printing and Advertising 
Carfares, Teams, etc. 
Furniture and Fixtures 
Flowers 

Flowers for Honor Roll 

Books 

Repairs 

Addressing Machine 
All other 



123.16 
252.71 
41.20 
180.96 
70.00 
20.00 
33.50 
106.20 
171.84 
30.43 



$378.99 
24.75 



$403.74 



2,745.00 



1,030.00 



3,775.00 



Salaries and Wages 
Accountant 
Clerks 



Accounting Department 

2,000.00 
347.00 



Other Expenses 

Stationery and Postage 
Printing and Advertising 
Telephone 
All other 



92.14 
39.25 
35.80 
29.60 



2,347.00 



196.79 



2,543.79 



Salaries and 
Treasurer 
Assistant 
All other 



Wages 



Treasury Department 

1,200.00 
300.00 
15.00 



Other Expenses 

Stationery and Postage 

Printing and Advertising 

Carfares, Teams, etc. 

Telephone 

Bond 

Insurance 

Furniture and Fixtures 

Painting 

All other 



158.77 
16.12 
10.80 
10.58 

230.00 
94.50 

102.23 

115.00 
28.75 



1,515.00 



2,281.75 



Amount carried forward 



$9,004.2& 



1929] 



ACCOUNTANT'S REPORT 



183 



Amount brought forward $9,004.28 
Collector of Taxes Department 

Salaries and Wages 
Collector $1,500.00 
Assistant 115.00 



Other Expenses 

Stationery and Postage 349.08 

Printing and Advertising 441.50 

Tax Titles 238.08 

Bond 480.00 

Insurance 94.50 

Painting 87.00 

Furniture and Fixtures 172.25 

All other 8.90 



$1,615.00 



Assessors* Department 

Salaries and Wages 

Assessors 1,900.00 

Assistant 200.00 

Clerk 936.00 



Other Expenses 

Stationery and Postage 182.52 

Printing and Advertising 478.72 

Carfare, Teams, etc. 75.36 

Telephone 27.54 

Furniture and Fixtures 199.30 

Deed Abstracts 103.37 

All other 56.00 



Town Clerk's Department 

Salaries and Wages 
Town Clerk 200.00 
Assistant 88.00 
Elections 100.00 
Canvassing Births 25.00 



Other Expenses 

Stationery and Postage 69.53 

Printing and Advertising 162.10 

Oaths, Justice of the Peace 42.50 

Dog Tags 20.40 

Bond 5.00 

All other 2.17 



Law Department 

Salaries and Wages 
Town Counsel 1,100.00 
Special Attorneys 15.00 
Stenographer 150.00 
Expert Witnesses 75.00 



1,871.31 

3,486.31 



3,036.00 



1,122.81 

4,158.81 



413.00 



301.70 

714.70 



1,340.00 



Amount carried forward $17,364.10 



184 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



Amount brought forward 

Other Expenses 

Pictures $72.00 

Auto Hire 20.00 

Recording Fees 14.04 

Service of Processes 39.75 

Printing 165.00 



$310.79 



Election and Registration Department 

Salaries and Wages 

Registrars 425.00 
Election Officers 800.00 
Janitors' Overtime 25.50 
All other 26.25 



Other Expenses 

Stationery and» Postage 10.45 

Printing and Advertising 464.30 

Carfares, Teams, etc. 221.00 

Rent of Polling Places 160.00 

Moving School Desks 23.00 



1.276.75 



878.75 



Certification of Notes and Bonds 

Certifying 839.00 
Advertising 32.00 



Engineering Department 

Salaries and Wages 

Engineer 2,860.00 
Assistants 3,220.83 



Other Expenses 

Stationery and Postage 23.86 

Supplies 136.49 

Blue Prints 12.12 

Auto Expense 272.04 

Expenses 42.50 

Furniture and Fixtures 21,50 

All other 8.00 



871.00 



6.080.83 



516.51 



Town Hall Department 

Salaries and Wages 

Janitor 1,820.00 
Assistant 30.00 



Other Expenses 

Fuel 574.20 

Light 347.70 

Janitor's Supplies 189.97 

Repairs 271.53 

Water 18.35 

Telephone 521.05 

Furniture and Fixtures 225.25 

All other 1.75 



1,850.00 



2,149.80 



$17,364.10 
$1,650.79 

2,155.50 
871.00 

6,597.34 
3,999.80 



Amount carried forward 



$32,638.53 



1929] 



ACCOUNTANT'S REPORT 



185 



Amount brought forward $32,638.53 

Town Hall Repairs 

General $1,498.15 $1,498.15 

Board of Appeals 

Clerical Services $150.00 
Advertising 24.15 
Books 50.75 
Stationery and Postage 24.75 

249.65 249.65 



Summary of General Government 





Appropriation 


Expenditures 


Balance 


Legislative 


$550.00 


$403.74 


$146.26 


Selectmen . . 


3,775.00 


3,775.00 




Accounting .. ... .. 


2,545.00 


2,543.79 


1.21 


Treasury .. . — . .. 


2,303.00 


2,281.75 


21.25 


Cert, of Notes and Bonds .. 


1,000.00 


871.00 


129.00 


Collector of Taxes.. 


3,489.50 


3,486.31 


3.19 


Assessors . - 


4,200.00 


4,158.81 


41.19 


Town Clerk 


716.00 


714.70 


1.30 


Law .-. , - - 


2,000.00 


1,650.79 


349.21 


Election and Registration 


3,000.00 


2,155.50 


844.50 


Engineering . ... ... 


6,600.00 


6,597.34 


2.66 


Town Hall .. 


4,000.00 


3,999.80 


.20 


Town Hall Repairs .. - 


1,500.00 


1,498.15 


1.85 


Board of Appeals 


250.00 


249.65 


.35 


Total 


$35,928.50 


$34,386.33 


$1,542.17 



PROTECTION OF LIFE AND PROPERTY 
Police Department 

Salaries and Wages 

Chief $2,600.00 
Captains 4,400.00 
Patrolmen 21,875.06 
Special Police 1,441.49 
Clerk 936.00 

$31,252.55 



Autos and Care of Same 

Gasoline and Oil 696.36 

Tires and Tubes 142.13 

Repairs and Supplies 738.57 



Equipment and Repairs 

Equipment for Men 351.43 
Department Equipment 326.26 



Fuel and Light 

Fuel 285.50 
Light 116.59 



Maintenance of Buildings and Grounds 

Repairs 76.07 

Janitor's Supplies 299.76 

All other 120.07 



1,577.06 



677.69 



402.09 



495.90 



Amount carried forward 



$34,386.33 



186 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



Amount brought forward 

Other Expenses 

Printing, Stationery and Postage $270.20 

Telephone 1,075.46 

Medical Services 39.89 

Beacons 40.00 

Paint 195.83 

Furniture and Fixtures 113.88 

Photos 12.25 

Expenses at Police School 32.00 

Signs 77.18 

Insurance 48.00 

Water 15.86 

Express 14.59 

Newspapers 12.70 

All other 15.75 



$34,386.33 



$1,963.59 



36,368.88 



Police Specials 



Motorcycle 
Side Cars 



530.00 
230.00 



530.00 
230.00 



Salaries and Wages 
Engineers 
Chief 

Deputy Chief 

Captains 

Privates 

Other Employees 

Equipment 
Apparatus 

Equipment for Men 

Maintenance and Repairs 
Repairs 

Gasoline and Oil 
Alarm Boxes, etc. 
All other 

Fuel and Light 
Fuel 
Light 



Fire Department 

250.00 
2,600.00 
2,160.00 
6,300.00 
22,000.00 
2.328.17 



250.30 
129.75 



852.12 
299.05 
370.71 
98.16 



541.33 
358.02 



Maintenance of Buildings and Grounds 

Repairs 379.31 

Furniture and Furnishings 107.46 

Laundry Work 84.12 

Water 81.88 

All other 326.36 



Other Expenses 
Stationery, Printing and Postage 
Telephone 

Medical Services and Supplies 
All other 



46.21 
202.24 
14.40 
24.60 



35,638.17 



380.05 



1,620.04 



899.35 



979.13 



287.45 



39,804.19 



Amount carried forward 



$111,319.40 



1929] 



ACCOUNTANT'S REPORT 



187 



Amount brought forward $111,319.40 

Fire Department Specials 

Hydrant Rental $1,000.00 1,000.00 

New Hose 489.02 489.02 

Fire Alarm Box, Harrison Avenue 200.00 200.00 

Fire Alarm Box, Lewis Road 194.53 194.53 

Fire Alarm Box, Stanley School 247.05 247.05 

Pump Repairs 534.50 534.50 
Fire Alarm Extension 

Contract $4,720.94 

Advertising 8.40 

Labor 52.50 



4,781.84 4,781.84 



Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Salaries and Wages 

Sealer 400.00 400.00 

Other Expenses 

Stationery and Postage 21.16 

Printing and Advertising 4.90 

Teaming 126.99 

Paint and Brushes 1.95 



Inspector of Buildings 

Salaries and Wages 

Inspector 1,000.00 
Assistant Inspector 9.00 



Other Expenses 
Special Counsel 200.00 
Stationery 31.65 



Moth Department 

1,160.0 

Labor 2,517.50 



Salaries and Wages 

Superintendent 1,160.00 



Other Expenses 

Stationery, Printing and Postage 5.22 

Telephone 27.69 

Insecticides 329.53 

Hardware and Tools 162.24 

Carfare, Teams, etc. 272.00 

Gasoline and Oil 119.24 

All other 79.10 



Tree Warden Department 

Salaries and Wages 
Superintendent 920.00 
Labor 1.895.00 



155.00 

555.00 



1,009.00 



231.65 

1,240.65 



3,677.50 



995.02 

4,672.52 



2,815.00 



Amount carried forward ' $125,234.51 



188 TOWN DOCUMENTS [Dec. 31 



Amount brought forward $125,234.51 
Other Expenses 

Hardware and Tools $135.25 

Carfare, Teams, etc. 507.44 

Gasoline and Oil 76.31 

All other 6.00 



$725.00 



Forest Warden Department 

Labor 306.25 
Fire Gun 17.20 
Brooms 4.50 



3,540.00 



327.95 327.95 



Forest Warden Special 
Labor 500.00 500.00 

Subordinate Officials 

Dog Officer 300.00 
Constable 100.00 
Inspector of Animals 200.00 

- 600.00 600.00 



Summary of Protection of Persons and Property 

Appropriation Transfer to Expend. Balance 

Police $35,374.42 $994.46 $36,368.88 

Fire 39,840.00 39,804.19 $35.81 

Sealer of Weights and Measures- 555.00 555.00 

Inspector of Buildings 1,250.00 1,240.65 9.35 

Moth 4,673.00 4,672.52 .48 

Tree Warden 3,540.00 3,540.00 

Forest Warden 200.00 127.95 327.95 

Forest Warden Special 500.00 500.00 

Police Specials 

Motorcycles , 530.00 530.00 



Side Cars 230.00 230.00 

Fire Specials 

Stanley School F. A. Box 250.00 247.05 2.95 

Hydrant Rental 1,000.00 1,000.00 

New Hose 500.00 489.02 10.98 

Fire Alarm Box, Lewis Road 200.00 194.53 5.47 

Fire Alarm Box, Harrison Ave. 200.00 200.00 

Pump Repairs 534.50 534.50 

Fire Alarm Extension 5,000.00 4,781.84 218.16 

Subordinate Officials 630.00 600.00 30.00 



Total $94,472.42 $1,656.91 $95,816.13 $313.20 

HEALTH AND SANITATION 
Health Department 

Salaries and Wages 

Board of Health $500.00 
Agent and Clerk 2,778.00 
Stationery and Postage 126.53 
Printing and Advertising 211.50 
All other 169.90 

$3,785.93 



Amount carried forward 



$130,202.46 



1929] 



ACCOUNTANT'S REPORT 



189 



Amount brought forward 
Quarantine and Contagious Diseases 



Medical Attendance $39.00 

Drugs and Medicines 10.00 

Hospitals 148.00 

Culture Examinations 141.00 

All other 15.20 



Tuberculosis 

Board and Treatment 2,587.00 

Vital Statistics 

Births 531.50 

Deaths 24.75 



Other Expenses 

Plumbing Inspector 1,020.00 

Milk Inspection 326.68 

Slaughtering Inspector 100.00 

Ice Cream Inspection 8.00 



Cleaning Beaches 

Labor 664.34 

Disposing of Ofifal 418.56 

Burying Cats and Dogs 34.00 



Health Nurse 

Salary 1,300.00 
Use of Automobile 50.00 



Sewer Department 

Administration 

Commissioners 350.00 
Superintendent 1,820.00 
Stationery, Printing and Postage 12.00 
Clerical Services 260.00 



General 

Labor 35.00 

Tools and Equipment 32.40 

All other 40.47 



Connections 

Labor 59.16 

Pipe and Fittings 29.10 

Contractors 150.10 



Extensions 

Contractors 94.13 

Pipe and Fittings 42.75 

Castings 37.71 



$130,202.46 

$353.20 
2,587.00 

556.25 
1,454.68 

8,737.06 

1,116.90 

1,116.90 



1,350.00 1,350.00 



2,442.00 



107.87 



238.36 



174.59 



Amount carried forward 



$141,406.42 



190 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



Amount brought forward $141,406.42 
Pumping Station 

Engineers $3,640.00 

Supplies 161.62 

Light and Power 1,373.10 

Telephone 62.39 

Repairs 308.00 

Water 84.30 

Fuel 157.74 



$5,787.15 



Flushing Sewers 250.00 250.00 

8,999.97 



Particular Sewers 

Contractors 729.70 
Medical Services 2.00 



Refuse and Garbage 

Refuse Contract 7,890.00 
Garbage Contract 4,975.00 



Health Dumps 

Labor 1,629.16 
Teaming 2.50 
Tools 4.44 
Signs 3.90 
Building Fence 60.00 



Dental Clinic 

Dentist 1,000.00 

Supplies 116.28 

Coats and Towels 26.48 

Printing and Stationery 52.69 

Express .77 



Brooks 

Contractor 480.87 

Labor 17.50 

Materials ^ 1.63 



Drain, Humphrey Street 

Contractor 8.62 

Castings 64.38 

Curbing 152.00 

Advertising 8.40 

Stencils 5.00 

Blue Prints 1.60 



731.70 731.70 



12,865.00 12,865.00 



1,700.00 ^ 1,700.00 



1,196.22 1,196.22 



500.00 500.00 



240.00 240.00 



Eastern Intercepting Sewer 

Contractor 1,997.08 
Castings 491.56 
Inspection 472.50 
Advertising 24.15 



Amount carried forward . $167,639.31 



1929] 



ACCOUNTANT'S REPORT 



191 



Amount brought forward 
Pipe 

Crushed Stone 
Blue Prints 
Stencils 



Contractor 
Castings 
Inspection 
All other 



$231.70 
15.16 
6.60 
1.25 



Bradlee Avenue Sewer 
424.29 
143.56 
129.15 
23.00 



$167,639.31 



$3,240.00 3,240.00 



720.00 



720.00 



Contractor 
Castings 
Inspection 
Advertising 
All other 



Phillips Avenue Sewer 
88.14 
105.81 
87.50 
16.80 
1.75 



300.00 



300.00 



Humphrey Street and Ocean Avenue Sewer 

Contractor 20.46 
Castings 26.29 
Inspection 30.00 
Stencils 1.25 

78.00 



78.00 



Contractor 
Castings 
Inspection 
All other 



Contractor 
Castings 
Advertising 
Stencils 



Contractor 

Castings 

Inspection 

Advertising 

Stencils 



Contractor 

Castings 

Inspection 

Advertising 

Stencils 

Blue Prints 



Bristol Avenue Sewer 
155.27 
48.43 
47.54 
6.76 



258.00 



258.00 



Sargent Road and Prospect Avenue Sewer 
231.43 
26.29 
11.03 
1.25 



Barnstable 



Street Sewer 
24.07 
39.84 
43.33 
5.51 
1.25 



King's Brook Culvert 

556.03 
115.97 
80.00 
23.10 
2.50 
2.40 



270.00 



270.00 



114.00 



114.00 



780.00 



780.00 



Amount carried forward 



$173,399.31 



192 TOWN DOCUMENTS [Dec. 31 



Amount brought forward $173,399.31 

Walker Road Sewer Extension 

Contractor $826.31 

Castings - 37.03 

Advertising 18.90 

Gravel 35.20 

Water 17.95 

Stencils 1.25 

$936.64 936.64 

Summary of Health and Sanitation 

Appropriation Expenditures Balance 

Health $9,670.00 $8,737.06 $932.94 

Cleaning Beaches 1,256.00 1,116.90 139.10 

Health Nurse 1,350.00 1,350.00 

Sewer _ 9,000.00 8,999.97 .03 

Particular Sewers 1,000.00 731.70 268.30 

Refuse and Garbage 12,865.00 12,865.00 

Health Dumps 1,700.00 1,700.00 

Dental Clinic 1,200.00 1,196.22 3.78 

Brooks 500.00 500.00 

Drain, Humphrey Street 240.00 240.00 

Eastern Intercepting Sewer 3,240.00 3,240.00 

Bradlee Avenue Sewer 720.00 720.00 

Phillips Avenue Sewer 300.00 300.00 

Humphrey St. and Ocean Ave. Sewer— 78.00 78.00 

Bristol Avenue Sewer 258.00 258.00 

Sargent Road and Prospect Ave. Sewer 270.00 270.00 

Barnstable Street Sewer 114.00 114.00 

King's Brook Culvert 780.00 780.00 

Walker Road Sewer Extension 1,208.03 936.64 271.39 



Highway Department 

Labor 27,053.50 

Teams 6,322.50 

Stone and Gravel 2,176.01 

Equipment and Repairs 899.35 

Hay and Grain 2,370.96 

Medical Services 203.45 

Harness 196.30 

Blacksmith 476.64 

Veterinary 79.25 

Express 7.58 

Auto Repairs and Supplies 808.43 

Gasoline and Oil 530.82 

Light 64.06 

Fuel 279.39 

Telephone 16.99 

Kerosene Oil 74.25 



Total $45,749.03 $44,133.49 $1,615.54 

HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES 

Highway Administration 

Surveyor of Highways $2,600.00 
Clerk 200.00 
Telephone 72.56 



$2,872.56 2,872.56 



Amount carried forward 



$177,208.51 



1929] 



ACCOUNTANT'S REPORT 



193 



Amount brought forward 

Auto Insurance 

Boiler Insurance 

Fences 

Signs 

All other 



Labor 

Teams 

Outside Contractors 
Gasoline and Oil 
Snow Fences 
Plow 

Supplies and Repairs 



$307.70 
94.90 
55.54 
30.40 
18.50 



Snow and Ice 

3,850.00 
1,052.00 
531.00 
107.26 
210.00 
100.00 
68.75 



$177,208.51 



$42,066.52 42,066.52 



5,919.01 



5,919.01 



Arcs 

Incandescents 
Spot Light 
Traffic Signals 



Lighting Streets 

6,281.49 
15,181.78 
.75 
1,600.00 



Labor 
Materials 
Fencing 
Advertising 
Tar Concrete, New 
Tar Concrete, Skim Coating 



Sidewalks and Curbing 
852.50 



1,036.82 
124.21 
6.30 
819.20 
731.58 



23,064.02 23,064.02 



3,570.61 



3,570.61 



Labor 

Materials 

Castings 



Water 
Teams 
Water 

Other 
Labor 
Teams 
Materials 
Advertising 



Street Construction 
2,782.50 
105.26 
99.13 



Street Watering and Oiling 

280.00 

18.72 



495.00 
335.00 
2,624.75 
33.60 



Taric Cold Patch 
Tarvia K. P. 

B. B. Winter Cold Patch 
Special Heavy Tar 



Amount carried forward 



Seal Coating 

738.24 
2,428.50 
440.00 
336.85 



2,986.89 



298.72 



3,488.35 



2,986.89 



3,787.07 



3,943.59 3,943.59 



$262,546.22 



194 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



Amount brought forward 



$262,546.22 



Contractor 

Labor 

Teams 

Inspection 

Advertising 

Curbstone 



Tip Carts 



Advertising 
Stencils 



Labor 

Lumber 

Hardware 



Pointing 
Fence 



Continuous Sidewalks 
3.322.50 
245.00 
60.00 
25.00 
15.00 
1.183.39 



Repairs on Equipment 
550.00 

Humphrey Street Resurfacing 
14.70 
8.50 



Essex Street Bridge 
107.00 
479.51 
12.50 



Danvers Street Bridge 
33.16 
48.00 



Balance of Contract 



Foster Road 

100.00 



4,850.89 
550.00 

23.20 

599.01 

81.16 
100.00 



Kensington Lane and Northern Avenue 
Balance of Contract 150.00 150.00 



Serving notice 



Contractor 
Advertising 



Labor 
Teams 

Crushed Stone 



Contractor 



Whitman Road Taking 
8.95 

Whitman Road Construction 

965.89 
5.60 



Puritan Park Streets 
700.00 
300.00 
441.78 



Contractor 
Amount carried forward 



Crescent Street 

200.00 

Catch Basin, Puritan Road 
319.99 



8.95 
971.49 

1,441.78 
200.00 
319.99 



4,850.89 
550.00 

23.20 

599.01 

81.16 
100.00 
150.00 
8.95 

971.49 

1,441.78 

200.00 

319.99 
$271,842.69 



1929] 



ACCOUNTANT'S REPORT 



195 



Amount brought forward 



$271,842.69 



Labor 

Teams 

Pipe and Castings 



Labor 



Contractors 
Materials 



Contractor 
Advertising 



Catch Basin, Cherry Street 
432.00 
120.00 
41.20 



Lewis Road 

300.00 

Nason Road 

528.13 
146.43 



Cedar Road 

462.40 
12.60 



593.20 
300.00 

674.56 
475.00 



593.20 
300.00 

674.56 
475.00 



Contractor 
Materials 



Contractor 

Castings 

Inspection 

Engineering 

Curbstones 

Advertising 

All other 



Contractor 

Castings 

Inspection 

Curbstone 

Advertising 

All other 



Francis Road 

458.95 
114.65 



Franklin Avenue 

2,627.88 
47.62 
175.00 
62.50 
57.00 
16.80 
13.20 



573.60 



Monument Avenue 



and Walker Road 
2,613.59 
95.27 
128.34 
114.00 
33.60 
15.20 



Summary of Highway and Bridges 



Highway Administration 

Highway 

Snow and Ice 



Lighting Streets 

Sidewalks and Curbing 

Street Construction 

Street Water and Oiling. 
Seal Coating 



Continuous Sidewalks 

Repairs on Equipment 

Humphrey Street Resurfacing 



573.60 



3,000.00 3,000.00 



3,000.00 3,000.00 



Appropriation 


Expenditures 


Balance 


2,900.00 


2,872.56 


27.44 


42,800.00 


42,066.52 


733.48 


6,000.00 


5,919.01 


80.99 


23,729.00 


23,064.02 


664.98 


4,000.00 


3,570.61 


429.39 


3,000.00 


2,986.89 


13.11 


4,000.00 


3,787.07 


212.93 


4,000.00 


3,943.59 


56.41 


5,000.00 


4,850.89 


149.11 


600.00 


550.00 


50.00 


9,500.00 


23.20 


9,476.80 



Amount carried forward 



$280,459.05 



196 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



Amount brought forward $280,459.05 



Summary of Highway and Bridges (Continued) 

Appropriation Expenditures Balance 



Essex Street Bridge . 


$600.00 


$599.01 


$ .99 


Danvers Street Bridge. _ 


800.00 


81.16 


718.84 


Foster Road 


100.00 


^ 100.00 




Kensington Lane and Northern Avenue- 


238.60 


150.00 


88.60 


Whitman Road Taking— . .. 


300.00 


8.95 


291.05 


Whitman Road Construction 


2,300.00 


971.49 


1,328.51 


Puritan Park Streets 


1,500.00 


1,441.78 


58.22 


Crescent Street 


250.00 


200.00 


50.00 


Catch Basin, Puritan Road 


700.00 


319.99 


380.01 


Catch Basin, Cherry Street 


650.00 


593.20 


OO.oU 


Manhole, Palmer's Pond 


200.00- 




200.00 


Drain, Aspen Road 


2,500.00 




2,500.00 


Lewis Road 


475.00 


300.00 


175.00 


Nason Road 


1,300.00 


674.56 


625.44 


Cedar Road 


475.00 


475.00 




Francis Road - 


600.00 


573.60 


26.40 


Bay View Drive - - . - — 


3,500.00 




3,500.00 


Franklin Avenue 


3,000.00 


3,000.00 


Monument Avenue and Walker Road 


3,000.00 


3,000.00 




Total 


$128,017.60 


$106,123.10 


$21,894.50 



CHARITIES AND SOLDIERS' BENEFITS 



Public Welfare 

General Administration 

Salaries of Board $350.00 

Salary of Secretary 150.00 

Printing, Stationery and Postage 8.38 

Telephone 36.09 

Taxi Service 29.50 

All other 6.60 



Outside Relief by Town 

Groceries and Provisions 1,610.90 

Coal and Wood 340.93 

Board and Care 377.15 

Medicines and Medical Attendance 315.75 

State Institutions 712.00 

Cash Aid 3,180.00 

All other 40.17 



Relief by Other Cities and Towns 
Cities 
Towns 

Mothers' Aid by Town 
Other Expenses 
Rent 

Shoes and Shoe Repairs 
Funeral Expense 



1,239.86 
132.50 



244.00 

720.00 
112.70 
130.00 



$580.57 



6,576.90 



1,372.36 
244.00 



962.70 



9,736.53 



Amount carried forward 



$290,195.58 



1929] 



ACCOUNTANT'S REPORT 



197 



Amount brought forward 



$290,195.58 



Soldiers' Relief 

Administration $222.40 
Fuel _ 53.86 

Groceries and Provisions 323.16 
Rent 20.00 
Medicines and Medical Attendance 16.75 



Cash Aid 



State Aid 



Military Aid 



School 
Police 
Fire 

Highway 



5,220.00 



State Aid 

444.00 

Military Aid 

261.75 

Pensions 

925.04 
2,200.04 

300.00 
2,252.80 



$5,856.17 
444.00 
261.75 



5.856.17 



444.00 



261.75 



Burnett Fund 



Burnett Fund 



5,677.88 



1,144.00 



5,677.88 



1,144.00 



Summary of Charities and Soldiers' Benefits 

Approp. Transfer to Expend. Overdraft Balance 



Public Welfare 

Soldiers' Relief 

State Aid 

Military Aid 

Pensions 

Burnett Fund 



$9,500.00 
5,510.00 
500.00 
400.00 
5,677.88 
2,156.00 



$240.81 
84.40 



$9,736.53 
5,856.17 
444.00 
261.75 
5,677.88 
1,144.00 



261.77 



$4.28 

56.00 
138.25 

1,012.00 



Total 



$23,743.88 $325.21 $23,120.33 $261.77 $1,210.53 



SCHOOLS AND LIBRARIES 
Schools 

General 

Salary of Secretary of School 

Committee $50.00 

Salary of Superintendent 4,700.00 

Salary of Supt's. Clerk 1,359.98 

Truant Officer 150.00 

Printing, Stationery and Postage 95.42 

Telephone 505.10 

Traveling Expenses 508.33 

School Census 175.00 

All other ' 260.17 



Teachers' Salaries 
High 

Junior High 
Elementary 
Supervisory 
Substitutes 



33,835.00 
34,179.18 
45,158.00 
7,080.00 
578.00 



$7,804.00 



120,830.18 



Amount carried forward 



$303,579.38 



198 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



Amount brought forward 

Text Books and Supplies 

High Text and Reference Books $1,481.11 



$303,579.38 



High, all other 
Elementary Text and Reference 

Books 
Elementary, all other 
Junior High Text and Reference 

Books 
Junior High, all other 

Tuition 

Shoe School 
Continuation School 
Trade School 

Transportation 

Support of Truants 
Janitors' Services 
High 

Elementary 
Junior High 

Fuel and Light 
High 

Elementary 
Junior High 



1,604.51 

1,894.57 
1,936.88 

765.36 
1,087.84 



205.25 
Z7A.77 
26.18 

1,500.00 
39.71 

2,054.12 
3,758.40 
3,036.72 



1,301.60 

2,146.42 
3,527.66 



Maintenance of Buildings and Grounds 

High Repairs 422.31 

High Janitors' Supplies 11.05 

High, all other 134.11 

Elementary Repairs ^ 1,584.19 

Elementary Janitors' Supplies 650.39 

Elementary, all other 724.72 



Athletic Activities 

Furniture and Fixtures 
High 

Elementary 
Junior High 



Field Day 

Other Expenses 

Graduation Exercises 
Miscellaneous Printing 
Medical Services 
All other 



Domestic Science 
Manual Training 



724.27 

188.06 
1,074.06 
1,008.46 

114.01 

205.01 
380.20 
525.00 
12.00 

295.76 
1.257.54 



$8,770.27 



606.20 
1.500.00 
39.71 



8,849.24 



6,975.68 



3,526.77 
724.27 



2,270.58 
114.01 



1,132.21 
295.76 
1,257.54 



164,696.42 



Amount carried forward 



$468,275.80 



1929] 



ACCOUNTANT'S REPORT 



199 



Amount brought forward 



$468,275.80 



Library 

Salaries and Wages 

Librarian $1,700.00 

Assistants 1,589.10 

Janitors 1,218.00 

Books, Periodicals, etc. 

Books 1,220.73 

Periodicals 166.70 

Newspapers 22.27 

Binding Books 444.40 

Fuel and Light 

Fuel 322.65 

Light 287.04 

Buildings 

Repairs 137.18 

Furniture and Furnishings 32.99 

All other 150.36 

Other Expenses 

Stationery, Printing, Advertising 110.49 

Telephone 57.14 

Postage 12.00 

All other 28.95 



$4,507.10 



1,409.70 
444.40 



609.69 



320.53 



208.58 



Books 
Books 
Books 
Appraisers 



Architect 
Contractor 
Bond 
All other 



Engineer 

Contractor 

Advertising 



Shrubs 

Making Lawn 



Mary L. Thomson Library Fund Income 

11.69 11.69 

Ellen R. Whittle Library Fund Income 

101.25 101.25 

Joanna Morse Library Fund Income 

442.80 442.80 

Hastings Land Taking 

75.00 



75.00 



Stanley School 

3,608.64 
1,993.91 
375.00 
22.45 



6,000.00 



School Repairs 

100.00 
2,295.00 
29.40 



2,424.40 



Development of School Grounds 

409.10 
424.71 



7,500.00 
11.69 
101.25 
442.80 
75.00 



833.81 



6,000.00 



2,424.40 



833.81 



Amount carried forward 



$485,664.75 



200 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



Amount brought forward $485,664.75 

Traveling Expenses Outside State 

Expenses to Cleveland $116.00 $116.00 116.00 

Summary of Schools and Libraries 

' Approp. Transfer to Expend. Balance 

School $164,446.50 $256.16 $164,696.42 $6.24 

Library 7,500.00 7,500.00 

Mary L. Thomson Library Fund 

Income 48.78 50.63 11.69 87.72 

Joanna Morse Library Fund Income— 179.77 263.03 442.80 

Ellen R. Whittle Library Fund Income 101.25 101.25 

Hastings Land Taking 10,000.00 75.00 9,925.00 

Stanley School 6,000.00 6,000.00 

School Repairs 1,800.00 624.40 2,424.40 

Development of School Grounds- 1,000.00 833.81 166.19 

Traveling Expenses Outside State 116.00 116.00 

Total $191,091.05 $1,295.47 $182,201.37 $10,185.15 

RECREATION AND UNCLASSIFIED 
Parks 

Administration 

Salary of Secretary $100.00 
Telephone 27.69 



Stationery 3.10 



General Expenses 

Labor 890.00 

Equipment 355.70 

Use of Truck 453.00 

Tools 111.18 

All other 74.65 



$130.79 



1,884.53 



Blane}' Beach 

Superintendent 1,530.00 

Labor 70.00 

Supplies ~ 91.51 

Repairs 135.42 

Raft 84.75 

Water 51.53 



Jackson Park 

Labor 847.50 

Materials 19.65 

Water 5.50 



Abbott Park 

Labor 185.00 

Sign 2.50 

Water - 75.00 

Lowering Mast 15.00 



Phillips Park 

Labor 1,095.00 

Materials 979.95 

Water 11.00 

All other 3.06 



1,963.21 



872.65 



277.50 



2,089.01 



Amount carried forward $485,780.75 



1929] 



ACCOUNTANT'S REPORT 



201 



Amount brought forward $485,780.75 
Monument Lot 

Materials $13.08 

Lowering Mast 20.00 



Monument Avenue 

Labor 872.50 

Materials 14.90 

Water 18.73 

Shrubs, etc. 340.30 



$33.08 



1,246.43 



Printing Town Reports 

Advertising 11.55 
Editor 100.00 
Printing 1,001.05 
Distributing Reports 140.00 



Memorial Day 

Grand Army 300.00 
American Legion 125.00 
Veterans of Foreign Wars 75.00 



8,497.20 



Heat and Light, V. F. W. Hall 

Janitor 108.00 
Gas and Electricity 35.08 
Fuel 52.60 

195.68 195.68 

Heat and Light, G. A. R. Hall 

Janitor 240.00 
Gas and Electricity 19.70 
Fuel 162.85 
Repairs 45.15 
Supplies 23.55 



491.25 491.25 



1,252.60 1,252.60 



Blaney Street Widening 

Land Taking 105.00 105.00 105.00 

Trust Fund Custodian's Bond 
Premium 40.00 40.00 40.00 

Awards and Executions 
Callahan Claim ^ 400.00 
Cemetery Land ' 683.20 



1,083.20 1.083.20 



500.00 500.00 



Firemen's Memorial Sunday 

Band ' 121.00 

Flowers 52.00 
All other 23.15 

196.15 196.15 

Amount carried forward $498,141.83 



202 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



Amount brought forward $498,141.83 

District Nurse 

Swampscott Visiting Nurse Asso. $300.00 $300.00 300.00 

Unpaid Bills 

Water Department 250.00 250.00 250.00 

McDermott Bill 

Balance Due 163.97 163.97 163.97 

Care of Prisoners 

Paid City of Lynn 100.00 100.00 100,00 

Tercentenary 

Material for Floats 117.08 117.08 117.08 

Insurance 

Premiums 3,153.15 3,153.15 ^ 3,153.15 

Fourth of July 
Band 330.00 
Prizes 179.00 
Lights 23.02 
Erecting Stand 7.50 
Lumber 31.72 
Transportation 26.00 
Flags 40.00 
Water and Fountain 43.00 
Services 51.00 

731.24 731.24 

Legion Lease 

Lease 950.00 
Fuel 282.85 
Gas and Electricity 28.58 
Janitor's Services 88.57 

1,350.00 1,350.00 

Summary of Recreation and Unclassified 

Transfer 

Approp. From Expend. Balance 

Parks $8,500.00 $8,497.20 $2.80 

Heat and Light, V. F. W. Hall— 200.00 195.68 4.32 

Heat and Light, G. A. R. Hall 625.00 491.25 133.75 

Printing Town Reports 1,270.10 1,252.60 17.50> 

Blaney Street Widening 105.00 105.00 

Trust Fund Custodian's Bond 40.00 40.00 

Awards and Executions 1,083.20 1,083.20 

Memorial Day 500.00 500.00 

Firemen's Memorial Sunday 200.00 196.15 3.8S 

District Nurse 300.00 - 300.00 

Unpaid Bills 250.00 250.00 

McDermott Bill 163.97 163.97 

Care of Prisoners 100.00 100.00 

Tercentenary 200.00 117.08 82.92 

Insurance 3,153.15 — 3,153.15 

Fourth of July 1,000.00 731.24 268.76- 

Legion Lease 1,350.00 1,350.00 

Reserve Fund 5,000.00 $5,000.00 -. 

Total $24,040.42 $5,000.00 $18,526.52 $513.90 



Amount carried forward 



$504,307.27 



1929] 



ACCOUNTANT'S REPORT 



20S 



Amount brought forward 



$504,307.27 



ENTERPRISES 
Water Department 

Administration 

Commissioners $350.00 

Superintendent 2,600.00 

Clerks 1,595.00 

Stationery and Postage 17.42 

Printing and Advertising 125.50 

Telephone 64.27 

Loans 8,500.00 

Interest 3,555.00 

All other 63.98 

General 

Pipe and Fittings 4,716.03 

Meters and Fittings 1,528.55 

Freight 25.41 

Gasoline and Oil 266.41 

Auto Expense 293.41 

New Truck 738.00 

Medical Services 40.25 

Coal 147.50 

Light 25.80 

All other 853.33 

Service Connections 

Labor 2,330.66 

Pipe and Fittings 382.92 

All other 172.70 

Extensions 

Labor 307.53 
Labor 

Relaying Mains 1,486.58 

Meters 2,266.50 

Maintenance 2,839.96 

Metropolitan Water Assessment 

Loan Sinking Fund 917.55 

Interest on same 11,417.18 

Cost of Maintenance 4,867.59 

Serial Bonds 1,380.94 

Brookline Credit . 678.07 

Improvements, etc. 2,505.80 



Salaries and Wages 
Superintendent 
Labor 

Other Expenses 
Loam 
Shrubs 

Stone and Sand 
Tools 



Cemetery Department 

1,820.00 
2.222.50 



27.00 

200.92 
71.85 
56.31 



$16,871.17 



8,634.69 



2,886.28 
307.53 



6,593.04 



21,767.13 



57,059.84 



4,042.50 



Amount carried forward 



$561,367.11 



204 TOWN DOCUMENTS [Dec. 31 



Amount brought forward $561,367.11 
Telephone $30.89 
Auto Expense 69.62 
Water and Pipe 48.90 
All other 24.46 

$529.95 

4,572.45 

Land for Cemetery 

Land for Cemetery 2,016.80 2,016.80 2,016.80 

Cemetery Improvement 

Contractor 1,992.41 
Trees and Shrubs 133.53 
Advertising 7.60 
All other 6.00 

2,139.54 2,139.54 

Cemetery Truck 

Ford Truck 496.50 496.50 496.50 

Whitman Road Water 
Contractor 13.58 
Pipe 277.66 
Labor 268.95 
Advertising 2.94 

563.13 563.13 

Dukes Street Water 

Pipe 330.48 330.48 330.48 

Plymouth Avenue Water 

Contractor 645.00 
Labor 84.50 
Pipe 159.60 
Freight 28.49 
All other 28.06 

945.65 945.65 

Summary of Enterprises 

Appropriation Transfer to Expend. Balance 

Water - $61,955.00 $57,059.84 $4,895.16 

Cemetery 4,680.00 4,572.45 107.55 

Land for Cemetery 491.25 $1,525.55 2,016.80 

Cemetery Improvement 3,000.00 2,139.54 860.46 

Cemetery Truck 500.00 496.50 3.50 

Whitman Road Water 1,650.00 563.13 1,086.87 

Dukes Street Water 1,850.00 330.48 1,519.52 

Plymouth Avenue Water.. 1,325.00 .. 945.65 379.35 



Total $75,451.25 $1,525.55 $68,124.39 $8,852.41 

NON-REVENUE 
High School Committee 

Architect 800.00 800.00 800.00 

Emergency Water 
Pipe and Fittings 1,284.77 
Advertising 22.30 
Bates Road 480.26 
Commonwealth Avenue 151.38 
Atlantic Road 244.49 
Nason Road 180.50 

2,363.70 2,363.70 



Amount carried forward $575,595.36 



1929] 



ACCOUXTANT'S REPORT 



205 



Amount brought forward 



Barnstable Street 
Suffolk Avenue 
Franklin Avenue 
Morton Road 
Lawrence Road 
Francis Road 
Aspen Road 
King's Brook Culvert 
All other 



$575,595.36 



Emergency 



Sewer 

$101.78 
28.38 
300.00 
3,768.17 
48.79 
51.54 
177.04 
196.48 
56.48 



4,728.66 4,728.66 



Contractor 
Water 



Phillips Avenue Sewer 
2,863.86 
20.85 



2,884.71 



2,884.71 



Contractor 
Inspection 
Water 



Bradlee Avenue Sewer 

5,069.77 
23.33 
100.80 



5,193.90 5,193.90 



Contractor 
Castings 
Inspection 
Pipe 

Flushing 
All other 



Eastern Intercepting Sewer 

37,659.12 
118.15 
398.33 
43.20 
16.95 
38.70 



38,274.45 38,274.45 



Architect 
Contractor 
Furnishings 
All other 



Stanley School 

2,000.00 
83,676.97 
1,524.16 
25.35 



87,226.48 87,226.48 



Contractor 
Castings 



Drain, Humphrey Street 

3,467.87 
127.01 



3,594.88 



3,594.88 



Humphrey Street and Ocean Avenue Sewer 

Contractor 702.84 
Castings . 5.63 

Water 19.51 

727.98 



727.98 



Contractor 

Amount carried forward 



Bristol Avenue Sewer 
2,230.41 



2,230.41 2,230.41 



$720,456.83 



206 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



Amount brought forward 



$720,456.83 



Sargent Road and Prospect Avenue Sewer 



Contractor 
Castings 
Gravel 
Water 



Contractor 



Contractor 
Castings 
Inspection 
Pipe 

Dust and Gravel 
Lining up Saw 



$3,746.23 
18.52 
55.20 
24.96 



Barnstable Street Sewer 

1,325.89 

King's Brook Culvert 

11,493.99 
164.97 
160.00 
114.12 
276.70 
10.22 



Contractor 
Architect 
Vault Fittings 

Changing Sewer Connection 
Other Changes 
All other 



Town Hall Vault 

4,812.16 



325.38 
523.05 
130.26 
129.28 
46.33 



Contractor 

Architect 

Insurance 

Advertising 

Fixtures 



Contractor 
Engineering 



Highway Stable 

15,952.60 
966.90 
98.00 
12.60 
469.90 



Franklin Avenue 

10,878.48 
15.00 



$3,844.91 



1.325.89 



5,966.46 



3,844.91 
1.325.89 



12,220.00 12,220.00 



5,966.46 



17,500.00 17,500.00 



10,893.48 10,893.48 



Contractor 
Castings 
Inspection 
Curbstone 
Use of Roller 
All other 



Contractor 

Castings 

Advertising 



Monument Avenue and Walker Road 

15,643.35 
154.76 
81.67 
140.94 
150.00 
4.90 



Whitman Road Sewer 
1,630.16 
26.42 
15.75 



16,175.62 16,175.62 



1.672.33 



Amount carried forward 



1,672.33 
$790,055.52 



1929] 



ACCOUNTANT'S REPORT 207 



Amount brought forward $790,055.52 

Summary of Non-Revenue 

Balance from Transfer Transfer 

Previous Year to from Approp. Expend. Balance 

Redington St. School $801.90 $801.90 

High School Committee - -- $801.90 $800.00 $1.90 

Emergency Water 1,291.82 1,500.00 2,363.70 428.12 

Emergency Sewer 262.27 4,466.39 4,728.66 

Foster Rd. Water Main 3,000.00 3,000.00 

Franklin Ave. Sewer 5,851.36 5,851.36 1 

Phillips Ave. Sewer $4,800.00 2,884.71 1,915.29 

Fuller Ave. Sewer 605.97 605.97 

Bradlee Ave. Sewer 11,280.00 5,193.90 6,086.10 

Eastern Int. Sewer 9.06 9.06 50,760.00 .38,274.45 12,485.55 

Stanley School 109,000.00 87,226.48 21,773.52 

Drain, Humphrey St. 3,760.00 3,594.88 165.12 

Humphrey St. and 

Ocean Ave. Sewer 1,322.00 727.98 594.02 

Bristol Ave. Sewer 4,042.00 2,230.41 1,811.59 

Sargent Rd. and Pros- 
pect Ave. Sewer 4,230.00 3,844.91 385.09 

Barnstable St. Sewer 1,786.00 1,325.89 460.11 

King's Brook Culvert 12,220.00 12,220.00 

Town Hall Vault 6,000.00 5,966.46 33.54 

Highway Stable 17,500.00 17,500.00 

Franklin Avenue 893.48 10,000.00 10,893.48 

Monument Ave. and 

Walker Road 17,000.00 16,175.62 824.38 

Whitman Rd. Sewer _ 2,000.00 1,672.33 327.67 



Total $11,822.38 $7,661.77 $7,268.29 $255,700.00 $217,623.86 $50,292.00 

INTEREST, MATURING DEBT AND AGENCY 

Interest 

Loans in Anticipation of Revenue $8,866.30 
General Debt 12,457.50 
Sewer Loans 6,518.75 
T. B. Hospital Notes 1,960.00 



Debt 

General Debt Maturing 35,700.00 
Sewer Bonds Maturing 14,850.00 
T. B. Hospital Notes Maturing 4,000.00 
Loans in Anticipation of Revenue 300,000.00 



$29,802.55 29,802.55 



354.550.00 354.550.00 



Agency 

T. B. Hospital Assessment 5,834.29 
County Deficit 4,665.53 



Taxes 

State Tax 28,305.00 
County Tax 42,960.32 



State Enterprises 

State Highway 1,140.42 

Auditing, Municipal Accounts 824.33 

Snow Removal 47.40 



Charles River Basin 

Serial Bonds 66.74 

Interest 807.13 

Maintenance . 1,644.61 



10.499.82 



71,265.32 



2,012.15 



2.518.48 



Amount carried forward $1,174,408.07 



208 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



Amount brought forward 



$1,174,408.07 



Metropolitan Park 
Sinking Fund 
Serial Bonds 
Interest 
Maintenance 
Southern Traffic Route 
Northern Traffic Route 
Metropolitan Planning Board 

Veterans' Exemption 



Refunds 

1928 Personal Taxes, Overpaid 

1928 Real Estate Tax, Overpaid 

1929 Poll Tax Overpaid 
License Overpaid 
Excise Tax Refund 
Overlay, 1928 
Overlay, 1929 
National Bank Tax, 1926 
Trust Co. Tax, 1926 
Trust Co. Tax, 1928 
National Bank Tax, 1927 



Trust Funds 

Phillips Medal Fund 
Cemetery Lots 



$523.21 
549.36 

3,346.88 

9,539.64 
158.93 

1,668.50 
158.67 

35.19 



2.08 
12.00 
2.00 
4.00 
1,398.79 
45.00 
102.00 
.40 
2.16 
9.91 
.57 



40.99 
4,184.50 



Overpayments Later Reimbursed 

Damage Claim Later Reimbursed 28.45 

Overpayment Check Returned 552.94 

Overpayment Check Returned 90.00 



$15,995.19 
35.19 



102,326.15 



1.578.91 



4,225.49 



1,578.91 



4,225.49 



671.39 



Total Expenditures 



671.39 
$1,283,210.01 



TRANSFERS 



From Excess and Deficiency 

To Police Motorcycles $530.00 

To Police Side Cars 230.00 

To New F. A. Box, Stanley School 250.00 

To Hydrant Rental 1,000.00 

To New Hose 500.00 

To Essex Street Bridge 600.00 

To Danvers Street Bridge 800.00 

To Tercentenary 200.00 

To Puritan Park Streets 1,500.00 

To Crescent Street 250.00 

To Catch Basin, Puritan Road . 700.00 

To Catch Basin, Cherry Street 650.00 

To Manhole, Palmer's Pond 200.00 

To Drain, Aspen Road 2,500.00 

To Lewis Road 475.00 

To Nason Road 1,300.00 

To Cedar Road 475.00 



1929] 



ACCOUNTANT'S REPORT 



209 



From Excess and Deficiency 

To Francis Road $600.00 

To F. A. Box, Lewis Road 200.00 

To F. A. Box Harrison Avenue 200.00 

To McDermott Bill 163.97 

To County Deficit 4,665.53 

To Awards and Executions 1,083.20 

To Humphrey Street 5,000.00 

To Bay View Drive 3,500.00 

To Care of Prisoners 100.00 

To Fourth of July 1,000.00 

To Drain Humphrey Street 240.00 

To Eastern Intercepting Sewer 3,240.00 

To Philhps Avenue Sewer 300.00 

To Bradlee Avenue Sewer • 720.00 

To Humphrey St. and Ocean Ave. Sewer 78.00 

To Bristol Avenue Sewer 258.00 

To Sargent Rd. and Prospect Ave. Sewer 270.00 

To Barnstable Street Sewer 114.00 

To King's Brook Culvert 780.00 

To Monument Avenue and Walker Road 3,000.00 

To Franklin Avenue 3,000.00 



From Reserve Fund 

To Police 900.00 

To Emergency Water 1,500.00 

To Franklin Avenue 893.48 

To School Repairs 624.40 

To Fire Department, Pump Repairs 534.50 

To Forest Warden 82.95 

To Forest Warden 45.00 

To Public Welfare 240.81 

To Police 94.46 

To Soldiers' Relief 84.40 



From Premium on Notes and Bonds 

To General Debt Maturing 5,456.55 
From Municipal Insurance Fund Income 

To Insurance 2,133.45 
From Municipal Insurance Fund 

To Insurance 1,019.70 
From Cemetery Lots Fund Income 

To Cemetery Improvements 1,994.31 

To Cemetery Truck 500.00 
From Cemetery Lots Fund 

To Cemetery Improvements 1,005.69 
From Redington Street School 

To High School Committee 801.90 
From Franklin Avenue Sewer _ 

To Emergency Sewer 3,851.36 
From Fuller Avenue Sewer 

To Emergency Sewer 605.97 
From Eastern Intercepting Sewer 

To Emergency Sewer 9.06 



$40,672.70 



5,000.00 



17,377.99 



$63,050.69 



210 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



TOWN OF SWAMPSCOTT 
Balance Sheet, December 31, 1929 

Cash 

Petty Cash 

Uncollected Taxes 1927 Personal 



Uncollected Taxes 1928 Poll 
Uncollected Taxes 1928 Personal 
Uncollected Taxes 1928 Real Estate 

Uncollected Taxes 1929 Poll 
Uncollected Taxes 1929 Personal 
Uncollected Taxes 1929 Real Estate 

Uncollected Moth 1928 
Uncollected Moth 1929 

Uncollected Unapportioned Sidewalks 
Uncollected 1928 Sidewalks 
Uncollected 1929 Sidewalks 

Uncollected Unapportioned Sewers 
Uncollected 1929 Sewers 

Property Taken by Town for Taxes 
Tax Titles 

Water Accounts Receivable 1927 
Water Accounts Receivable 1928 
Water Accounts Receivable 1929 
Water Services 
Water Interest 



$552.24 

28.00 
740.64 
2,600.27 

94.00 

374.52 
82,657.90 

22.50 
322.50 

2,047.60 
82.87 
357.39 

3,141.04 
432.26 

255.35 
2,328.76 

3.48 
180.86 
12,842.68 
1,315.71 
424.86 



Departmental' Accounts Receivable, Health 1,383.26 

Departmental Accounts Receivable, School 199.00 
Departmental Accounts Receivable, Public 

Welfare 2,898.32 

Departmental Accounts Receivable, Cemetery 6.00 

Departmental Accounts Receivable, Highway 37.50 

Excise Tax on Motor Vehicles 3,400.44 

Soldiers' Relief 261.77 

Loans Authorized 3,000.00 



$208,959.06 
100.00 
552.24 



3,368.91 

83,126.42 
345.00 

2,487.86 
3,573.30 
2,584.11 

14,767.59 



4,524.08 
3,400.44 
261.77 
3,000.00 

$331,050.78 



Debt 



Net Bonded Debt 



776,300.00 



Trust Funds 

Securities and Cash 29,156.07 
Securities, Income and Interest 2,287.26 

$31,443.33 

Sidewalks and Sewers Apportioned but Not Due 3,339.85 $3,339.85 



1929] 



ACCOUNTANT'S REPORT 



211 



TOWN OF SWAMPSCOTT 
Balance Sheet, December 31, 1929 
Accounts Current 

1927 Taxes, Real Estate, Overcredited 

Excess and Deficiency 

Water Department Available Surplus 

Revenue 

Water Revenue $14,767.59 

Moth Revenue 345.00 

Sidewalks Revenue 2,487.86 

Sewer Revenue 3,573.30 

Tax Title Revenue 2,584.11 

Excise Revenue 3,400.44 
Departmental Accounts Receivable Revenue 4,524.08 

Overlay 1927 1,742.29 

Overlay, 1928 3,367.38 

Overlay, 1929 2,470.82 

Loans in Anticipation of Revenue 100,000.00 

Fire Alarm Extension 218.16 

Health 200.00 

Whitman Road Taking 291.05 

Whitman Road Construction 1,328.51 

Nason Road 625.44 

Burnett Fund 1,012.00 

Mary L. Thomson Library Fund Income 87.72 

Hastings' Land Taking 9,925.00 

Development of School Grounds 166.19 

Cemetery Improvement 860.46 

Cemetery Truck 3.50 

Whitman Road Water 1,086.87 

Dukes Street Water 1,519.52 

Plymouth Avenue Water 379.35 

General Debt Maturing 5,456.55 

Non-Revenue 

High School Committee 1.90 

Emergency Water 428.12 

Foster Road Water 3,000.00 

Franklin Avenue Sewer 1,915.29 

Bradlee Avenue Sewer 6,086.10 

Eastern Intercepting Sewer 12,485.55 

Stanley School 21,773.52 

Humphrey Street Drain 165.12 

Humphrey Street and Ocean Avenue Sewer 594.02 

Bristol Avenue Sewer 1,811.59 

Sargent Road and Prospect Avenue Sewei; 385.09 

Barnstable Street Sewer 460.11 

Town Hall Vault 33.54 

Monument Avenue and Walker Road 824.38 

Whitman Road Sewer Zll .dl 



$20.26 
83,339.35 
34,975.98 



162;423.19 



50,292.00 
$331,050.78 



Debt 

-Permanent Improvement Notes 
Sewer Bonds Serial 
Water Bonds Serial 
Tuberculosis Hospital Serial Loan 



$502,600.00 
147,700.00 
79,000.00 
47,000.00 



$776,300.00 



212 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



Trust Funds 

Ellen R. Whittle Library Fund $2,000.00 

Joanna Morse Library Fund 5,196.00 

Mary L. Thomson Library Fund 1,000.00 

Phillips Medal Fund 1,000.00 

Cemetery Lots Fund 17,077.77 

Municipal Insurance Fund 2,882.30 



Phillips Medal Fund, Income 1,366.37 
Municipal Insurance Fund, Income 226.71 
Cemetery Lots Fund, Income 694.18 



Apportioned 

Sidewalks $1,419.86 
Sewer 1,919.99 



$29,156.07 



2,287.26 
$31,443.33 



$3,339.85 



The following bills incurred by the departments named have been 
reported as unpaid up to date of January 5, 1930: 

Police $202.10 

Park 440.00 

Public Welfare 1,300.22 

Soldiers' Relief 139.50 

Engineering 20.76 



$2,102.58 



Respectfully submitted, 

HORACE R. PARKER, 

Town Accountant. 



1929] 



IN MEMORIAM 



213 



3tt mranrtam 



FRANCIS EDMUND INGALLS 

School Committee, March 9, 1878, to March 19, 1881; Decem- 
ber 1, 1890, to March 16, 1903. 

Board of Selectmen (Chairman), March 19, 1881, to March 
18, 1882. 

Trustee of Public Library, November 1, 1895, to January 
14, 1921. 

Registrar of Voters, June 23, 1884, to November 29, 1890. 
Died January 31, 1929. 



MILTON D. PORTER 

Registrar of Voters, June 23, 1884, to April 26, 1890. 
Town Clerk, March 21, 1898, to February 19, 1912. 

Died March 31, 1929. 



EDWARD TILLOTSON 

School Committee, February 16, 1914, to February 15, 1926; 
Chairman 1916-1926. 

Died March 11, 1929. 



ALFRED F. FRAZIER 

Park Commissioner, February 19, 1912, to February 18, 1918. 
Died August 14, 1929. 



FRED O. ELLIS 

Auditor, Alarch 14, 1868, to March 9, 1879. 
School Committee, April 8, 1878, to March 21, 1885. 
Trustee of Public Library, February 28, 1874, to February 
28, 1880. 

Died September 24, 1929. 



TOWN MEETING MEMBERS 

John E. Cunningham, Precinct One, Died May 28, 1929. 
Harry I. Illingworth, Precinct Five, Died October 31, 1929. 
Edward Tillotson, Precinct Five, Died March 11, 1929. 
Frank S. Newton, Precinct Six, Died November 18, 1929. 
Edward T. Brown, Precinct Eight, Died November 9, 1929. 
Clarence H. Holloway, Precinct Eight, Died March 4, 1929. 



214 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



Jury List 

Town of Swampscott— 1930 



In accordance with Section 9 of Chapter 234 of the General Laws,, 
the following jury list is published in the annual town report: 



Adams, Forest M. 
Ash, Charles G. 
Atwood, Joseph 
Baker, John M. 
Barnes, Roland C. 
Bartol, Harold H. 
fiassett, Herbert F. 
Beadle, Harvey H. 
Bentley, James D. 
Bickford, Frank I. 
Biggers, James M. 
Blackford, J. Hervey M. 
Blaisdell, Lennarde C. 
Blanchard, Philip A. 
Blaney, Harold C. 
Booma, Scott C. 
Bresnahan, Maurice T. 
Brickett, Paul W. 
Briggs, Leigh T. 
Brown, Chester A. 
Bunting, Elliott A. 
Burrill, Charles W. 
Butler, Frank A. 
Carr, Edward P. 
Carter, Thomas P. 
Caverly, Robert W. 
Chatman, William 
Coleman, Lewis A. 
Collins, Fred M. 
Condon, Everett E. 
Conrad, Kenneth L. 
Conway, Charles E. 
Corrow% Thomas 
Critcherson, Guy H. 
Crocker, Louis N. 
Curtis, Irving A. 
Curtis, Ralph 
Cutts, Guy W. 
Davis, Walter A. 
Delano, Clarence B. 
Doane, Leroy J. 
Doughty, Charles S. 
Doughty, Harold W. 
Durkee, Harold A. 
Enholm, Albert 
Etter, James F. 
Finch, Clarence M. 
Folsom, Frank H. 
Fox, John C. 
Frye, Roy H. 
Glendenning, John A. 



3 Sheridan rd. 

56 Greenwood ave. 
90 Aspen rd. 

32 Hampden st. 
177 Burrill st. 
48 Beach ave. 
12 Banks circle 

69 Stetson ave. 
15 Beach ave. 

137 Burrill st. 

80 Middlesex ave. 

36 Maple ave. 

12 Nason rd. 

25 Farragut rd. 

20 Norfolk ave. 
100 Stetson ave. 

48 Humphrey st. 

20 Outlook rd. 

30 Fuller ave. 

19 Middlesex ave. 

187 Humphrey st. 

34 Maple ave. 
163 Redington st. 

70 Paradise rd. 

68 Ocean View rd. 
25 Fuller ave. 

20 Ocean ave. 

6 Minerva st. 

31 Claremont ter. 

35 Grant rd. 
99 Stetson ave. 
48 Orchard rd. 

14 Shaw rd. 
30 Beach ave. 

106 Norfolk ave. 
122 Redington st. 

24 Bristol ave. 
100 Kensington lane 

45 Orchard rd. 

10 Stone court 
679 Humphrey st. 

57 Buena Vista st. 

15 Buena Vista st. 
2 Essex ter. 

15 Mapledale place 
54 Stetson ave. 
22 Thomas rd. 
168 Humphrey st. 

7 Fuller ave. 
2 Valley rd. 

188 Aspen rd. 



Insurance 

Salesman 

Insurance 

Engineer 

Accountant 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Trucking 

Treasurer 

Radio 

Salesman 

Salesman 

Undertaker 

Salesman 

Florist 

Shoe operator 

Banking 

Accountant 

Salesman 

Architect 

Leather dealer 

Civil engineer 

Inspector 

Home 

Salesman 

Manufacturer 

Retired 

Millwright 

Bookkeeper 

Engineer 

Salesman 

Retired 

Salesman 

Bookkeeper 

Shoe cutter 

Clerk 

Electrical contractor 

Builder 

Manufacturer 

Retired 

Salesman 

Salesman 

Hardware dealer 

Manufacturer 

Water worker 

Salesman 

Mechanical engineer 

Salesman 
Investments 
Shoemaker 
Tariff compiler 



1929] 



Goodwin, George E. 
Graham, Percy- 
Griffin, Hulbert C. 
Hardy, Elmer A. 
Hardy, Harry E. 
Hatch, Chester F. 
Hiland, J. Henry 
Holden, Horace G. 
Homan, John 
Hoover, Samuel S. 
Hutchinson, Harry G. 
Ingalls, Granville 
Johnson, Thomas C. 
Knowlton, Daniel F. 
Lewis, Gardner L. 
Linden, Fred E. 
Lofmark, Walter 
Lowell, Ernest W. 
Maddock, James R. 
Manchester, William D. 
Marsh, Clarence O. 
Marsh, Frank M. 
Marsh, William A. 
Mayor, William A. 
McCarty, James E. 
Merchant, John T. 
Monroe, John M. 
Morey, Robert L. 
Morrison, Frank E. 
Morse, Harold E. 
Parker, J. Edgar 
Perry, Willis C. 
Pevear, Selwyn R. 
Pope, Roger W. 
Ray, Walter M. 
Rideout, George F. 
Sutherland, Holton J. 
Sutherland, John H. 
Sutherland, William H. 
Underwood, Louis E. 
Willard, Arthur E. 
Woodbury, Wilbur L. 
Young, Edmund, Jr. 



JURY LIST 



60 Beach ave. 
11 Humphrey ter. 
29 Jessie st. 
84 Essex st. 

28 Orchard rd. 
26 Puritan rd. 

68 Aspen rd. 

6 Greenwood ave. 

69 Ocean View rd. 
129 Elmwood rd. 

66 Redington st. 
40 Burrill st. 
832 Humphrey st. 
22 Elmwood rd. 
1 Bond St. 
9 Hillcrest circle 
523 Humphrey st. 
11 Bay View Drive 

4 Farragut rd. 

17 Greenwood ter. 

7 Bay View Drive 
42 Essex ave. 

5 New Ocean st. 
9 Phillips circle 

134 Elmwood rd. 

29 Blaney st. 
4 Banks ter. 

199 Aspen rd. 

28 Bay View ave. 
292 Humphrey st. 

47 A^illett rd. 
168 Aspen rd. 
9 Bradlee ave. 

52 Bay View Drive 

49 Beach ave, 

19 Maple ave. 

10 Norfolk ave. 

10 Clark rd. 

16 Bond St. 

52 Burrill st. 
107 Redington st. 
1 Ellis ter. 

22 Stetson ave. 



215 



Cost estimator 

Teacher 

Manufacturer 

Salesman 

Builder 

Mechanic 

Teller 

Manager 

Engineer 

Salesman 

Painter 

Broker 

Leather 

Salesman 

Salesman 

Chemist 

Garage 

Agent 

Sales agent 

Civil engineer 

Clerk 

Salesman 

Grocer 

Electrical engineer 

Radio 

Manager 

Foreman 

Engineer 

Contractor 

Contractor 

Manufacturer 

Salesman 

Salesman 

Plumber 

Merchant 

Salesman 

Manufacturer 

Manufacturer 

Builder 

Electrical engineer 
Civil engineer 
Salesman 
Clerk 



216 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



Town Warrant 

Monday, February 17th, 1930 



Essex, ss. 

To either of the Constables of the town of Swampscott in said County: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts you are di- 
rected to notify the inhabitants of the town of Swampscott, qualified 
to vote in elections and in town affairs, to assemble in their respective 
precincts, in said Swampscott, on Monday, the seventeenth day of Feb- 
ruary, at 6 A. M., then and there to act on the following articles, viz.: 

At the close of the election the meeting shall adjourn to Monday, 
February 24, 1930, at 7:30 P. M., at the Town Hall. 

Article 1. To choose a Moderator for one (1) year. 
To choose a Town Clerk for one (1) year. 
To choose three members of the Board of Selectmen for one 
(1) year. 

To choose a Town Treasurer for one (1) year. 
To choose one member of the Board of Assessors for three 
(3) years. 

To choose a Collector of Taxes for one (1) year. 
To choose two members of the School Committee for three 
(3) years. 

To choose one member of the Board of Public Welfare for 

three (3) years. 
To choose one member of the Board of Health for three (3) 

years. 

To choose one member of the Water and Sewerage Board for 
three (3) years. 

To choose one member of the Park Commission for three 
(3) years. 

To choose one member of the Board of Trustees of the Public 
Library for three (3) years. 

To choose a Surveyor of Highways for three (3) years. 

To choose one Tree Warden for one (1) year. 

To choose three Constables for one (1) year. 

To choose one member of the Board of Commissioners of 
Trust Funds for three (3) years. 

To choose six (6) representative town meeting members in 
each precinct for three (3) years. 

To choose one representative town meeting member from 
Precinct Three for two (2) years, to fill vacancy. 

To choose one representative town meeting member from Pre- 
cinct Five for one (1) year, to fill vacancy. 

To choose one representative town meeting member from Pre- 
cinct Six for two (2) years, to fill vacancy. 

To choose one representative town meeting member from Pre- 
cinct Six for one (1) year, to fill vacancy. 

To choose one representative town meeting member from Pre- 
cinct Seven for one (1) year, to fill vacancy. 

To choose one representative town meeting member from Pre- 
cinct Eight for two (2) years, to fill vacanc3^ 

To choose one representative town meeting member from Pre- 
cinct Eight for one (1) year, to fill vacancy. 

All to be chosen on one ballot. 



1929] 



TOWN WARRANT 



217 



Art. 2. To hear and act on the reports of town officials, boards 
and committees. • j r a- 

Art. 3. To see what amount of bonds will be required of the i own 
Clerk and Custodian of Trust Funds for the ensuing year. 

Art. 4. To see what action the town will take in relation to salaries 
of town officials for the ensuing year. 

Art. 5. To see if the town will authorize the Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money, from time to time, in 
anticipation of the revenue of the financial year, beginning January 1, 
1930, and to issue a note or notes therefor, payable within one year, the 
debt or debts incurred thereby to be paid from the revenue of said 
financial year. 

Art. 6. To see what action the town will take in relation to the 
recommendations not calling for the appropriation of money, as con- 
tained in the reports of officers, boards or committees. 

Art. 7. To see what action the town will take in relation to the 
recommendations calling for the appropriation or expenditure of money, 
the creation of a debt, or the disposition of town property, as set forth 
in the reports of officers, boards or committees. 

Art. 8. To see what action the town will take in relation to the 
appropriation of money for departmental and other expenses as recom- 
mended and set forth on pages 162 and 163 of the annual town report. 

Art. 9. To see what action the town will take in relation to the 
appropriation or raising of money for permanent street construction. 

Art. 10. To see if the town will vote to resurface Puritan road 
from the Administration Building to the New Ocean House with some 
kind of pavement and appropriate money therefor, as recommended by 
the Survej^or of Highways. 

Art. 11. To see if the town will vote to resurface that portion of 
Humphrey street between Commonwealth avenue and Glen road and 
appropriate mone}^ therefor, as recommended by the Surveyor of High- 
ways. 

Art. 12. To see if the town will vote to resurface that part of 
Humphrey street, from the Ljmn line to Blaney street, with some kind 
of pavement and appropriate money therefor, as recommended by the 
Surveyor of Highways. 

Art. 13. To see if the town will vote to rebuild culverts on Salem 
street and appropriate mone}- therefor, as recommended by the Sur- 
veyor of Highways. 

Art. 14. To see if the town will vote to abate the water nuisance 
now existing at Atlantic avenue and Bradlee avenue and appropriate 
money therefor, as recommended by the Surveyor of Highways. 

Art. 15. To see if the town will vote to abate the surface water 
condition now existing on Phillips avenue and appropriate mone}^ there- 
for, as recommended by the Surveyor of Highways. 

Art. 16. To see if the town will vote to enlarge pipe drain to 
Palmer Pond, build three manholes and tide gate and appropriate money 
therefor, as recommended b}' the Surveyor of Highways. 

Art. 17. To see if the town will vote to build a fence on Essex 
street, near the L^'-ons estate, and appropriate money therefor, as recom- 
mended by the Surveyor of Highways. 

Art. 18. To see if the town will vote to lay a granolithic sidewalk 
from Phillips corner to Marblehead line, on the northerlv side of 
Atlantic avenue, and appropriate money therefor, as recommended by 
the Surveyor of Highways. 

Art. 19. To see if the town will vote to remove the old buildings 
at the Highway Stable yard, build storage shed and appropriate money 
therefor, as recommended by the Surveyor of Highways. 

Art. 20. To see if the town will vote to accept Barnstable street 
as a public way as laid out by the Board of Selectmen in accordance 
with a plan made by W. W. Pratt, town engineer, and appropriate 
money therefor, as petitioned for by James H. Sisk et als. 



218 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



Art. 21. To see if the town will vote to accept Plymouth avenue 
as a public way, as laid out by the Board of Selectmen, in accordance 
with a plan made by W. W. Pratt, town engineer, and appropriate 
money therefor, as petitioned for by James H. Sisk et als. 

Art. 22. To see if the town will vote to accept Bay View drive as 
a public way, as laid out by the Board of Selectmen, in accordance with 
a plan made by W. W. Pratt, town engineer, and to appropriate money 
therefor, as petitioned for by James W. Santry et als. 

Art. 23. To see if the town will vote to accept Stanley road as a 
public \\a.y, as laid out by the Board of Selectmen, in accordance with 
a plan made by W. W. Pratt, town engineer, and to appropriate money 
therefor, as petitioned for by Ralph W. Reeve et als. 

Art. 24. To see if the town will vote to accept Commonwealth ave- 
nue as a public way, as laid out by the Board of Selectmen, in accord- 
ance with a plan made by W. W. Pratt, town engineer, and to appro- 
priate money therefor, as petitioned for by Luigi Gallo et als. 

Art. 25. To see if the town will vote to accept Ocean avenue as a 
public way as laid out by the Board of Selectmen, in accordance with a 
plan made by W. W. Pratt, town engineer, and to appropriate money 
therefor, as petitioned for by Abigail F. Curran et als. 

Art. 26. To see if the town will vote to accept Prospect avenue 
as a public w^ay, as laid out by the Board of Selectmen, in accordance 
with a plan made by W. W. Pratt, town engineer, and to appropriate 
money therefor, as petitioned for by Ethel K. Sherburne et als. 

Art. 27. To see if the town will vote to accept Minerva street as 
a public way, as laid out b}^ the Board of Selectmen, in accordance with 
a plan drawn by W. W. Pratt, t6wn engineer, dated January, 1927, and 
filed with the office of the Town Clerk, and appropriate money therefor, 
as petitioned for by William F. Healy et als. 

Art. 28. To see if the town will locate, lay out and appropriate 
the necessary money to build a public way, running from the northerly 
side of Humphrey street, between land of French and Matera, and 
thence running, at a width of 50 feet part of the way, and continuing 
at a width of 20 feet between other lands of French, Ward, and Dichiri- 
co, to Kensington lane, so-called, as petitioned for by Joseph Cardillo 
et als. 

Art. 29. To see if the town will vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to sell the old stone crusher plant and boiler now located at 
the Highway Stable yard. 

Art. 30. To see if the town will vote to construct Whitman road, 
from its present terminus across land recently acquired by the town, 
to Forest avenue, and appropriate money therefor. 

Art. 31. To see if the town will vote to construct a granolithic side- 
walk on the southerly side of Orchard road, from Humphrey street to 
Whitman road and on the southerly side of Whitman road, from Or- 
chard road to the w^alk leading to the new Stanley school, and appro- 
priate money therefor. 

Art. 32. To see if the town will vote to lay a drain so as to take 
care of the surface water from catch basin on Roy street, and appro- 
priate money therefor, as petitioned for by Lena E. Estes et als. 

Art. 33. To see if the town will vote to abate the surface water 
condition now existing on the northerly side of Humphrey street, in the 
vicinity of Commonwealth avenue, and appropriate money therefor. 

Art. 34. To see if the town will vote to remove a section of ledge 
on the southerly side of Buena Vista street for the purpose of widening 
said street, and appropriate money therefor. 

Art. 35. To see if the town will determine and designate sections 
for the purpose of averaging and assessing the cost of particular sewers, 
in accordance with provisions of Section 3 of Chapter 401 of the Acts 
of 1903; such sections to be in accordance with the plan drawn by the 
Town Engineer, or in such other manner as the town may vote. 



1929] 



TOWN WARRANT 



219 



Art. 36. To see if the town will vote to authorize and instruct the 
Board of Selectmen to petition the legislature for appropriate legisla- 
tion, by the amendment of Chapter 86 of the Acts of 1902, or otherwise, 
for the purpose of increasing the sewer assessments, from main sewers, 
to an amount not exceeding 50% of the cost. 

Art. 37. To see if the town will authorize and instruct the Board 
of Selectmen to petition the legislature for appropriate legislation, by^ 
amendment of Chapter 401 of the Acts of 1903, or otherwise, to change' 
the assessment for particular sewers. 

Art. 38. To see if the town will vote to construct a sewer in Denni- 
son avenue, Stearns street, Stearns street extension, Harrison avenue, 
Salem street, Humphrey street and Aycliffe road, a distance of 2880 
feet, and appropriate money therefor, as petitioned for by James Donlan 
et als and recommended by the Water and Sewerage Board and Board 
of Health. 

Art. 39. To see if the town will vote to construct a sewer in Min- 
etva street, Eastman avenue, Fairview avenue and Barnstable street, a 
distance of 2350 feet, and appropriate money therefor, as recommended 
by the Water and Sewerage Board and Board of Health. 

Art. 40. To see if the town will vote to construct a sewer in Ken- 
sington lane, Lewis road and Curry circle, a distance of 1440 feet, and 
appropriate money therefor, as recommended by the Water and Sewer- 
age Board and Board of Health. 

Art. 41. To see if the town will vote to construct a sewer in Cros- 
man avenue, Humphrey street, Bellevue road. Beach Bluff avenue, 
Clark road, Manton road, Eulow street, Mostyn street, Stanwood road, 
Phillips avenue and Humphrey street, a distance of 7250 feet, and appro- 
priate money therefor, as recommended by the Water and Sewerage 
Board and Board of Health. 

Art. 42. To see if the town will vote to construct a sewer in 
Crosman avenue. Linden avenue, Stanley road, Sumner road and Dale 
street a distance of 2810 feet, and appropriate money therefor, as peti- 
tioned for by Fred A. Hale et als. 

Art. 43. To see if the town will vote to construct a sewer in Nason 
road, a distance of 450 feet, and appropriate money therefor, as peti- 
tioned for by James Nason et als. 

Art. 44. To see if the town will vote to construct a sewer from 
Rockland street to King street and appropriate money therefor, as peti- 
tioned for by Alvin P. Johnson. 

Art. 45. To see if the town will vote to construct a sewer in 
Charlotte road, for a distance of 225 feet, and appropriate money there- 
for, as petitioned for by S. Louis Eigner et als. 

Art. 46. To see if the town will vote to extend the sewer in Bates 
road, a distance of 240 feet, and appropriate money therefor, as peti- 
tioned for by S. Louis Eigner et als. 

Art. 47. To see if the town will vote to construct a sewer in 
Stanley road, a distance of approximately 500 feet, and appropriate 
money therefor, as petitioned for by William D. Rowe et als. 

Art. 48. To see if the town will vote to construct a sewer in Pitman 
road and appropriate money therefor, as petitioned for by Frank H. 
Humphrey et als. 

Art. 49. To see if the town will vote to extend King's Brook cul- 
vert 280 feet to Cherry street, and appropriate money therefor, as 
recommended by the Water and Sewerage Board. 

Art. 50. To see if the town w^ll make an appropriation of money 
for the purpose of co-operating with others to relocate Hawthorne 
brook, between Humphrey street and the right of way of the Boston 
& Maine Railroad, lowering the grade thereof, confining said brook to 
said relocation, and enlarging the passageway of said brook under said 
railroad, or what it will do in relation thereto, as petitioned for by 
Charles D. C. Moore et als. 



220 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



Art. 51. To see if the town will vote to transfer the following un- 
expended balances on sewer construction to the sewer emergency fund, 
as recommended by the Water and Sewerage Board: Phillips avenue 
sewer, $1,915.29; Bradlee avenue sewer, $6,086.10; Eastern Intercepting 
Sewer, $12,485.55; Humphrey street and Ocean avenue sewer, $594.02; 
Bristol avenue sewer, $1,811.59; Sargent road and Prospect avenue 
sewer, $385.09; Whitman road sewer, $90.26; Barnstable street sewer, 
$460.11. 

Art. 52. To see if the town will vote to lay a six-inch water main 
in Allan road, a distance of 650 feet from Humphrey street, and appro- 
priate money therefor from the Water Available Surplus, as recom- 
mended by the Water and Sewerage Board. 

Art. 53. To see if the town will vote to lay a six-inch water main 
in Stanley road, a distance of 580 feet from Humphrey street, and 
appropriate money therefor from the Water Available Surplus, as 
recommended by the Water and Sewerage Board. 

Art. 54. To see if the town will vote to lay a six-inch water main 
in Dale street, a distance of 590 feet, and appropriate money therefor 
from the Water Available Surplus, as recommended by the Water and 
Sewerage Board. 

Art. 55. To see if the town will vote to lay a six-inch water main 
in Nason road, a distance of 200 feet, and appropriate money therefor 
from the Water Available Surplus, as recommended by the Water and 
Sewerage Board. 

Art. 56. To see if the town will vote to lay a six-inch water main 
in Hampshire street, a distance of 285 feet, and appropriate money 
therefor from the Water Available Surplus, as recommended by the 
Water and Sewerage Board. 

Art. 57. To see if the town will vote to lay a six-inch water main 
in Charlotte road, a distance of 225 feet, and appropriate money therefor, 
as petitioned for by S. Louis Signer et als. 

Art. 58. To see if the town will vote to transfer the following un- 
expended balances from water construction to emergency water fund, 
as recommended by the Water and Sewerage Board: W^hitman road 
water, $1,086.87; Plymouth avenue water, $379.35. 

Art. 59. To see if the town will vote to increase the salaries of 
the Water and Sewerage Commissioners as follow^s: Chairman to $500; 
two associates to $300 each, as recommended by the Water and Sewer- 
age Board. 

Art. 60. To see if the town will authorize the appointment of two 
additional patrolmen on the police force and appropriate mone}^ therefor, 
as recommended by the Chief of Police. 

Art. 61. To see if the town will vote to furnish the captains and 
patrolmen in the police department with blue uniforms and appropriate 
the sum of $650 therefor, as recommended by the Chief of Police. 

Art. 62. To see if the town will vote to exchange the two Ford 
roadsters for a new Ford sedan, and that the sum of $175 be appro- 
priated therefor as recommended by the Chief of Police. 

Art. 63. To see if the town will vote to exchange the Studebaker 
touring car for a new one, and that the sum of $1200 be appropriated 
therefor, as recommended by the Chief of Police. 

Art. 64. To see if the town will vote to appropriate $180 to pur- 
chase and install a fire alarm box at the corner of Berkshire street and 
Paradise road, as recommended by the Board of Fire Engineers. 

Art. 65. To see if the town will vote to appropriate $150 to pur- 
chase and install a fire alarm box on Humphrey street at Hemingway 
road, as recommended by the Board of Fire Engineers. 

Art. 66. To see if the town will vote to give to the Board of Fire 
Engineers permission to dispose of the old service car as part payment 
on another machine to take "its place, as recommended by the Board 
of Fire Engineers. 



1929] 



TOWN WARRANT 



221 



Art. 67. To see if the town will vote to appropriate $500 for 500 
feet of 2^ inch hose, as recommended by the Board of Fire Engineers. 

Art. 68. To see if the town wnll vote to appropriate $400 for new 
batteries at the Central Fire Station for the Fire Alarm System, as 
recommended by the Board of Fire Engineers. 

Art. 69. To see if the town will vote to appropriate $5,000 for 
further improving the Fire Alarm System, displacing part of the present 
overhead construction, by underground cables with necessary loops^ 
connections and changes, as recommended by the Board of Fire Engi- 
neers. 

Art. 70. To see if the town will vote to appropriate $1,000 for 
hydrant rental, as recommended by the Board of Fire Engineers. 

Art. 71. To see if the town will vote to establish the following 
yearly rate of salaries in the Fire Department: Deputy Chief, $2,430; 
three captains at $2,265 each; privates, first year, $1,900; second year, 
$2,000; third year and thereafter, $2,100 per year, and appropriate the 
sum of $1,865 to cover same, to be retroactive to January 1, 1930, as 
petitioned for by George H. Lanipard et als. 

Art. 72. To see if the town will authorize and instruct the Board 
of Selectmen to petition the legislature for authority to borrow from 
time to time, within a period of five years from the passage of the act^ 
in excess of the statutory limit of indebtedness, such sums as may be 
necessary, not exceeding in the aggregate $500,000 for the purpose of 
constructing a new high school building and originally equipping and 
furnishing the same, and to issue notes or bonds of the town therefor^ 
as recommended by the High School Committee. 

Art. 73. To see if the town will authorize and instruct the Board 
of Selectmen to petition the legislature for authority to discontinue as a 
public park the use of the land on Humphrey street, commonly known 
as Phillips Park, and to erect thereon a public high school, and to use 
the same generally for public school purposes, and to place the same 
under the jurisdiction of the School Committee of the town of Swamp- 
scott, as recommended by the High School Committee. . 

Art. 74. To see if the town will vote to continue the ensuing year 
the present High School Building Committee, with power in the Mod- 
erator to fill vacancies therein. Said committee to investigate and con- 
sider matters that may arise from time to time in connection with ques- 
tion of establishing a new high school building, and what use, if any^ 
may be made of the present high school building for any other purpose, 
and to report thereon to the town, as recommended by the High School 
Committee. 

Art. 75. To see if the town will authorize the Finance Committee 
to study the present high school building to determine whether it can be 
efficiently used for high school needs by making changes therein and 
additions thereto; and further, to see if the town will appropriate money 
for such study, as petitioned for by James W. Santry. 

Art. 76. To see if the town will appropriate the sum of $3,986 to be 
expended for repairs upon the school buildings of the town, as peti- 
tioned for by the School Committee. 

Art. 77. To see if the town will appropriate the sum of $1,000 to 
be expended for the development of the grounds about the Machon 
School, as petitioned for by the School Committee. 

Art. 78. To see if the town will vote to build a wire fence at the 
Stanley School, fence to be 6 feet high and 110 feet long with posts 
set in cement bases, and appropriate $1,000 therefor, as petitioned for 
by Harry E. Hardy et als. 

Art. 79. To see if the town will vote to authorize the Trustees of 
the Public Library to make changes in, and additions to, the library 
building, and further to see if the town will vote to appropriate money 
for such changes and additions, as recommended by said trustees in 
their annual report for the year 1929. 

Art. 80. To see if the town will vote that German police dogs and 
Aire4ale dogs be restrained while upon the streets. 



222 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



Art. 81. To see if the town will vote permission to the \'eterans 
of Foreign Wars, Joseph L. Stevens Post 1240, to occup}' the old hall 
on Pine street, now in possession of the G. A. R., and make the neces- 
sar\- appropriation for its maintenance, as petitioned for by Leo P. 
Caproni et als. 

Art. 82. To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate a 
sum of money for the eradication of mosquitoes, the same to be spent 
under Chap. 252 of the General Laws, as amended by Chap. 457, Acts 
of 1923, and subsequent amendments, especially Chap. 288 of the Acts 
of 1929. 

Art. 83. To see if the town will vote to appoint a committee to 
make a comprehensive study as to the advisability of the town accept- 
ing or providing for a town manager, and appropriate money for said 
committee to pursue said investigation, and report their findings at a 
subsequent town meeting. 

Art. 84. To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law 
of the town so that all that land on the ocean side of Humphre}' street, 
between King's Beach and Blane}' Beach, may be zoned as a business 
district, as petitioned for b}- Ellen M. Wardwell et als. 

Art. 85. To see if the town will vote that portion of the land known 
as Phillips Gardens, as shown on a plan drawn by Philip J. Leary, civil 
engineer, and bounded by Bates road, Charlotte road, Phillips park, and 
land of Vorenberg, be transferred from a single residence district to 
a two family district on the zone map of the town, so as to make the 
same conform to the remainder of the land shovrn on the above men- 
tioned plan, as petitioned for by S. Louis Eigner et als. 

Art. 86. To see if the town will vote to formally dedicate Abbott 
Park with appropriate military exercises and appropriate monev there- 
for. 

Art. 87. io see if the town will vote to instruct the Park Com- 
mission to erect fences along the sidewalk lines of all playgrounds in 
the town, in the interest of public safety and appropriate money therefor, 
as recommended by the Chief of Police. 

Art. 88. To see if the town will vote to appoint a committee to con- 
sider plans and details and to suggest a proper location for a permanent 
Honor Roll to replace the present Honor Roll on the Town Hall lawn, 
said committee to consist of the Commander of the American Legion, 
the Commander of the Veterans of Foreign Wars and one represen- 
tative town meeting member, said committee to report at a subsequent 
town meeting. 

Art. 89. To see if the town will vote to continue in existence the 
present bj'-law committee appointed under Article 6 of the warrant for 
the annual town meeting of 1929, with authority to consider revisions 
of and amendments to the by-laws and report to the town from time to 
time, such report to be made not later than the next annual town meet- 
ing. 

Art. 90. To see if the town will vote to appropriate the sum of 
three thousand six hundred fifteen dollars and sixty-four cents 
($3,615.64), said sum being the portion of the expense incurred in the 
construction of an addition to the Essex County Tuberculosis Hospital 
and apportioned by the County Commissioners upon the inhabitants 
of the town of Swampscott. 

Art. 91. To see if the town will vote to appropriate the sum of one 
thousand dollars ($1,000) for the proper observance of Fourth of Juh- 
and that the Moderator be empowered to appoint a committee of three 
to arrange and carry out such celebration. 

Art. 92. To see if the town will vote to reimburse Arthur C. Lewis 
the amount claimed to have been paid b}- him in excess of the amount 
rightfully due as 1924 taxes on lots 46, 47, 48 and 49, Plate 22 of the 
Assessors' plans, and appropriate mone}- therefor. 

Art. 93. To appropriate and raise by borrowing or otherwise, under 
any general or special law which authorizes the town to raise money 



1929] 



TOWN WARRANT 



223 



b}- borrowing or otherwise, such sum or sums of money as may be 
necessary for any or all of the purposes mentioned in the foregoing 
articles. 

The polls will close at 6 P. M. 

And \'ou are directed to serve this warrant b}* posting an attested 
copy thereof at the town hall, the post offices, at least one public and 
conspicuous place in each precinct in the town, and at or in the imme- 
diate vicinity of each railroad station in the town, seven days before 
the day appointed for said meeting. 

Hereof fail not, and make due return of this warrant, with j^our 
doings thereon, to the Town Clerk at the time and place of meeting 
aforesaid. 

Given under our hands this seventeenth day of January, A. D. 1930. 

HOWARD K. GLIDDEN, 
R. WYER GREENE, 
DANIEL F. KNOWLTON, 

Selectmen of Swampscott. 

A true copy. Attest: 

FRANK H. BRADFORD. Constable. 



224 



TOWN DOCUMENTS 



[Dec. 31 



Swampscott Fire Alarm Boxes 

Always pull a box for fire in a building instead of using the phone if the box is 
\\-ithin reasonable distance. 

(Corrected to January 1, 1930) 



Box 

13 
14 

15 
16 

17 
112 
113 
114 
115 
121 
122 
123 
124 

125 
*131 
*132 
21 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
212 
213 
*214 
241 
*242 
31 
32 
34 
35 
36 
37 
* 38 
312 
313 
324 
331 
332 
*334 
*335 
*341 
342 
t 41 
f- 42 
f 43 
f 45 
f 46 
r 47 



Location Box 

Mountwood Rd. 412 

Humphrey opp. Pump Station *413 

Puritan Rd. near Orient Ct.- '^414 

Puritan Rd. opp. Galloupe's "^415 

Point Rd. 421 

Highland near King 422 

Farraeut cor. Ellis Rd. 5 

Town Hall 51 

Sheridan opp. Elmwood Rd. 52 

Park Bldg. Fisherman's Beach 53 

Thomas cor. Elmwood Rd. 54 

Walker near Devens Rd. 512 

Walker and Brewster Ter. 513 

Greenwood Ave. cor. Bay View 514 

Ave. *515 
Greenwood Ave. opp. High Sch. 

Banks. Farragut and State Rd. 521 

State Rd. and Berkshire St. 522 

Junct. Sher'n, Andrew, Farragut 523 

Engine House, Phillips Ave. 531 

Monument Sq. *532 

Humphrey. Atlantic, Puritan Rd. 6 

Humphrey opp. Glen Rd. *621 

Rockland. Head of Rose * 7 

Sargent Rd. opp. Prospect Ave. * 71 

Forest Ave. and Aspen Rd. *712 

Fuller and Bond St. 8 
Banks, Devens Rd.. Red'gton St. 
Hadley School, Redington St. 
Humphrey opp. Shore Drive 
Atlantic and Phillips Aves. 
Humphrey opp. Beach Bluff Ave. 
Opp. 279 Humphrey St. 
Beach Bluff Ave. cor. Eulow St. 
Humphrey opp. St. John's Ch. 
Plummer and Atlantic 
Whitnev Est. Forest Ave. 
Millet Rd. and Ocean View Rd. 
Orchard Rd. 

Little's Point near Steam's Est. 
New Ocean House (private) 
Puritan Rd. cor. Woodbine Ave. 

Galloupe's Point 315 

Tupelo Rd. 317 

Gale Estate 318 

Puritan Rd. opp. Ent. Little's Pt. 321 

Mountain Park 322 
Camp Progress 

State Rd. to Salem St. 323 

Phillip cor. to Galloupe's Point 346 

Banks Rd. and Forest Ave. 347 

Foster's Dam 371 
t Woods Fire Calls. 



Location 

Humphrev St. cor. Harrison Ay. 
Beach Bluff Ave. & Moystin St 
Phillips and Bradlee Ave. 
Atlantic and Palmer Ave. 
Kensington Lane opp. Lewis Rd. 
Stanley School 

Engine House, New Ocean St 
Essex cor. Essex Ave. 
Essex near Danvers St. 
Cor. Beach and Mountain Ave. 
Roy St. near Hillside 
Burrill cor. Railroad Ave. 
Hillside Ave. cor. Cherry 
Machon School, Burpee lR.d. 
Essex and Green way near Texas 

Oil Yard 
Middlesex Ave. cor. Berkshire 
Clarke School, Middlesex Ave. 
Pine, Superior St. 
Essex St. opp. Elm Place 
Norfolk and Stetson Ave. 
Stetson opp. Franklin Ave. 
State Rd. and Salem St 
Park and Windsor Ave. 
Windsor Ave. and Nichols St 
Junct. Foster Rd. & Foster Ter. 
Jessie St., Mountain Park 



SPECIAL SIGNALS 



721 
1-1 
3-3 



Call to Lvnn 
All Out S'ignal 
Police Call 
10-10 Out of Town Signal 
57 American Legion Call 



LYNN BOXES ON FIRST ALARM 

Michigan Ave. cor. Seymour Ave. 
Ocean cor. New Ocean 
Lewis St. Chemical House 
Columbia Ave., Standard Oil Co. 
Sanderson Ave., Herrick's Fac- 
tory- 
Empire cor. Brookline 
Ocean cor. Prescott Rd. 
Ocean St. cor. Kimball Rd. 
Essex near Bessom 
* (Imaginary Boxes) 



1929] INDEX 225 



Index 



Reports of Departments and Committees 

Page 

Animals, Inspector of 142 

Appropriations Recommended ... 44 

Appropriations \'oted 50 

Assessors .......... 164 

Board of Appeals 151 

Black Will s Clitt. taking of 56 

Building Inspector 112 

By-Laws Amended ....... 52 

Cemetery, Superintendent of . 140 

Dental Clinic .... ... 125 

Dog Officer 133 

Election, Town .......... 21 

Finance Committee. Reports of . .... . 10-24-32-33 

Fire Alarm Boxes . ...... 224 

Fire Engineers ...... 134 

Forest Warden 147 

Health, Board of 113 

Health Officer 114 

Health Nurse 126 

High School, Committee on ...... . 104 

Highway Surveyor ...... 143 

Highwav Stable Committee 145 
Jury Li'st ... .214 

Library. Trustees of . . lAl-^ 

Milk Inspector ... 121 

Moth Superintendent . 147 

Park Commissioners . .. 145 

Plumbmg, Inspector of ... 125 

Police ......... 136 

Public Welfare 127 

Selectmen, Board of 157 

School Attendance . Ill 

School Committee ...... 93 

School Costs 99 

Slaughtering. Inspector of 126 

Stanley School Building Committee .... 155 

Town Accountant .......... 177 

Town Budget ....... 162 

Town Clerk's Records ........ 9 

Town Clerk's Statistics ......... 65 

Town Committees Appointed ...... 8 

Town Counsel ........ 153 

Town Engineer ......... 149 

Town Meeting Members ........ 3 

Town Officers Appointed ....... 6 

Town Officers Elected ........ 2 

Town Warrant, Januarj- 16. 1929 9 

Town Warrant, Febmarv 18. 1929 14 

Town Warrant, March 25, 1929 30 

Town Warrant. April 16. 1929 62 

Town Warrant, February 17, 1930 216 

Tree Warden 148 

Wate- and Sewerage Board 128 

Weights and Measures 150 

Wires. Inspector of 140 



226 TOWN DOCUMENTS (Dec. 31 



Financial Reports 

Page 

Accountant's Department ........ 182 

Assessors' Department ......... 183 

Balance Sheets . . . . . . . . 78-91-210-211 

Borrowing Capacity . . 171 

Cemetery 203 

Collector of Taxes 174-183 

County Tax 207 

Dental Clinic 190 

Eastern Intercepting Sewer 205 

Election and Registration 184 

Engineering Department ........ 184 

Fire Department .......... 186 

Forest Warden 188 

Health Department . 188 

Highway Department . . ' . . . . . . . 192 

Interest and Maturing Debt ........ 207 

Law Department 183 

Legislative 181 

Liabilities 168 

Library 199 

Memorial Day .......... 201 

Metropolitan Assessments . . 208 

Moth Extermination ......... 187 

Notes Payable 167 

Park Department 200 

Police Department .......... 185 

Public Welfare 196 

School Department 197 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 187 

Selectmen's Department . 182 

Sewer Department ... 189 

Sewer Notes and Bonds 169 

State Aid 197 

State Audit 66-81 

State Tax 207 

Statistics (1887-1929) 165 

Street Lighting 193 

Town Clerk's Department ........ 183 

Town Debt 171 

Town Hall Department 184 

Transfers 47-180-208 

Treasurer's Report . . . . . . . . . 166 

Treasurer's Department ........ 182 

Treasurer's Receipts ......... 177 

Tree Warden 187 

Trust Funds . 172 

Valuation 164 

Water Bonds and Notes . 167 

Water Debt 129 

Water Department . 203 




m